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View Full Version : Rust remover: Milkstone Acid Rinse


737Pilot
03-31-2010, 08:03 PM
I ordered this stuff from tractor supply: HERE (http://www.tractorsupply.com/livestock/livestock-equipment/cattle-handling/dairyland-milkstone-remover-acid-rinse-2214079)

I bought 2 jugs. I bought a 32 gal plastic container at WalMart for 13 bucks. I have my lower A-Arms in about 9 gallons of water with 1/2 gal of this Acid rinse. I will give you an update on how well it comes out in the next day.

There have been a few threads on this, but wanted to say that atleast here in TX, they don't carry this stuff and were completely unaware that it existed. But after dealing with them on the phone they did get it. It took about a week or so. I have heard nothing but good about this stuff. So I will have before and after photos within the next day or so......stay tuned!!

Jim '57
03-31-2010, 08:08 PM
Keep us posted, I just , 2 hrs ago put some stuff into The Works, but not sure of what concentration to use .
Jim

auggie56
03-31-2010, 08:16 PM
Looking forward to it Mike.:)

DONZIE
03-31-2010, 10:42 PM
Mike when you pull the parts out of the bath you can rinse them off right away with water & in a short while they will begin to rust. If you don't rinse & just hang the parts & allow to air dry they will form a white powdery film that will protect the parts from rust if not left outdoors. I have parts I left with the white powder on still hanging on the wall unrusted for about 2 years now. Keep in mind this stuff is phosphoric acid & parts left in the bath long enough you will loose metal. Sheet metal if forgotten in for several days or a week or so will be destroyed ask me how I know

737Pilot
03-31-2010, 10:47 PM
Mike when you pull the parts out of the bath you can rinse them off right away with water & in a short while they will begin to rust. If you don't rinse & just hang the parts & allow to air dry they will form a white powdery film that will protect the parts from rust if not left outdoors. I have parts I left with the white powder on still hanging on the wall unrusted for about 2 years now. Keep in mind this stuff is phosphoric acid & parts left in the bath long enough you will loose metal. Sheet metal if forgotten in for several days or a week or so will be destroyed ask me how I know

How long do you usually leave the parts in?

56-210sedan
03-31-2010, 11:14 PM
Mike here is the original post by Donzie http://www.trifive.com/forums/showthread.php?t=11592

DONZIE
04-01-2010, 08:45 AM
It really depends on how rusty the parts are mike. Just try it a few times you'll get the hang of it

Yales55
04-01-2010, 10:01 PM
I read on here and tried it last week and this stuff is great.. can buy at a $1 store for cheap price....:party0031:
I put 2 quarts in a 5 gal. bucket and dropped in Kick panel grilles and OH WOW!!!!! wait about 4 hrs. and eats everything off! Paint and get down to bare metal, NICE! I used full STRENGTH... But DON'T put in pot metal...I had to try it and it starts foaming and I had in there for 10 seconds and it blacken the picece.. :eek:
I want to try cutting it with water to see if I can take off old Chrome pitting pits.:confused0006:
Once it out of bucket it does start to rust within a hour or so.. so I wd-40 it until i'm ready for paint then I do it again and then prep for paint..
after reading about it on here I had to try it and see how good it works...it really does.. I have to try something with more rust next and see how long this lasts before having to change it...:rolleyes:

FUZZY
04-01-2010, 10:09 PM
Running an experiment on a couple parts tonite.

Got two brackets with bumper guards that were rusty.

One is soaking in vinegar.

The other is soaking in CLR

After about 5 hours the CLR seams to be better that the vinegar.

We'll see in the morning.

737Pilot
04-01-2010, 10:57 PM
Update: Ok, as of right now, my lower a-arms/parts have been soaking for 30 hours. They were really rusty and cruddy. I just went out at 9:45pm after I got home from a flight to see how they were doing and the rust is almost all gone! I am gonna leave them in there until tomorrow morning. I diluted it to 1/2 gallon to about 9 gallons of water. Absolutely amazing stuff!!!

