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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m asking quite simply because in my 47 years, I have not experienced a new vehicle market like this. This in not intended to be a negative or bashing post on what I should (or may purchase) or why I should, or should not do this please. I will be vague. It is a big US brand (think Expedition/Suburban/Denali)

Simple background. I stager my vehicle purchases 10 years apart (Wife/Mine) Wife drives a 2012 Honda Odyssey (great vehicle in my experience) I drive a 2001 Grand Cherokee. Family dynamic – 2 kids 10/12 YOA boys getting bigger, 2 medium dogs. Primary use will be travel / road trips, parts gathering, some camping….maybe, maybe a boat down the line, but no crazy towing going on.

I put less than 6K in miles on the Jeep a year b/c I have a company work vehicle. Therefore, the new purchase will not see heavy mileage and although gas prices are a concern, they are not a major concern.

I will have to order a vehicle, plain and simple there is nothing on the lot/s. And what they occasionally have does not meet my requirements. I have already decided I will not pay for ceramic coating, nitrogen in wheels, wheel locks and the assorted general dealer mark ups. I have very good credit.

Here is my question. Is there anything else I need to nail down with the dealership? Beside a $1K deposit (not a problem) I have never ordered a vehicle. I still will attempt to play 3 dealers off against each other. I have been told there is no negotiation. I think that is BS. What I have been told is this, and I believe it:

Due to the shortage, Dealers have an allocated allotment (number of vehicles they can order per given period of time). Back order is approximately 4 months (been waiting 20 years...even 6 months is acceptable). Some vehicles are coming in missing options (although ordered) such as cordless charging pad (not a concern, b/c my phone is old as dirt), auto stop (on/off at a stop…could care less)…small stuff I don’t care about. I’m told dealer inventor is not coming back until 2024.

Anything I can negotiate, and trends? Pushing for a COSTCO $1000 discount. My 2001 really can only be sold independently. It has 127K on it and is in good condition. Thinking it is worth 3K for a high school kid who needs basic transportation.

And I ask here because I value the advice I have found here. If I could put this off one more year, I think I would. Wife says no, who knows what the economy will be, and we are forgoing time we could be enjoying a new vehicle. I just wonder how the dealers are doing it…how many 2021 models have they really sold? How many 2022’s do the think they will sell? Strange environment.
 

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I would wait the year if possible. putting low mileage, maybe a lease should be looked into.
 
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Welcome to the new world, I don't think it will matter if you wait or not. At least one of the big three in this country and I understand one or two european/asian makers are looking at going forward without a dealership network. You order your vehicle, make a deposit, arrange your financing and it gets delivered. Warranty issues will be dealt with by a contracted local garage.
 

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Unfortunately... if you can find something you want, you pay what THEY want to charge you. If you order what you want, you wait a long time and still pay what they want. My advice is shop around. Even shop out of your local area. Even look out of your state. You can do that online and usually get a better deal if you shop around. Best of luck and keep us updated.
Todd
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
This is something that has to be done but is not an emergency. I mean it's a 20 year old vehicle, there are issues...things are failing one at a time. Not big things, the engine does not burn oil the trans shifts. The exhaust is failing, power seats failing, heater/cooling blend doors are failing. Rear main seal leaks, valve covers leak. No check engine light, but the stereo is shot (heat/cold over 20 years). It's not the end of the world, but I have patched and fixed along the way. Unless I want to restore it, it's time. Still have the window sticker....but she will never be a tri five...
 

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I thought the days of ordering the exact vehicle you wanted at a negotiated price were already gone by for the most part even before the current situation.

Personally I would take a wide approach to this. Contact dealers about doing what you say you want and see what the reaction is. Keep in mind that the delivery date on an ordered vehicle may not be what you want, and probably out of the hands of the dealer anyway. The other thing to do is look for vehicles that already exist that you would accept - that you can buy today.

I think we're in this situation for a long time. Prices in the meantime will continue to rise. On the other hand, car dealers are not prospering in this environment either so you may find one or more that will work with you to get a sale.
 

