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My '55 Delray that I built fifty five years ago weighed 2860. Small block, iron heads, Hilborns, M-22, '57 Olds rear axle, tube front axle with Willy's spindles, no front bumper, plastic side windows, 4-point roll bar, 75# battery in trunk, gutted interior, lightweight bucket seats. Car ran 11.21 @121 with the small block in C/Gas. Raced at the Winter Nationals in '67 with a big block but don't remember the weight. I have to weigh my current Delray, but expect it to be in the 3400# range.
But Fogger , the big issue here is " with you in it" , what does it matter without "you in it" !!!!!!!!!
 

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Factory published weights

I'm of the opinion that the factory listed weights are "dry weight", meaning no fluids such as gas, oil, diff & tranny grease, washer fluid, or brake fluid.
 

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Since NHRA has two methods of determining classes by weight, and neither involves the driver being in the cars, then it doesn't matter what the driver weighs.
For stock classes they use the factory shipping weight. Which does include fluids since cars aren't sent out that don't run and drive.
The non stock classes are simply weighed and then that weight is calculated on h.p. of the motor. So weight to h.p. ratio determines some classes.
In the days of the Gas Class it was vehicle weight to c.i. ratio.
No classes are based on driver's weight added.

"Stock Car Classification Guides
There are many classes within NHRA's Stock and Super Stock eliminators. Each class is defined by a ratio of vehicle shipping weight and a horsepower factor. The NHRA Stock Car Classification Guide is used to position a vehicle in its proper class."
 

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No classes are based on driver's weight added.
Been a while since you went to the races or read the rule book?

They started weighing the cars with the driver about 45-50 years ago. Weight requirements were revised at that time. Avoids needing a jockey for a driver.
 

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I raced my '55 in both C and B Gas classes into '67 at the Winter Nationals. Per the '67 NHRA rule book Gas classes were determined by weight to cubic inch. The OP asked what your hot rod weighs. Did I miss the request for driver weight? I'm sure that some posters weigh twice what they did at 18, LOL
 

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In 1967, they weighed the cars without the driver.

As I posted, about 45-50 years ago, call it the early 70s, they started weighing cars with the driver.

In most weight/cubic inch classes, 0.5 lb/in^3 was added. So let's say that in the 60s you were in a class that had to weigh 10 lb/in^3 and you had a 300 in^3 engine. The car without driver had to weigh 3000 lb. After the change to weighing with the driver, the weight break for the same class was 10.5 lb/in^3 and the car + driver had to weigh 3150 lb. Same class, same car. If you had a heavy driver you had to get some weight off the car to be spot on. If you had a light driver, you had to add some weight.

Stock and Super Stock cars were done similarly, except that an arbitrary amount of weight was added to calculate the minimum weight.
 

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Since NHRA has two methods of determining classes by weight, and neither involves the driver being in the cars, then it doesn't matter what the driver weighs.
For stock classes they use the factory shipping weight. Which does include fluids since cars aren't sent out that don't run and drive.
The non stock classes are simply weighed and then that weight is calculated on h.p. of the motor. So weight to h.p. ratio determines some classes.
In the days of the Gas Class it was vehicle weight to c.i. ratio.
No classes are based on driver's weight added.

"Stock Car Classification Guides
There are many classes within NHRA's Stock and Super Stock eliminators. Each class is defined by a ratio of vehicle shipping weight and a horsepower factor. The NHRA Stock Car Classification Guide is used to position a vehicle in its proper class."
Bout time all you guys with the goods get into it , always takes my frivolity to get the serious guys jacked up and into the discussion , your all welcome : )
Steve
 
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