I will post before and afters once I get them out of the tub tomorrow.

Lloyd's 55
04-01-2010, 11:07 PM
Mike. Those were my same results, except I used 1/2 gall to 5 gall of water (doesn't take as long). Really worked. Lloyd

737Pilot
04-01-2010, 11:36 PM
Yeah, I was thinking maybe if I upped the ratio it would eat the rust faster! I am totally amazed at how well the rust is coming off. I pulled an A-Arm out just to look at it and it looks like brand new metal with the exception of the bit of rust in some areas that hasn't totally come off yet. I can't wait to put more parts in there!!!

Chevynut
04-01-2010, 11:51 PM
I'm curious how this stuff would compare to using Muriatic acid that you can get at Home Depot for about $10 a gallon. I'll bet you can dilute it just about the same amount and get similar results, and not have to order it.

mickeywestsr
04-02-2010, 07:13 AM
Thanks for the info guys......gotta get me some of that.

737Pilot
04-02-2010, 09:16 AM
I'm curious how this stuff would compare to using Muriatic acid that you can get at Home Depot for about $10 a gallon. I'll bet you can dilute it just about the same amount and get similar results, and not have to order it.

Laszlo,

I have 2 gallons of muratic acid from Lowes. I had to buy it last year when I was sealing one of my moped's gas tanks with an Eastwood Tank Sealer kit. The instructions called for mixing it with water and filling the tank and letting it sit for a while to eat the rust in the tank. It did absolutely nothing! Now, I don't remember what the ratio was and I only allowed it to sit for like a half hour (according to the instructions). I remember I kept pouring more acid in to get the rust to go away and it didn't matter.

This stuff is working well! My A-arms are pretty rusty. Sure I have had to wait a day or so, but man, the parts are looking brand new. Plus it can be used over and over from what DONZIE says. I have a cover for my plastic tub to keep dust and stuff out. So I now have a mini dip tank! I'm gonna throw in my upper a arms today.

Hotroddder
04-02-2010, 10:04 AM
You should really try Citirc Acid Powder, No fumes, and it is actually a food additive. Maybe a bit slower, but results are great. Heavy rust may have to be brushed a few times to allow access to the underlying rust.

Hotroddder

auggie56
04-02-2010, 10:19 AM
You should really try Citirc Acid Powder, No fumes, and it is actually a food additive. Maybe a bit slower, but results are great. Heavy rust may have to be brushed a few times to allow access to the underlying rust.

Hotroddder

Where can it be bought Hotroddder ?

Hotroddder
04-02-2010, 11:14 AM
I bought 20 lbs from E-bay. It can be found in smaller sizes at local grocery stores, maybe speciality food stores. Also bulk to 100 lb bags maybe from local food supply warehouse. I called around and in 4-5 tries I fould a local bulk supplier. I put about 10 lbs in a 40 quart container from HD hald full of water, and have been using it for a couple of months.... It works overnight on surface to medium rust. Heavy rust may take a couple of days or more and a scrubbing with a wire brush on the heavy areas.

Remove and dry or heat to dry.

One down side is that it does not leave any protective coating.

If I could find milkstone locally I would use that as well, but not to be found in WA state.

Hotroddder

Chevynut
04-02-2010, 11:30 AM
Laszlo,

I have 2 gallons of muratic acid from Lowes. I had to buy it last year when I was sealing one of my moped's gas tanks with an Eastwood Tank Sealer kit. The instructions called for mixing it with water and filling the tank and letting it sit for a while to eat the rust in the tank. It did absolutely nothing! Now, I don't remember what the ratio was and I only allowed it to sit for like a half hour (according to the instructions). I remember I kept pouring more acid in to get the rust to go away and it didn't matter.



I'm 100% sure that muriatic acid will remove rust. I used it to remove the mill scale on my firewall. Don't know why it didn't work on your gas tank.

