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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, my wife and I are talking about building a new house to get a bit out into the country. Yeah, prices on building supplies are going crazy, but prices on existing homes are even crazier thanks to the pandemic. Price vs. major routine repairs make buying a brand new house look not-so-bad versus buying a 15 year old house with original roof, furnace, A/C, etc.

Besides being a really pretty house, it will have a really nice big detached garage (in addition to the standard attached 2 car garage). But, as my wife...ummm...."reminded" me a few minutes ago, greasy, dirty garage floors will be a big no-no in either garage.

So, I'd like to hear specific (name-brands) of concrete sealers or paints you've found to work well in your shop.
 

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As an option if you have new concrete it can be directly sealed, if you are looking for color most have a two part epoxy mixed for long lasting effects
 

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Look into Racedeck flooring at racedeck.com
I installed it in my garage and love it. Less then a day to install and no prep work other then sweeping the floor. They have different colors and designs to choose from. If a piece gets damaged you can easily replace just that pice. The customer service is the best too. Contact them for free samples. These are not cheap plastic tiles. They hold up and are easy to clean.
Todd
 

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I love my epoxy costed floor, simple mop up for spills. It was the first thing done before anything went into the garage.
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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
A few more details about the detached garage:

The builder gave us a quote on the house itself a couple weeks ago. He just sent us the quote on the garage yesterday - 28' wide, 40' deep, story-and-a-half with a walk-up attic for storage. He's currently building the same thing as 28x36, and the architect designed the girders for the attic joists such that there are no posts required. (I wouldn't want to put engine blocks up there, but there's lots of lighter stuff that could be stored in the attic.) With a 10' tall, 18' wide garage door, you're talking a pretty nice setup.

The quote includes 100 amp electrical service, but does not include insulation and sheetrock. I priced the materials at Lowe's and Home Depot to get a rough idea of what that would cost.

Angs - what do you mean by "directly sealed"? Could you point me to some examples? (What you have available in Australia may not be available in the US, but there's probably something comparable here.)

Crowbarman - I really like the idea of Racedeck, but with over 1100 square feet of floor, the cost will add up. How well do these tiles stand up against jack stands or ramps?

Mr. Clean - that epoxy floor looks nice. Is it textured for good traction when wet? What brand did you use? How long has it been down? (It looks brand new.)

As my wife and I have thought about a move to get further out of town, we'd occasionally talk to other couples about it. She'd say with a grin, "we want a 2000 square foot house with a 4000 square foot garage". And, I would say with a grin, "no - 5000 square foot". :) Okay, so I'm not getting a 5000 square foot garage, but this is pretty nice for Saturday wrench-turning.

A big issue in the local real estate market is the detached garage. From time to time, you find a listing with a 1000 square foot detached garage. Unfortunately, it comes with a 4000 square foot house ($$$). Or, you can move way out in the country where there are no zoning restrictions, so you can do whatever you want. Unfortunately, that also means your neighbor can do whatever they want (killing the value of your property in the process). More than once, we've seen a gorgeous home out in the country, and a few doors down is a falling-apart single-wide mobile home with a yard that looks like the county dump.

Our initial plan was to find a house on about an acre with room for a separate garage. But, in the current market, if it's a house worth buying, you don't have time to see the house and check into the feasibility of building a garage before someone else has already put in an offer.
 

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Over the last 20 yrs, I've coated 4 garage floors (nearly 5000 sf total area) using Rustoleum PROFESSIONAL Epoxy floor coating with never any issues (other than the first ones I did not add in the 'grit', and when wet they are very slippery). With the added grit (even at 1/2 the recommended level), there is no slippage problem even when wet.

You MUST do the necessary prep (wash, etch, re wash/rinse, and DRY thoroughly) for the Epoxy to last, but doing it yourself, it's not very expensive in $$.. but does take you some time and probably will keep your vehicles out of the garage for a couple of weeks to allow time to do it!
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If you put a piece of plywood or something like that under the jack and jack stands and ramps there's no problem with Race deck. Also once you receive it and put it down, it's ready to use. There's no prep, there's no waiting and no smell.. When I did my garage it took less than a day.
I don't think race deck is any more expensive than a good epoxy if you take into account your time and labor.
Todd
 

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I coated both my new concrete garage floors with this product as soon as the concrete slabs were completely cured, and before the buildings were erected. I mopped it on the first one, let dry completely, then mopped a second coat. The only thing that has bothered it is battery acid. I sprayed it on the second garage floor using a garden sprayer. Mopping it was the better method. Since this dives into the concrete instead of laying on top, there’s nothing to chip or peel off. It dries clear, but color can be added. Available at Home Depot for about $16 a gallon. 2 gallon will put 2 coats on a 26x32 slab.