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I just bought a new (2021) Chev Silverado LTZ with the Duramax engine and 10 speed transmission. It was one the dealer had ordered on his allocation and I paid MSRP + $2K dealer mark-up. I needed a truck and as I drive nothing but Chevrolets I did not look at others and there was little negotiation available as other new Chevrolet trucks were not available where I live. This is my first diesel engine vehicle and so far (1200 miles) I like it, I'm getting 26+ MPG, the engine has great torque and the transmission is smooth as silk. I reviewed some reports about the new 6 cylinder Duramax engine and transmission before I bought it, all were positive. I understand the Tahoe/Denali line of SUV's are also available with this engine transmission combination. I highly recommend you look at them... Al
Automotive parking light Wheel Car Tire Automotive side marker light
 

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I don't think the prices on new cars are going to be adjusted down at all. You're gonna pay sticker price...period. And if you want something that's tough to get, you might pay more than sticker price (like what's happened with the C8's). What might happen though, is that there will be more inventory.

I'm shopping for a new vehicle too and have mostly settled on a Honda Ridgeline or a Passport. I like the Passport more, but the utility of the Ridgeline keeps me coming back to it.

Anyway, the prices for new ones really aren't much higher than they were a year ago, you just have to wait if you want something that isn't on the lot for about 6 months. If you're not in a rush, I don't see this as a huge negative. I did consider buying a low mileage used one and that's where the sticker shock really is (i.e. in the used vehicle market). I can get into a brand new Passport or Ridgeline for about $36K (depending on options) with 0% financing. I can buy a used one with about 25K miles (or more) for about $31K. For the extra $5K and the full warranty, I'll go with the new one all day and twice on Sunday.

At some point, the valuations on used vehicles will correct themselves, but I think we're in this for at least another year.
 

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I think new vehicle prices will remain high and manufacturers will try to keep the inventory in their sweet spot where they are selling enough vehicles. There will inevitably come a point where the supply exceeds the demand and there will be room for negotiation. The price of used cars will follow suite (when similar new cars are available, used prices will decline).
At the end of the day: buy what you want when you want it/can get it. Your model of keeping cars 20 years means that you will be living with your choice for a long time and your cost is amortized over 20 years, so paying a bit on the high side isn’t a show stopper.
 

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I think new vehicle prices will remain high and manufacturers will try to keep the inventory in their sweet spot where they are selling enough vehicles. There will inevitably come a point where the supply exceeds the demand and there will be room for negotiation. The price of used cars will follow suite (when similar new cars are available, used prices will decline).
At the end of the day: buy what you want when you want it/can get it. Your model of keeping cars 20 years means that you will be living with your choice for a long time and your cost is amortized over 20 years, so paying a bit on the high side isn’t a show stopper.
Their on demand car sales model won't last long and they know it. They have about two or three years of this before it gets competitive again and chips catch up. This is a consequence of continuing to shut stuff down.

Newsflash: pandemic excuse is over folks. This is enduring (unlike masks), learn to live with it. Florida had minimal shut downs and is surpassing almost all other states in economic opportunities and supply chain availability. Btw, our "cases" are among the lowest in the U.S. and we aren't wearing face diapers everywhere.

Back to the OP, shop out of state, look outside of high tax states and maybe take a vacation and go pick it up.

That diesel Silverado looks awesome!
 

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The last three vehicles I have bought (Lexus RX350 (wife's), Toyota Corolla (daughter's) and my Expedition EL) were all "certified pre-owned" at their respective dealerships with extended or remaining manufacture's warranty. Each were one to three years old. Leased cars that came off lease. I shopped on "cars.com" for all three vehicles. I live in Alabama and all three were purchased in Georgia. In every case, I was not in a hurry to buy. I knew exactly what I wanted color, options, etc. An example of my purchase is in 2012 I bought my 2011 Expedition EL (the long version) with 20,000+ miles. I paid $29,000 for a one year old $50,000+ (new vehicle sticker price) with the remainder of the factory warranty. All three have served us well. For that kind of savings, I can forfeit that new car smell. ;)
 