If you have another tank, why not try your upper a-arms in the muriatic acid for comparison? :party0031:

DONZIE
04-02-2010, 09:12 PM
MURIATC is nasty stuff will remove rust but it seems to do more damage to the metal. Sort of like opening the pores more than phosphoric. Rust will start as soon as the part hits the air. Storing the muriatic is a real task man the fumes will make everything in your shop rust, THE STUFF DESOLVES CONCRETE! I'm no chemist for sure but if i am not mistaken muriatic is nothing more than diluted sulfuric acid (battery acid) horrible stuff to handle & for god sake keep it away from the little ones.
Yep keep a lid on your bath too I awoke from a nightmare where I dreamed I had forgot to cover mine & my wifes CAT thought she was jumping on top of the barrel but....

DONZIE
04-02-2010, 09:17 PM
MIKE I have had problems removing rust from inside tanks if they are full of old fuel residue. The residue keeps the acids from getting to the rust. I remove the resudue with carb cleaner or use a hot water pressure washer / steam cleaner

Jemo
04-03-2010, 12:19 AM
Muriatic acid is Hydrochloric Acid.

Sorry, lots of chemistry in my past. :) I believe it has a lower pH than the other acids mentioned.

I also had a bad experience with Muriatic acid. I was using it to dissolve rust and inadvertently left a container of it in my garage not tightly closed. I couldn't figure out why everything in the garage was rusting but soon found out!

Jeff

Lloyd's 55
04-03-2010, 01:02 AM
Maybe a little dense here, but, Tractor Supply, CAN ORDER MILKSTONE.....(I posted a pic of it)(They can't find it on their computer, you have to help them) $10.00 per gal, I dilute 1/2gal milkstone to 5 gal of water. IT WORKS....Muaitic Acid might work, don't know. Do know Milkstone does work for me. Many ways to skin this cat. Whatever works for you is perfect. :) Lloyd

737Pilot
04-04-2010, 07:24 PM
Ok here are some pictures of the a-arms and other parts. They were all really nasty. They all soaked for just about 48 hours. It doesn't seem to remove grease at all, but rust and paint come off. You can see some paint still on the upper a-arms, but it's just sitting there, it peels right off. Also, the Lower a-arms are dry, and the uppers and other parts I just pulled out today. I'm pretty impressed with this stuff.

Before pictures:

737Pilot
04-04-2010, 07:27 PM
Afters. And yes, that is my old underwear!!!!

MISURACO
04-04-2010, 07:34 PM
A sand blasting cabinet is the ticket. No need to wait days for parts to be cleaned up.

737Pilot
04-04-2010, 07:36 PM
A sand blasting cabinet is the ticket. No need to wait days for parts to be cleaned up.

The waiting is a non-issue for me. I throw it in, I do other things, I come back to it in 2 days. Zero effort.

kimos55
04-04-2010, 10:10 PM
Everyone saying how well these acids work but no ones mentioning about hydro embrittlement? I'm not to worried about body parts but, much so for suspension parts.

737Pilot
04-04-2010, 11:09 PM
Everyone saying how well these acids work but no ones mentioning about hydro embrittlement? I'm not to worried about body parts but, much so for suspension parts.

I thought hydrogen embrittlement was a concern for high strength steels/hardened steels. Anyone?

bugeye409
04-05-2010, 01:45 PM
From Wikipedia:

The mechanism starts with lone hydrogen atoms diffusing through the metal. At high temperatures, the elevated solubility of hydrogen allows hydrogen to diffuse into the metal (or the hydrogen can diffuse in at a low temperature, assisted by a concentration gradient). When these hydrogen atoms re-combine in minuscule voids of the metal matrix to form hydrogen molecules, they create pressure from inside the cavity they are in. This pressure can increase to levels where the metal has reduced ductility and tensile strength up to the point where it cracks open (hydrogen induced cracking, or HIC). High-strength and low-alloy steels, nickel and titanium alloys are most susceptible. Steel with an ultimate tensile strength of less than 1000 MPa or hardness of less than 30 HRC are not generally considered susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Jewett et al.[1] reports the results of tensile tests carried out on several structural metals under high-pressure molecular hydrogen environment. These tests have shown that austenitic stainless steels, aluminum (including alloys), copper (including alloys, e.g. beryllium copper) are not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement along with few other metals[2].

