Chevy Tri Five Forum banner

121 - 140 of 168 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,967 Posts
Seriously, you are making great progress during your scale back / retirement ? It’s cool that you had this project on the back burner for along time till now. It like you have had quite some time to think custom things over , and now time to apply.
Stretch.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #122
Well, it's pretty crude at this stage, but I've got a remote control, electrically operated, flip front end. The motor certainly doesn't have any problem with the weight, but is too loud and it runs too slow. I'm going to continue looking at other sources. It also doesn't go far enough up, so the lifting point needs to be moved forward. More geometry to solve. Even with the extra bracing, there's a lot of play in the entire system that'll have to be eliminated. Those door and gate hinges are the main culprit, but the main hinge bolts need to be tuned up, and probably a roller bearing or two added in for good measure. But hey, it works!!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
That's awesome!

I used to work on a turbine that spun around 70,000RPM's and on it was a gear reduction box that would reduce those RPM's appropriately for the various accessories that were run off it. You may consider other motor sources knowing a fabricated gearbox could be used.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #124
I've run the front end up and down quite a few times, and that scissor jack isn't going to make the cut. The clatter it makes when it's running is so annoying, as is the time it takes to go through it's travel. Both would be embarrassing (to me) if I was at a show. And although I came up with a way to extend the travel, I'm just not going to bother with it. I've done more searching the interweb, but nothing suitable has turned up.
My original idea of using an aircraft type still seems like the best bet, but even with that Cessna wing flap actuator I borrowed (back in post #18) as an example in hand, every local shop I visited had nothing even remotely close. The Cessna motor is 24 volt, and the ball screw shaft is too short, so it wouldn't work as is. Plus it wasn't mine, so I didn't want to mess it up. Similar units are on eBay, with prices ranging from around $100 and (way) up, so I called Mike to see if he would sell it to me. He said, "No, you can just have it." Great!! I told him I'd have to get the shaft lengthened and the motor switched to 12 volts, and he told me he's pretty certain he has another part that's the same, but with a 12 volt motor, and I can just exchange it. Awesome!!
Now that I know I can use it, I called my master machinist buddy, Paul, and he came over to see what I was trying to do. After a lengthy consultation, together we've revised what needs to be changed with the mounting and hinge system. I'm now going to extend the radiator support bracket on the frame, and modify it so the actuator will sit lower. Paul will make me up the hinge assembly and the brackets to attach everything. Knowing the work that Paul does, it'll be really slick. The best part of all? Paul needs a headliner and some carpets made up for the trunk of his '54 Ford hardtop. Labor swaps are so sweet!!!
20210122_134350.jpg
20210122_134116.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #125
I took out the scissor jack and those hideous temporary hinges. Had one heck of a time cutting/grinding off the rad support bracket, but it's done. There's a possibility I can modify it enough to re-use it, but it'll need a couple of Band-Aids, that's for sure. After cleaning off the weld remains from the cross member, I started to fit up the Cessna actuator. As with the jack, there's not a whole bunch of room to play with, and this time it's got to be done properly. The sway bar runs right through the space I hoped the actuator would sit in, so right off the bat my plans had to change. I ended up taking a few dozen measurements of the distance I had to work in, the height and spacing of the cross member to the old rad support, and the actuator itself. Then I went into draftsman mode, and made a full scale drawing of the components. I made a paper cutout of the actuator so I could move it around, and see where it fit / function the best. It was pretty clear that the actuator was going to sit higher than I expected, but that's okay. I'm still going to end up with a similar concept as I had with the scissor jack hinge setup, but it will be much more refined. I'll review my drawings with Paul, and see what he thinks.
20210123_115652.jpg
20210123_115700.jpg
20210123_154043.jpg
20210123_155347.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,827 Posts
Those last two pictures makes me wonder if you're designing a watch instead of playing with an old car.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
Dave, you're front cross member under the engine looks different than mine. Is that a factory piece?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #130
I pondered making up the support bracket from scratch, but dismissed that idea, as it would take more equipment than I have. At a minimum I'd need leaf or box brake capable of bending 1/8" steel, and my pathetic el-cheap-o 36" brake can barely handle .030 aluminum. So I figured it would be more realistic to repair and modify the original part, plus it would end up looking more like an OEM piece. Timewise, it probably took longer, but I'm okay with that.
Using that drawing I made, I cut out the side profile and used the paper as a template for the 1/8" side plates, which I cut out with a jig saw. I used a scrap of rectangular tubing for the nose piece, and cut that to match the inside width of the stock bracket. The side plates were tacked to the tubing, then the assembly tacked to the bracket. Once I was satisfied with the fit and alignment, I welded it further.
For the curved underside, I planned to use a piece of 3" tubing. It only had to be 5" long, but the only pieces I had in the shop were short chunks of an old telepost, the longest being 2 1/4". Sooner than drive 30 minutes each way to the Metal Supermarket (added to the fact that I'm cheap), I used what I had. I sliced the tube lengthways into 3 sections, butt welded them together, then trimmed the piece to fit. I tacked it into position, then welded it solid all around. The front lip of the original bracket rested nicely onto the inside of the tubing, so that was also welded for extra support.
The top plate was made from the same scrap of 1/8" I used for the side plates. I clamped it in the vice and gave it a couple of smacks with my large plastic mallet to fold it slightly.
I also used the 1/8" to replace the "ears" on either side of the original bracket. They were pretty much destroyed when I cut the bracket off the frame. I welded up the pop rivet holes, and filled some of the larger gouges with weld bead. There was one heck of a lot of grinding involved to smooth everything out, but it ended up looking pretty decent IMHO. One thing for sure, it's certainly going to be strong enough to support the actuator. I'm in the middle of making up temporary (but beefier) brackets to mount it, and figure out exactly where I'm going to lift the front end from.
20210125_144725.jpg
20210125_144738.jpg
20210126_104758.jpg
20210126_113341.jpg
20210126_113351.jpg
20210126_113400.jpg
20210126_113412.jpg
 

