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g-man. I ran into this very issue with my sons 57. My boards were horrendous and there were a lot of other issues that had to be fixed. My son’s car not quite so bad but in the helm of what yours look like. At first glance I thought I could make the repairs with new braces, some new pans and all would be good. But each time I started to cut or weld I was blowing holes through everything because of how thin the metal was in the floor boards. My longtime friend had encouraged me to replace the entire floor from the get go but I resisted. I could fix it, I was sure. In the end, he was right, we surrendered and got an entire floor. Under 1000 with braces and inner rockers already attached. it was a little work don’t get me wrong, but we ended up with a way better result.

just food for thought.
 

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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
g-man. I ran into this very issue with my sons 57. My boards were horrendous and there were a lot of other issues that had to be fixed. My son’s car not quite so bad but in the helm of what yours look like. At first glance I thought I could make the repairs with new braces, some new pans and all would be good. But each time I started to cut or weld I was blowing holes through everything because of how thin the metal was in the floor boards. My longtime friend had encouraged me to replace the entire floor from the get go but I resisted. I could fix it, I was sure. In the end, he was right, we surrendered and got an entire floor. Under 1000 with braces and inner rockers already attached. it was a little work don’t get me wrong, but we ended up with a way better result.

just food for thought.
Because the center transmission / driveshaft tunnel was in good shape and VERY SOLID . . . . I didn't see the need to cut out good metal and the entire floor pan. Besides, current trucking costs for a full floor pan would probably be very expensive.

Initially I was going to buy a full half floor pan for each side.

When I went to buy the first full half floor pan, the cost for the half floor pan was $300 . . . . but the supplier quoted me an additional $680 for trucking, since the pan was so large that it had to go by truck freight. So my total cost per side would have been $1,000 . . . . and that would not have included the new toe boards that I needed.
Trucking costs have gone through the roof in the last couple of years due to the pandemic, truck driver shortages, supply chain issues and diesel fuel costs.

So I ended up ordering new smaller floor panels that could be shipped via. standard UPS and FedEx.

In addition, I was using a friend's garage that had an automotive lift to conduct the floor repairs. He is doing a frame off restoration of a 1973 Corvette which he had to move outside to accommodate me . . . . and I ended up tying up his garage for 2 weeks. I also didn't feel the need to replace the entire floor (because that would have taken up even more time in his garage . . . . . . and I didn't want to overstay my welcome).

I was also concerned about the body twisting if I cut out the entire floor pan and having difficulty getting the new entire floor pan to line up inside the car.

I ended up replacing the floor on one side of the car at a time, with the transmission tunnel and the floor on the other side keeping the body from twisting,

Believe me . . . . I cut out every piece of rotted metal . . . . and every new price of floor was welded to solid metal.
It came out pretty nice . . . . and I will be posting some photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
After everything was welded in, I used Evercoat # 365 seam sealer on the interior and exterior floor panel seams.
I really liked the Evercoat #365 seam sealer. Good stuff and easy to work with . . . and its thick enough that it doesn't drip when doing the seams under the car.
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I used a disposable 2-inch paint brush (with the bristles cut short) to apply the seam sealer (which has the consistency of peanut butter). Fumes are a little strong . . . .so make sure to use it with adequate ventilation. I kept my garage door open when applying it.

After sealing the inner and outer seams, I painted the inside floor area by brush with some enamel paint and the floor area underneath the car (just to prevent any surface rusting and to neaten things up a little). Here are some photos of the interior floor areas after they were painted.

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Big improvement over what I started with . . . which was a dirty rusty mess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
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Wish a had an automotive lift . . . but I guess 4 jack stands will have to do.

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I wanted to share a couple of mistakes I made when I was cutting out the floors . . . . and maybe this will save others from doing the same.

Mistake #1
I should have covered the interior of all the glass windows with cardboard, old blankets or thick plastic to prevent damage to them. When I was cutting the floors out with the cut off wheels, glowing hot metal sparks were flying off the cut off wheels and hitting the glass.
When these tiny white hot metal slivers hit the glass, they melted onto the glass. So now the interior of all my glass is covered with hundreds and hundreds of tiny metal slivers melted into them. I can pop the slivers of metal off with a razor blade but it still leaves a hundreds of tiny little melted spots on the glass that you can feel with your hand.

(I bought a new windshield and a back glass and I plan on replacing them soon. I ordered the windshield and back glass panel in separate orders from Auto City Classics. I am pleased with Auto City Classics because the windshield and back glass were packaged very well to prevent damage and their prices were in line with other suppliers. In addition, Auto City Classics did not ship these as truck freight but instead Auto City Classics shipped them as an oversize FedEx package, so the shipping was only $110 per item, compared to most suppliers that ship these as truck freight, which definitely would have cost more).

Mistake #2
I should have worn better eye protection.
I wore safety glasses when I was using the cut off wheels, air chisel or during any grinding . . . . however, the safety glasses had small gaps on the sides that allowed tiny slivers of metal to get into my eyes.

These are the type of safety glasses that I was wearing.

View attachment 368220

I few days after cutting out the floors, my eyes swelled up so bad I could barely open them and could hardly see anything.

I ended up having to go to an eye surgeon to have a sliver of metal removed from each of my eyes. Had to wear an eye patch on one of them for 3 days and treatment of antibiotics in both. Took about 18 days for my eyes to fully heal and return back to normal.

I should have been wearing better protective goggles like these . . which have a gasket and fit tight to your face and prevents anything from coming in from the side.

View attachment 368222


In addition to the protective goggles, I should also have been wearing a good quality protective face shield such as this.

View attachment 368223

I bought these items AFTER my eyes had been injured . . . to make sure this never happens again.
Got them off Amazon and they had good reviews.
I have been using them ever since this happened and will continue to do so in the future.

I got lucky and my eyes recovered . . . . but don't make my mistake . . . it could have been much worse.
Damn. I'm feeling very lucky now. Thanks for sharing. I need to get a shield.
 

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Discussion Starter · #50 ·
After driving the car for some time, I determined that the engine's rear main seal was leaking oil.
In addition, I discovered the engine's front crank seal at the harmonic balancer was leaking oil really bad.
I was adding a quart of oil about every 300 miles driven . . . . and I know I wasn't burning the oil because I did not have any blue smoke out the exhaust.

Replacing the two-piece rear main crankshaft seal requires removing the oil pan.
And in order to remove the oil pan, I would need to jack up the engine.
If I have to go about jacking up the engine . . . . I decided that I might as well just remove the engine from the car. That way the engine will be a lot easier to work on . . . since I have a bunch of other stuff I want to do to the engine and the car.

Removed the radiator, radiator support, battery tray, radiator support filler panels, etc.

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Pulled the engine and transmission out as one unit.

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Bought some bolt on engine mount stands from Speedway Motors. These are great for setting the engine down on the ground and keep everything nice and stable.

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
An addition benefit of my decision to remove the engine was gaining access to the exterior firewall . . . because I decided to install a Vintage Air kit in the car so that I could have heat, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) and removing the engine would give much better access to the firewall area to make installation of the entire HVAC system easier.

Here is a photo of the Vintage Air under-dash HVAC unit to be installed.

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