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I recently talked to a tech who said the main advantage to Dex-Cool coolant and why Chevy went to it is the reduction in electroloysis in aluminum components. He said it would be a great coolant in tri-five using aluminum radiators, heads, etc. What do you think?
 

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Dex Cool should only be used in cars that are designed to bleed of the air out of the system.
Only the newer cars have this.
Dex Cool will coagulate when mixed with air over time. Not good.
It is also not for copper/brass radiators.

If you have an aluminum radiator and have put in a newer type of engine, like an LT1 or LS1 that has the bleed on it, then it would be OK.
 

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Are you saying only use dex-cool in cars with radiator recovery system installed ?
It's more complicated than that. Rick probably has the best advice.

Here's an explanation I found on the net that describes how the LT1 is designed to remove air from it's cooling system:

"Corvette and B/D-car LT1 applications use a pressurized coolant recovery reservoir instead of a non-pressurized overflow tank used with conventional cooling systems. All of the coolant flows continuously through the pressurized reservoir, which is an integral part of the cooling system. The pressurized reservoir in the LT1 B/D-cars is connected to the cooling system in three places. One inlet hose connects to the top of the RH radiator tank, a second inlet hose is attached through a "tee" connection on the heater inlet hose, and a third outlet hose is connected to a "tee" connection in the throttle body heater outlet.

The pressurized reservoir is mounted at the highest point in the system, and provides a place where all air can be continuously scavenged from the coolant. Any steam and bubbles are allowed to rise to the surface, eliminating foam and providing pure liquid coolant back to the engine. Pure liquid coolant is returned to the system via the heater outlet hose connection. The pressure relief/vent cap in these systems is rated at 15-psi and is located on the reservoir rather than the radiator.

LT1 F-cars use a conventional coolant recovery system that consists of a non-pressurized coolant overflow tank connected to the radiator by a single hose. These cars use an 18-psi rated pressure relief/vent cap on the radiator like most conventional systems. Since these cars cannot scavenge air from the coolant as well as the B/D-car or Corvette systems, they have two air bleeder valves for manually bleeding trapped air from the system. One is in the thermostat housing, which is the same as all other LT1 engine vehicles, and the second one is located in a "tee" where the coolant from the throttle body connects to the heater return hose."
 

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Don't put that crap in anything unless it is under warranty. Once it is out of warranty get that junk out. GM had a class action lawsuit because of it eating gaskets and aluminum heads.
 

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That stuff is junk. I took it out of my 57. It looked good when it first came out, but many miles tater it is crap. I would not use it in anything I drive.
Jeffrey
 

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Don't put that crap in anything unless it is under warranty. Once it is out of warranty get that junk out. GM had a class action lawsuit because of it eating gaskets and aluminum heads.
I drain that crap out as soon as the warrenty is up. I have a real LT1 intake on my 67 camaro for 30 plus years and it shows no adverse effects from the old green stuff.
 
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