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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 327 in the 55 my dad had. He mentioned that the guy he bought it from back in 1970 replaced the engine with a corvette engine. I question if that's true based on the information that I could gather. or maybe he meant just the heads? The VIN of the car confirms that as it had an inline 6 originally.

I'm trying to find out if it's worth attempting to rebuild the engine or just start fresh.

I wanted to check if I identified parts correctly and I am having some troubles figuring out other codes.

I took images of all the castings and stamped numbers I saw which can be found at this album. https://goo.gl/photos/Y636MDKovKsV3vLL9

On to the actual information about the engine.

Block IDs
The engine code stamp is T0920S which I looked up as Tonawanda September 20th 1962 powerglide.

Under the timing chain cover it has the casting of 810 870 T G9. I couldn't find any information on these casting numbers.

On the rear ledge of the block near the bell housing mounting surface it has the casting CONV 1. This seems to be useless as a block casting mold identifier?

There's also quite a bit on the left side including the casting number. From looking at 8782870 castings those were 62-64 327 60cc engines the full information.
H18 83 GM 8782870 3T

Underneath a water plug on the side it has the numbers 810 H8 870. Is this the size of the engine at 810 cubic inches? That's based on mortec's location guide.

Heads
3795896 T Triangle GM X2 01 F2483 with arrow pointing at 7 o'clock.
Possibly a 327 62-64 Corvette head with a Power Pack?
Header ID casting mark is a triangle centered over a rectangle.
 

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Krizzo
Yes, you have a 327(S). Used in full size cars and pickups in that time frame. HEADS (you called them headers) you have are commonly known as "power pack" heads. Used on 283 and 327. Corvette blocks of that era were stamped with two letters only(not one letter), and Corvette switched to 327 in '62(no more 283).
So, you have a nice lower HP 327. I actually have two sets of the same "power pack" heads too. Nice, but not exciting as far as performance is concerned. Also, the higher HP heads of that era were called "double hump" camel heads with casting number .......461. The front of the head(and back)is a cast rectangle with two humps on top of the rectangle(thus double hump). Those '62-'67 327's were the motor to have of that era. Keep that engine. Also, if the motor ever gets rebuilt, it must have a modern (retro fit) roller cam. The new common oils do not have the zinc in them anymore. Worth rebuilding?Financally no. Era correct yes. A '55 Chevy with a 327 was the greatest. It is soooooooo common to buy a new modern 350 and you're done. And, that same new engine has so many HP levels. Hope this helps.
Dennis Bubp
 

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I have a 327 in the 55 my dad had. He mentioned that the guy he bought it from back in 1970 replaced the engine with a corvette engine. I question if that's true based on the information that I could gather. or maybe he meant just the heads? The VIN of the car confirms that as it had an inline 6 originally.

I'm trying to find out if it's worth attempting to rebuild the engine or just start fresh.

I wanted to check if I identified parts correctly and I am having some troubles figuring out other codes.

I took images of all the castings and stamped numbers I saw which can be found at this album. https://goo.gl/photos/Y636MDKovKsV3vLL9

On to the actual information about the engine.

Block IDs
The engine code stamp is T0920S which I looked up as Tonawanda September 20th 1962 powerglide.

Under the timing chain cover it has the casting of 810 870 T G9. I couldn't find any information on these casting numbers.

On the rear ledge of the block near the bell housing mounting surface it has the casting CONV 1. This seems to be useless as a block casting mold identifier?

There's also quite a bit on the left side including the casting number. From looking at 8782870 castings those were 62-64 327 60cc engines the full information.
H18 83 GM 8782870 3T

Underneath a water plug on the side it has the numbers 810 H8 870. Is this the size of the engine at 810 cubic inches? That's based on mortec's location guide.

