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Discussion Starter #1
I an using a Longacre spindle mount camber/caster digital gauge. A couple of questions for someone who knows this alignment stuff.

I got the camber within 2/10ths of a degree positive I think. (The top leans out) Is that acceptable?

Is there any translation to the thickness of a shim to the degrees you see at the spindle?

What caster should I be looking for. Tubular arms, coil overs, disc brakes and power steering. It is at 4.5 degrees. Also, there is a 2/10th difference from left to right. Again, is this minute amount critical?

Thanks guys, Mark
 

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0.2° positive camber is within factory spec. Slightly negative actually helps cornering but don't get carried away.

4.5° positive caster is great if you have power steering. I like to have about 0.25° more positive caster on the passenger side - this counteracts the crown in the road. It does make a difference which side has fractionally more caster.

When you're talking about 0.2° differences, that's in the 1/32" shim category, about the thinnest shim commonly available.
 

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Am I reading your post correctly? You say you have within 2/10 of a degree of positive camber? If so that will be too much. It will cause extreme outer edge wear on the tires. If you have P/S the caster will be good. I always like 1/2 degree less caster on the left to compensate for the road crown.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
In looking at these specs, I guess I should be at 0 drivers side and -1/4 passenger side.

It is currently in the specs for an original front end. I guess that is not too bad. Add a couple more thin shims and I should be able to get it dialed in closer.
 

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The difference between what's in the chart and what I would do is probably worth discussing.

Chart says to split the camber, I assume for road crown. I prefer to split the caster as I suggested above. I don't know, maybe the camber works too, but it's an unusual spec.

Chart says toe in should be 1/8"=3/16". Radial tires certainly like less than that. Chevy also had a service bulletin when these cars were pretty new (way before radials) that changed the recommendation to 1/16"-1/8".

Chart suggests that the steering axis inclination is adjustable by front end alignment. It is not. It is determined by the machining of the spindle. The spindle has to be damaged for the steering axis inclination to change.

Chart gives numbers for toe angle while turning. This is a function of how the steering arms (and actually the whole chassis) are built. It is not adjustable - parts are damaged (or modified) if different.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yes, I pretty much disregarded everything after the caster specs in that chart. I ended up with 4.4 caster on the right, 4.2 on the left. I tried and tried to get 0 camber both sides, but the best I could do was 0 left side, and .05 negative on the right side. I am at 1/16th toe in. One thing I noticed was every time I set the caster, I would go to the camber. Then recheck the caster and it was different again. Back and forth a few times and finally got the numbers right. I can see where whatever you set, it is going to change after you drive it a little. I mean when you are talking 1/10th of a degree, a little tire wear, more or less air in a tire, a coil spring that settles a little....so I figure .05 off on one side isn't too bad. I am glad I had 1/64th shims. For me, 1/64th equaled 1 degree of camber, 1/32nd equaled 2 degrees and 1/16th equaled 4 degrees. Caster was more of a crap shoot. I liked using the Longacre turn plates and digital camber/caster gauge. They have an adapter that allows you to screw the gauge right onto the end of the spindle.
 
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