·
Stainless Trim Restoration
Joined
·
9,582 Posts
I would add a gusset in the middle between the 2 bolt holes to add stability in the middle. It doesn't need to be as large as the sides, just enough to keep the front edge from compressing. That will be a lot of force
on the the tip.

Mikey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #132
I would add a gusset in the middle between the 2 bolt holes to add stability in the middle. It doesn't need to be as large as the sides, just enough to keep the front edge from compressing. That will be a lot of force
on the the tip.

Mikey
Good point Mikey! I'll add the gusset.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #133
Here's your suggested gusset, Mikey. My welding tip doesn't like going in those tight spots (read that: Dave doesn't have enough experience yet), so I had to grind off a considerable amount of extra weld bead that simply missed the target.

I picked up the 12 volt actuator yesterday, and like all good auto enthusiasts, I immediately started taking it apart. I only got as far as taking the cover plate off the transmission case when I was stumped. Someone had drilled alongside the threads on the driveshaft and driven a pin in there to lock the nut in place. A call to and a picture sent to Mike confirmed that this was not quite normal, and I'd have to drill the pin out. Uh-oh. I just bought a new drill bit set, but it's not top of the line. I have a few carbide drill bits, and one of them was a 3/32", so that's what I started with. Thankfully the pin was not hardened steel, and it drilled out easily. With the nut removed, a couple of taps on the end of the ballscrew shaft knocked the gear off. A couple more harder shots with a larger hammer, and with the case resting on my vice jaws, drove the shaft out from the bearing. Now I just have to source a much longer ballshaft, and find a machinist that can splice it onto this drive.

20210127_102648.jpg
20210127_102657.jpg
20210126_162459.jpg
20210127_101036.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #134
I don't know what the heck is wrong with shops in my area. I made a few phone calls and visits to some machine shops today, inquiring about changing the length of the ballscrew shaft in the actuator. Might as well have been speaking in Klingon (hope that doesn't offend anyone) or asking them to carve me a unicorn. Isn't this the exact type of thing that machine shops are supposed to be able to do? Even with the piece in hand, not one of them seemed to understand what I wanted to do, or were remotely interested in doing the job. The closest thing I got to a positive response was from one guy, who told me "All these things you're talking about doing would be really, really expensive." Then he actually turned his back on me, and just walked away! Unbelievable!! And for the record, I was wearing a mask. He wasn't.

So I came home, spent a few minutes on the computer, and for around $100 (Canadian), I've got a 500mm x 20mm stainless steel ballscrew shaft and ballnut being delivered to my door, courtesy of Amazon. The 500mm length is easily cut down to whatever I need, and the 20mm thickness is twice that of the one on the flap actuator, which is also good, as I wondered whether the thinner one would flex under load. And with a shaft that thick, I can just have the end turned down to the correct size and threaded, so no welding will be necessary.
71ZlnkG8jxL._AC_SL1500_.jpg
 

·
Stainless Trim Restoration
Joined
·
9,582 Posts
And that is why none of those shop wanted to take on the job. As you know, one off stuff is expensive. That shaft was more than likely made by a robot that made 1000's of them. Same as the nut!