Heads
3795896 T Triangle GM X2 01 F2483 with arrow pointing at 7 o'clock.
Possibly a 327 62-64 Corvette head with a Power Pack?
Header ID casting mark is a triangle centered over a rectangle.
Your stamping is T0920S indicating a Tonawanda built engine. All Vette engines came out of the Flint plant and would start with an F. The S suffix indicates a 62-64 327 with 250 HP, 4 barrel carb, Powerglide trans and was originally from a full size car. (Impala etc)
 

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JMHO, everyone has a 350. If the 327 means anything to you rebuild it, you don't need to go to a roller cam. There are a number of oils still available to work in a flat tappet cam.

If it runs good and doesn't burn oil, just run it. I have a 68 327 in my car with the powerpack heads, originally non PP with a 2 barrel carb. It runs great and has the "cool" factor of a 327.:):tu:bowtier:
 

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JMHO, everyone has a 350. If the 327 means anything to you rebuild it, you don't need to go to a roller cam. There are a number of oils still available to work in a flat tappet cam.

If it runs good and doesn't burn oil, just run it. I have a 68 327 in my car with the powerpack heads, originally non PP with a 2 barrel carb. It runs great and has the "cool" factor of a 327.:):tu:bowtier:
I agree, get a SL rated motor oil and add a $2.75 bottle of STP oil Treatment if extra zinc makes you feel better.
 

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You have a 250 hp 327. It's the lowest hp version of a 327 that was ever built. That engine was available in Corvettes - the lowest performance ones.

It's nothing special.

As far as rebuilding it, the block and crank is fine for any 327 build. The heads need to be replaced if you want any kind of performance, as well as the intake manifold and carb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the replies.

Yeah I read that Tonawanda didn't produce any Vette engines which is why I doubted it came from one. I also could have misunderstood what my dad was saying this was back in 2003.

Yeah I do have memories with this engine as my dad and I pulled it out back in 2004 and he was helping me learn about the car and taking the engine apart.

I would put roller cams as I like them better. I don't remember the model but it has a Holley carb that looks like the double pumper. That was the first thing I rebuilt with my dad since it was the easiest 12 years later who knows I might have to rebuilt it since it just been sitting in a shoebox in the trunk of the car.

Would it be worth trying to find two camel heads or go after market if I did want to get a bit more power out of it?

I'm looking around for a couple of machine shops that can do an inspection to make sure there aren't any cracks in the heads or block. That would be a major deciding factor if I can use them or not.
 

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Krizzo
What are your hp plans? If just cruzing, having a nice driver, then the power pack heads will do the job. If higher performance, then realistically, after market pair maybe aluminum if wanted. Era correct, might get a little costly.
Dennis Bubp
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
This would be a cruising nice Sunday driver type car from what I'm thinking at the same time having it have some oomph would be nice. If I can I'll probably end up rebuilding it and then if I want to give it some more power later swap it with another and keep the 327 in a nice dry place.
 

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Krizzo
I had a '62 Belair in 1969. It was all original. 327 with 4bbl carb., 250hp(because it was a three speed, 300hp IF it was a 4sp.). Had plenty of hp for that big car. Cruzed around great. You are on the right track. That engine will not be any slouch.
Dennis Bubp
 

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Sounds like you should keep it just from the memory's and history you have with it.
The block is just any other 327 block, crank and rods. If in good shape they can be rebuilt and run many strong trouble free years.

There is a few things you will want to upgrade for the roller cam, but with some help from a good machine shop and the cost to rebuild the motor it cam be a really strong running engine.

The trick is to build it mild to where it does not have a radical camshaft or more than 9.5:1 compression. They will easily make 300hp with the right roller cam, even with rebuilding the power pack heads.
 

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My 68 327 was about 210hp and as stated earlier I added PP heads, an edlebrock 4 bl intake and an AFB 4 barrel. I am guessing 240-250hp. Its plenty for cruising and goes up hill without slamming into a lower gear like the new cars do. The torque converter doesn't even unlock. I have a 700r4 and 3.55 gears.

Its not a drag racer but I don't care.:bowtier:
 
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