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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Probably missed it somewhere in the forums, sorry. Searching the web I've seen almost contradictory advice on lifting the engine--as to using carb lift plate or head or exhaust or intake studs, etc.

I'm very hesitant about using the carb lift plate on my Edelbrock Alum manifold. Would appreciate some advice as to attach points and chain hook-up on my small block 350, 57 Belair. Also, should I remove the accel rod from firewall? All sheet metal is off front end, just basic block, heads and manifold sitting on chassis. Thanks, Mike
 

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If the heads have the accessory bolt holes in the ends, I like to use them.

Usually I use a tilt/hoist mechanism that has a chain on each end, so I connect one chain to each head in the front, and the other chain to each head in the back.

On accelerator linkage, it varies. Usually I disconnect the rod from the lever arm and let the lever arm swing up vertical so that it's on the firewall. It won't be in the way there.
 

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I've done it several ways, I have and use a lift plate that goes on the carb flange, I've used the tabs on the intake manifold that come on an engine from the manufacturer, and I've done it the way shown in the pic below. I would just say use long enough bolts to get a full 1 1/2 threads in which ever tapped holes you choose, I also use thick washers under the head. Good Luck

 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
lift plate

Troy

Was the carb lift plate used on cast iron manifold?

still wondering if I should trust the alum edelbrock for lifting. don't really want to spend 80 bucks on adjustable sling that I'll use once as opposed to carb plate that's just a few bucks.

I can go the pain-in-the-butt route by removing my edelbrock, replacing with old alum (cracked water flange) and then using carb plate. cost some new gaskets but I have to helicoil one head thread anyway.

btw, I'm using a pull chain hoist on a steel beam in my garage as opposed to a portable engine hoist-so i have to lift and push car back--yea yea I'm on a cheap budget
 

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I use a 4 strap sling that bolts to the exhaust port bolt holes(front and back). straps are on the side and spread apart, so it makes it easy to wiggle the engine back and fourth as well as side to side if needed.

You do need a bit of overhead room for it, but it does work well.
http://www.quartermax.com/details.php?prodID=775&searchType=keyword&searchTerm=engine sling

A person could fab something like this, if they were so inclined.
 

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I have used the intake bolts also and gone from the front on one side to the opposite corner in the rear. As Troy said, use washers and long enough bolts. I have used the carb plate too but never on an aluminum manifold. I bet you would have no problems though as long as the bolts are threaded in far enough. Just my 2 cents. Good luck!
 

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The strength of the aluminum manifold is fine as long as the threaded holes are in good shape and your fasteners are long enough. This is true of a cast iron manifold too.

Just the same I'd rather use the larger fasteners at the ends of the heads or that hold the intake or exhaust manifolds. Here too, you need to pay attention and make sure that there are enough threads and that the bolt isn't so long that you bend it.

So whatever you do, doing the fasteners right is important.
 

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I just pulled and replaced my small block with a new edelbrock intake using a lift plate had no problems at all. just make sure the bolts are plenty long. my tranny was not attached. I pulled it before the engine work began.
good luck
 

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Yes it was a cast iron manifold, but I've seen them on aluminum as well.

Troy

Was the carb lift plate used on cast iron manifold?

still wondering if I should trust the alum edelbrock for lifting. don't really want to spend 80 bucks on adjustable sling that I'll use once as opposed to carb plate that's just a few bucks.

I can go the pain-in-the-butt route by removing my edelbrock, replacing with old alum (cracked water flange) and then using carb plate. cost some new gaskets but I have to helicoil one head thread anyway.

btw, I'm using a pull chain hoist on a steel beam in my garage as opposed to a portable engine hoist-so i have to lift and push car back--yea yea I'm on a cheap budget
 

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I just put a 350 and 700r4 in my 55, using the carb plate on a stealth aluminum intake. No problems, have used this lifting method for several years with no problems at all. Most are rated at 1000 lbs. Just be sure as noted in prior posts to use long enough bolts and large washers. Good Luck. Gary
 

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For the engines that don't have the bolt holes in the ends of the heads (like all small block heads from 55-68, something I used to use was a factory bracket that came on many 60s engines. It was piece of 1/8" steel or maybe a little thicker that bolted on using two of the manifold bolts on the end of the manifold (in the water crossover area). Bolted there, and the other end had an eye. The bracket was bent so that they eye was vertical. I feel sure the factory must have used these to install the engine and just left them there. You could put one of these adjacent to the #1 cylinder and another adjacent to #8, or use 2 and 7 depending on what might have less obstacles for the chain. The eye was big enough for most any chain hook, or you could double chain it and just run a bolt through both end links.

When I had my first dragsters back in the 70s I'd put two of these on the engine so that when I wanted to pull it, they were there waiting.

I thought maybe I had a pair of these in my engine build drawer that I could take a pic of, but didn't find them. They may still be somewhere.

Anyway, just another way of getting some rigging on an engine.
 

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For the engines that don't have the bolt holes in the ends of the heads (like all small block heads from 55-68, something I used to use was a factory bracket that came on many 60s engines. It was piece of 1/8" steel or maybe a little thicker that bolted on using two of the manifold bolts on the end of the manifold (in the water crossover area). Bolted there, and the other end had an eye. The bracket was bent so that they eye was vertical. I feel sure the factory must have used these to install the engine and just left them there. You could put one of these adjacent to the #1 cylinder and another adjacent to #8, or use 2 and 7 depending on what might have less obstacles for the chain. The eye was big enough for most any chain hook, or you could double chain it and just run a bolt through both end links.

When I had my first dragsters back in the 70s I'd put two of these on the engine so that when I wanted to pull it, they were there waiting.

I thought maybe I had a pair of these in my engine build drawer that I could take a pic of, but didn't find them. They may still be somewhere.

Anyway, just another way of getting some rigging on an engine.
I have 4 of these that I've been using since the mid-eighties. Something your garage/tool box shouldn't be without. The best way to lift in my opinion.
 

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For the engines that don't have the bolt holes in the ends of the heads (like all small block heads from 55-68, something I used to use was a factory bracket that came on many 60s engines. It was piece of 1/8" steel or maybe a little thicker that bolted on using two of the manifold bolts on the end of the manifold (in the water crossover area). Bolted there, and the other end had an eye. The bracket was bent so that they eye was vertical. I feel sure the factory must have used these to install the engine and just left them there. You could put one of these adjacent to the #1 cylinder and another adjacent to #8, or use 2 and 7 depending on what might have less obstacles for the chain. The eye was big enough for most any chain hook, or you could double chain it and just run a bolt through both end links.

When I had my first dragsters back in the 70s I'd put two of these on the engine so that when I wanted to pull it, they were there waiting.

I thought maybe I had a pair of these in my engine build drawer that I could take a pic of, but didn't find them. They may still be somewhere.

Anyway, just another way of getting some rigging on an engine.
Yup what Rick said.... I took them off an old motor I had and keep them in my tool box drawer. I just don't trust the carb plate method. Just a stubborn old man I guess.

Don
 

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We like this method -



We used Blower Restraints bolted to the heads and straps to the balance bar-worked great!
 
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