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Hello everyone. I read the various threads about the flash time, etc. between primer, sealer, top coats. My question has to do with waiting days/weeks between these steps. Let's say I sand and shoot a sealer one weekend. Then the next weekend, I shoot the door jambs. Then maybe the next weekend I have time to shoot the base coat, etc. What would I have to do between these steps if for some reason I can't paint the whole car in one day? Are there any of these steps that can not be broken up? I'm leaning toward a BC/CC system but a single stage system is not out of the question either. This is just a daily driver.
 

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what ever you leave for a week to dry will need to sanded or at least have a scotch brite pad run over every thing. If you leave the base coat dry for a week you will have to sand it all and recoat it with base, followed by the clear the same day. :anim_25:
If all else fails read the instructions.:D
 

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Trifive Automotive Electrical Wiring Expert
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I agree with Bobby, you need to shoot the sealer through the clear coat in one day going by the directions flash times. I painted mine in sections though. I painted the firewall, A pillars and dash. Then the rear half. Then the doors and fenders. Then the hood and misc. parts.
 

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I agree with Don, if you can't shoot sealer, base, and clear in the same day or maybe overnight, you need to wait until you can.

Another thought is depending on your materials, you may be able to skip sealer completely. If you don't have sand throughs in your final coat of primer surfacer, and you use a quality 2k primer surfacer like PPG K36, you don't really need sealer.

And yet another thought. If you use a catalyst or activator in your base, the window that's required before the clear has to be applied can sometimes be extended.

Anything you can do to extend the window, and still avoid sanding, gives you some flexibility. But don't push it.

Whatever you do, stay within the mfr's recommedations on flash times and time windows on their p-sheets. That's your first line of info. Don't let anyone here tell you to violate those recommendations.

The minimum flash time is easy. You have to mix the reducer and catalyst for the next step anyway, plus maybe clean the gun. The maximum is not quite so easy. But if you plan, you can get it right.
 
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