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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't know what to properly call them, but it's the pipes running along the inner fenders to the vent system. My passenger side is capped off because it has the cheap heater.

Anyway, question is:

the pipes are apparently 2 pcs and seamed. after removing them for sandblasting I noticed one seam had separated from the crimp. someone then applied some type of putty or sealer to close the gap. I'm wondering if I should experiment with home-made wood blocks or something and try to force the 2 sides to meet, and then perhaps rivets to secure them?
 

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If you are talking about the cented area, they don`t make one piece. There is a split there that is sealed by a rubber seal. The only part i can think of where a seam may have seperated would be the part on the back one that connects to the firewall.
Terry
 

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Trifive Automotive Electrical Wiring Expert
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Anyway, question is:
the pipes are apparently 2 pcs and seamed. after removing them for sandblasting I noticed one seam had separated from the crimp. someone then applied some type of putty or sealer to close the gap. I'm wondering if I should experiment with home-made wood blocks or something and try to force the 2 sides to meet, and then perhaps rivets to secure them?
Fresh Air Vents. The 2 halves have apparently been smushed to get the seam to come apart, so wedgeing some wood blocks inside the tube to expand them would probably work. Some rivits would be OK if you have room to get a rivit in the small flange. Welding or brazeing would also work fine.
http://www.trifive.com/garage/57%20Chevy%20Assembly%20Manual/1-13.gif
 

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As cheap as those are it would probably be easier to get another set than to repair those. Those you show are way too high. I`ve seen them a whole lot cheaper that that on ebay. I would call them the "air inlet ducts"
Terry
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
followup

Managed to get some hammer and dolly action to get the seam close and had just enough lip to accept small rivets--enough to keep it together anyway. Worse comes to worse I can lay a bead of silicone after paint is done. It's not a show car looking for 100 points, .so visually the seams are pretty much out of sight.

One more thing, does anybody have a trick for removing those flapper valves inside the vents? I lost sealing material after sanblasting.
 

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Trifive Automotive Electrical Wiring Expert
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Managed to get some hammer and dolly action to get the seam close and had just enough lip to accept small rivets--enough to keep it together anyway. Worse comes to worse I can lay a bead of silicone after paint is done. It's not a show car looking for 100 points, .so visually the seams are pretty much out of sight.

One more thing, does anybody have a trick for removing those flapper valves inside the vents? I lost sealing material after sanblasting.
You have to grind the spot welds off that hold the shaft to the flapper. Then you can pull the shaft, remove the flapper, grind or drill the rivits out that hold the 2 halves of the flapper together. I used close density foam to make a seal and bolted it back together. Weld or solder the shaft back on in the duck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You have to grind the spot welds off that hold the shaft to the flapper. Then you can pull the shaft, remove the flapper, grind or drill the rivits out that hold the 2 halves of the flapper together. I used close density foam to make a seal and bolted it back together. Weld or solder the shaft back on in the duck.
sounds like a plan, thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
You have to grind the spot welds off that hold the shaft to the flapper. Then you can pull the shaft, remove the flapper, grind or drill the rivits out that hold the 2 halves of the flapper together. I used close density foam to make a seal and bolted it back together. Weld or solder the shaft back on in the duck.
Just for info regarding these seals. This is the only place that I've found with repro fresh air duct flapper seals, if you don't make your own as acardon did.

http://www.mrnomad.com/product.asp?pid=1662&scid=71&wf=cat
 
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