Hydrogen embrittlement can occur during various manufacturing operations or operational use - anywhere that the metal comes into contact with atomic or molecular hydrogen. Processes that can lead to this include cathodic protection, phosphating, pickling, and electroplating. A special case is arc welding, in which the hydrogen is released from moisture (for example in the coating of the welding electrodes; to minimize this, special low-hydrogen electrodes are used for welding high-strength steels). Other mechanisms of introduction of hydrogen into metal are galvanic corrosion, chemical reactions of metal with acids, or with other chemicals (notably hydrogen sulfide in sulfide stress cracking, or SSC, a process of importance for the oil and gas industries).

To me it doesn't sound like hydrogen embrittlement would be a problem, but I'm not a chemist nor a metallurgist.

FUZZY
04-05-2010, 09:00 PM
Been experimenting the last few days. Put some parts in various solutions to see how well they really worked compared to one another.

Put similar parts in Pure Vinegar and CLR

http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k91/SSRFUZZY/IMG_3295.jpg

Results were ok. Took a long time and some effort in between to scrub the rust scaling too.

Put some in Milkstone acid and water solution on Sunday morning. Pulled it out today and found this.
http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k91/SSRFUZZY/IMG_3296.jpg
A little closer. You can tell what was in the solution and what wasn't submerged
http://i86.photobucket.com/albums/k91/SSRFUZZY/IMG_3297.jpg

My thoughts on this stuff is. If you can put a bunch of these small parts in the solution. cover them up and go work on something else for a few days (body work, paint, what ever) then come back to these and rinse them off it might be worth it. The milkstone solution did work the best and faster than the others. And it cost less then the CLR. Found it at Farm & Fleet here in Janesville. Total cost was 8 bucks for a gallon and I've used half of it in the 40 gallon vat.

Put some more parts in tonight. Raining here tonight and have other parts painted and waiting for them to dry, so nothing else to do but wait.

auggie56
04-05-2010, 09:17 PM
Anyone know if that milk stone will damage chrome ?

C57heaven
04-05-2010, 09:27 PM
Is this the stuff you used 737?
http://www.tractorsupply.com/cattle-handling/dairyland-milkstone-remover-acid-rinse-2214079

737Pilot
04-05-2010, 09:31 PM
Is this the stuff you used 737?
http://www.tractorsupply.com/cattle-handling/dairyland-milkstone-remover-acid-rinse-2214079

That's the stuff. Here in Houston they don't stock it so they have to order it. But they don't know what it is. So it might take a little bit of haggling to get it if they don't stock it where you are. I mixed a gal with 10 gal of water.

I read on another board somewhere that to totally clean the phosphate off before paint that you should use acetone or otherwise epoxy paints my not stick.

rusty belair
04-05-2010, 11:13 PM
Keep us posted, I just , 2 hrs ago put some stuff into The Works, but not sure of what concentration to use .
Jim

jim from what i have read you dont cut the works bowl cleaner use as is

Lloyd's 55
04-05-2010, 11:28 PM
[QUOTE=FUZZY;395825] Total cost was 8 bucks for a gallon and I've used half of it in the 40 gallon vat.


Fuzzy, mix it at 1/2 gal to 5 gal of water and you will see how it really works. JMHO. Worked for me. Lloyd :)

FUZZY
04-06-2010, 09:50 AM
Lloyd

I'll check the parts this morning and see how they look. If need be I can up the concentration.