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The last three vehicles I have bought (Lexus RX350 (wife's), Toyota Corolla (daughter's) and my Expedition EL) were all "certified pre-owned" at their respective dealerships with extended or remaining manufacture's warranty. Each were one to three years old. Leased cars that came off lease. I shopped on "cars.com" for all three vehicles. I live in Alabama and all three were purchased in Georgia. In every case, I was not in a hurry to buy. I knew exactly what I wanted color, options, etc. An example of my purchase is in 2012 I bought my 2011 Expedition EL (the long version) with 20,000+ miles. I paid $29,000 for a one year old $50,000+ (new vehicle sticker price) with the remainder of the factory warranty. All three have served us well. For that kind of savings, I can forfeit that new car smell. ;)
In normal times, you're right to buy a 1 to 4 year old car. But this isn't 2012...not even close. Right now, the 1-4 year old cars are not much cheaper than the brand new ones and they have less time/mileage on their warranties. I would usually agree that buying a new car is a waste of money, but right now, that's not the case. My GF has a 2016 Honda CRV that she bought used in 2018 with about 30K on odometer...despite the fast that it's now 3 years older and has about 15,000 more miles, she could still sell it for more than she paid for it. And I know that for a fact...when we went to the Honda dealer to test drive a new Passport, they offered us to buy it right there on the spot for about $2K more than paid for it in 2018 (and it's a base model too). That's how crazy the used car market is right now, especially if you have a car in high demand.

My point is that used cars are not depreciating much right now if at all...actually they've appreciated. This won't last, but if someone is going to keep a car for 15+ years (which is what I usually do too...I'm still driving a 2005 model as my DD right now), it doesn't matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Well it gets more interesting from my perspective. Went to two GM dealers and received similar stories. GM is basically shipping vehicles regardless of what you order. You will get the model and color, but some options selected may not make it into the build. No heated steering wheels, no electronic steering lock. Heated / cooled seats are not being shipped completed and you will need to have the dealer install parts at an unknown date. So you put a $1000.00 deposit down. If the car shows up without these or other options (cordless charging pads) you have the choice not to purchase. The dealer will put it on the lot and sell in a few days. So that makes looking at other vehicles more attractive.

Not spending 70-80K for something that does not meet my expectations out of the box. Not to mention interior color options are very limited. You can get a Suburban LT with a tan interior, but not the higher priced High Country, no tan, just brown or black. How does that make sense? It's the same interior, I could care less that the head rest is embordered with an emblems...just give me the interior color I want.

Disappointing. ....And who is to say they are not compromising quality? We will see what happens in the next 12-24 months. One dealer said, "We don't even have 2022 brochures because we have no idea what options we can get"

Likely worse one stated, "You have no idea, I have clients who trade in every 2-3 years on leases, now they are being asked to pay more with options they are accustomed to and we can't get the options on the vehicle."

Maybe these vehicles will be 100K shortly and at some point, regardless of financing, less people will be able to afford them. They will have to settle for other alternatives.
 

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I wouldn't buy right now unless I had no other options, and even then I'd buy used and take a smaller beating, then buy new in a year or two and get what I want.
 

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It never ceases to amaze how many so called Trifivers own non GM cars and trucks. There are over a dozen cars and trucks registered and tagged at my house and I have a token Ford. All the rest are products of General Motors. I would consider the last posters advice.
 

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It never ceases to amaze how many so called Trifivers own non GM cars and trucks. There are over a dozen cars and trucks registered and tagged at my house and I have a token Ford. All the rest are products of General Motors.
"so called trifivers"? So one has to completely drink the GM Kool-Aid and have blind brand loyalty to be a "real trifiver"? Give me a break LOL. They all make some good cars and they all make some junk. Smart move is to do your research and buy whatever brand/model works best for you, not to blindly be loyal to a corporation that doesn't care about you one bit. Brands love the "loyal" suckers who keep feeding them even when they make garbage.
 
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