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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello everyone, would somebody be so kind as to share the secrets of hanging a door. im restoring a '56 chev 210 2d. stationwagon and I had both doors off for paint. I put the pass. side door on with no problem but boy, am I struggling with the driver side door. I've tried every combination possible with the hinges and it looks like who did it and left it. The front appears to fit proper but the back hangs down. The top of the door is actually slightly below the rubber grommet which is not even close to being good. It seems that I can't get the rear lift that I need. I know it fit and opened because I took pictures of it assembled. Any help suggestions would be really appreciated. Many thanx.
 

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Trifive Automotive Electrical Wiring Expert
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When fitting a door, you have to start with adjusting it to the quarter panel and rocker. These are not moveable, so the door has to fit them. The front fender is then adjusted to the door and cowl. A trick I've used it to loosen the hinges, close the door with paint sticks in the gaps. You can tape short pieces of paint sticks to the B pillar and rocker and close the door. Then tighten the hinge bolts. This will get you close. Then I mark the hinges with masking tape and adjust a little at a time to get the gaps I want. By marking the hinge, you can see how far your moving the door, so when you move it too far, you can get it back to where it was. :anim_25:
Can you post pictures of what it looks like?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Don for your response and direction. I'll try to post some pictures but I apology in advance because I'm really not computer literate. Carmine
 

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I lined mine up using Don's trick. Loosen the hinges, tighten them enough to barely hold in place (but the door will still move around), close the door. If the screws were loose enough to allow the door to move, then when you close it, it sort of "self aligns". When you open it, the hinges will pretty much be where they need to be. Tighten (only enough to hold), close again, and make minor adjustments from there. Actually works pretty well. Got mine aligned without much trouble at all.

Roger
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I'd like to share this with everyone and its in re. to door hinge adjustment. Everyone was very helpful to me with my problem but I just couldn't get the door adjustment I needed. I then looked at a repo booklet on body alignment/adjustments and they had a photo of exactly what my doors were doing. Basically, depending on your issue, you either add or take away body shims at various points. I never thought this would work because of the body being welding together but I'm here to tell you, that it does. The booklet is sold by Danchuk. The doors look great and many thanx to those who offered advice, Carmine
 

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Glad to see things worked out. Just to add a note which may be useful to someone else sometime: Using heavy cardboard strips- boxes that are used for shipping appliances for instance- instead of stir strips is a good option as the cardboard will "give" slightly and enable you to shift the door into the desired position before securing the bolts.
 

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A friend of mine couldn't get the left fender to line up. After fighting it for a long time he ask me about it. after some discussion ,I told him to check the body mounts on the frame. sure enough the left front mount was welded on the frame 1/2 inch lower than it should have been. shimmed the mount, problem solved.:bowtier:
 

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Used cardboard to align things when trial fitting the trunk lid and (2DHT) doors just this morning. Glad I read this thread just last night!
 
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