Mikey
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #136
I get that, Mikey. I'm kind of in the "one-off" business, myself. But I treat every inquiry seriously and (hopefully) professionally, no matter how odd the request seems. Sometimes a one-off job is the only solution for a customer, as it is for me and this actuator. Thankfully I'm able to make these modifications, often with the help of others, as I'm not a millionaire. But what if money was no object? These shops didn't even get around to talking about dollars, they just weren't interested.
Years ago, I had a client call me and tell me he wanted the interior of his aircraft to "look like Indiana Jones". I didn't know anything about him, but I said I'd take a look at it. It turned out he had a vintage Grumman Mallard, and he was doing a complete rebuild of the entire aircraft. The entire job would be in excess of two million dollars!! I ended up getting one heck of a large contract from him.
 

·
Stainless Trim Restoration
Joined
·
9,582 Posts
I fully understand. I have succeed doing things in my business.....that others said just could not be done........Different world we live in nowadays.....

Mikey
 
  • Like
Reactions: ETriggs

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #138
Still waiting for the ballscrew shaft to arrive. Supposed to be here today, but I'm not holding my breath. Paul has the bracket that will mount the actuator to the frame almost done. He brought it over for a test fit Saturday, and I like it. It's clean and simple, and that's exactly what I wanted.
I've been busy with customer stuff lately, but now I'm back at it. One of the things that was bugging me about the tilt front end, is that when it's up, you're looking at the back side of the rad support, the hood, and everything else that you'd normally not be looking at with the hood up. I've got some ideas planned for the rad support, but that has to wait for all the front end to be disassembled. So yesterday I began with the hood.
The (relatively) easiest thing to do would simply flip the support bracket around, and call it done. But that's not how I roll. There's a large hump in the center for the rad hose, a somewhat smaller one off to one side where factory A/C would go, and a slight bump on the other side for I-don't-know-what. None of them will be used for their intended function, so they either need to go or be re-purposed. The ribs in the stamping are complicated, and way above my pay grade to try and fabricate. I have a spare (not so pretty) hood with the support intact, so I dragged it out and removed the piece. With the two supports side by side on the bench, I could see there's potential, but the donor pieces would be opposites. I'd need to do some creative slicing and dicing.
After cleaning off the scale from the spare, I marked out the sections that were best suited as fillers, and cut them out. Those sections were placed on top of the problem areas to check the fit. The slight hump can be corrected with one donor piece, but the donor piece I'd use to fill in the larger hump has the same slight hump, so it would have to be made from two pieces. Clear as mud? Anyway, much trimming, filing, and test fitting later, I have one side welded in. Today I'll fill in the other side, then grind it all smooth.
The large hump in the center I'm still thinking about. Because it's centered, it's not as odd looking as the others. My thoughts at this time are telling me this might be a great location for an under hood light, but we'll see.
20210207_102101.jpg
20210207_133259.jpg
20210207_134407.jpg
20210207_134413.jpg
20210207_134418.jpg
20210207_134425.jpg
20210207_134435.jpg
20210207_155453.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #139
I've got both sides of the hood support welded, ground down, and a light coat of primer over the modified area. Even though you won't be able to see the back, it's also been smoothed over, just in case some a$$ hat runs their fingers over it. It'll take a slight bit of filler and some block sanding to make it perfect, but I'm pretty happy with the overall result. It sure looks cleaner with that edge running straight. The next step will be sorting out the bends on either end, as they're now pointing the wrong way, and interfering with the cross braces.
20210208_144404.jpg
20210208_144418.jpg
20210208_144424.jpg
20210208_144348.jpg
20210209_104749.jpg
20210209_104757.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,559 Posts
Discussion Starter #140
Paul (the machinist) came over yesterday afternoon with the finished mounting bracket for the actuator. The piece is not overly complicated, but you can see from the picture that it's light years ahead of my crude attempt. While I was admiring his workmanship, the UPS truck showed up with the new ballscrew shaft. Perfect timing!! Like kids on Christmas morning, we both huddled around as the box was opened. I must admit, the Chinese made part was a pretty nice piece of hardware! It's really beefy compared to the shaft that came with the Cessna actuator, and there's zero play in the nut that rides up and down. Paul and I discussed how the piece would be machined to work for my application, and away he went with parts in hand. I'm not sure who's more excited about seeing this thing operate, him or me. The picture in the printout is the bearing(s) that Paul plans to incorporate into the hinge points on the frame horns. There's nothing I like better than bringing someone into help with the build, and they're just as enthusiastic as I am.

20210208_160030.jpg
20210208_160023.jpg
20210208_160019.jpg
 
121 - 140 of 168 Posts
Top