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nice! can I ask cost estimate Curt?
 

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I did my 24’ x 36’ garage for a little over $ 1,500.00. I bought the flooring a couple of years ago. I didn’t get around to putting it down until last summer. Covid project.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I did my 24’ x 36’ garage for a little over $ 1,500.00. I bought the flooring a couple of years ago. I didn’t get around to putting it down until last summer. Covid project.
GarageTrac® 48 Pack Garage Flooring – DIY Garage Floor Tiles lists GarageTrac at $2.54 per sq. ft.
Shop RaceDeck - RaceDeck Garage Floors lists their standard tiles at $3.40 per sq. ft.

beudean - is that sealant slippery when the floor is wet?

BamaNomad - is the grit you're referring to the color chips, or something else? The instructions I read said to roll a section, then sprinkle the color chips into it. (I didn't see any mention of other grit in the instructions.)

I have projects to get to this morning, so more later.
 

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When I bought mine, the GarageTrac was $2.09 p/sqft. I bought it on sale for $1.90. At that time the RaceDeck was running $3.79. They do occasionally run clearance sales with deep discounts if your not picky about color.
 

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Wow! Just went on BigFloors.com which is the retail site for SnapLoc industries and the prices have jumped a good bit in 2 years. The $3.40 for Racedeck price is on the Racedeck site only it is a 20% sale price from the reg. price of $4.25. They are now retailing the GarageTrac for $3.79. I guess it is like everything else with prices going out of site.
 

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beudean - is that sealant slippery when the floor is wet?
I 'sealed' my original detached garage with concrete sealer; it was NOT slippery because it soaks into the concrete pores. It 'helps' at least initially with cleaning up spills, but not sure how well it works long term...

BamaNomad - is the grit you're referring to the color chips, or something else? The instructions I read said to roll a section, then sprinkle the color chips into it. (I didn't see any mention of other grit in the instructions.)
The one I pictured was my neighbors' garage - she wanted the sprinkles. For my own garages, I didn't want the color sprinkles because I was concerned with finding small parts dropped on the floor, so I used the recommended sand (at about half the rate they suggest and it works great for anti-slippage)...
 

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Re; beudean2, is that sealer slippery when wet? No more than the epoxy coating that I had in a previous garage….which had grit applied to the surface while it was still wet. But, I did slip a little one time when I was running into the garage trying to escape a downpour. My slabs both have fiberglass fiber added in the cement mix when it was poured. The sealer helped seal the fibers down, and the fibers sitting on the surface helped add traction. My garages double as workshops, so the floor gets some abuse from jack and cherry picker steel wheels. A friend of mine has a Racedeck type floor covering and he hated it for working on because his cherry picker and jack was hard to roll on it when loaded.


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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
beudean2, this is very helpful. Your friend's experience with Racedeck is a consideration.

I hadn't elaborated on the purpose of the garage. This is not a combination man cave/mini-museum/social gathering place to watch football and action movies with the guys. This is for storing cars and working on cars. I don't plan to be working on cars (mine or other peoples') on a daily basis, even after I retire. But, the garage needs to be up to the task when I do.

If I were building the above-mentioned man cave, Racedeck would be the clear winner. It's the perfect look for such a place.

As far as the concrete, the builder spec'd 4 inches of 3000 PSI concrete. He didn't say anything about fiberglass, so I don't know about that.

BamaNomad - how well does the Rustoleum product stand up to jack wheels, jack stands, etc.? I'm guessing it does okay with drippings during oil changes and solvents (such and mineral spirits) for cleaning up the mess.
 

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BamaNomad - how well does the Rustoleum product stand up to jack wheels, jack stands, etc.? I'm guessing it does okay with drippings during oil changes and solvents (such and mineral spirits) for cleaning up the mess.
I've had no such damage from floor jacks, engine hoists, etc... and both are used pretty regularly in my shops. Also, I've had no 'hot tire pickup', which is another problem reported with some epoxy coatings. The only damage I've had in 20 yrs is lifting from a battery acid leak from an old corvette I had sitting in my basement for a few years.

If you properly clean, prep, and DRY your concrete and follow the directions, I think you will be very happy with the Rustoleum Professional Epoxy. Note that Rustoleum has a lower grade epoxy coating that I have no experience with!


Here is where I purchased mine (best price found)... with free shipping to your address:
 
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