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I'm putting in an 230vac outlet receptacle. Is their a receptacle that you can have both 230vac and 120vac within the same plug so when I need 120vac I don't need to have an extra outlet.
 

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Yes. You need a two gang box, both a 220v and 110v outlet, and a proper two gang trim plate. Not all that hard to do depending on application.
 

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Technically 230V outlets do not have an insulated neutral needed for 120V
Correct, and the adapters are not usually UL approved. They will work, but I'd prefer to simply have a second outlet and only use the adapter on the cord as a temporary short term solution.
 

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plus your putting two different fused circuits into one box. very risky to say the lease. And not code approved. Just my opinion as a retired 40 plus year Electrician...
I know little to nothing about electrical circuitry, closer to nothing, but that does sound a little dangerous to me. I would rather have a separate box for two different circuits. But, that's just me, Carmine.
 

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plus your putting two different fused circuits into one box. very risky to say the lease. And not code approved. Just my opinion as a retired 40 plus year Electrician...
Depends on location maybe, but I’ve never heard of that out here. Think about the typical kitchen 2 gang. It has at least two different circuits, and custom homes with 3 or 4 gangs have even more. Even in commercial applications it’s really common to have more than one circuit in the same box.
 

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Yes. You need a two gang box, both a 220v and 110v outlet, and a proper two gang trim plate. Not all that hard to do depending on application.

EDIT...
Just realized that I forgot to say that you’ll need two separate circuits in order to make this work legally. It is possible to do it in a ‘huckleberry’ way with just one 240v circuit, but not proper and not recommended.
 

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Depends on location maybe, but I’ve never heard of that out here. Think about the typical kitchen 2 gang. It has at least two different circuits, and custom homes with 3 or 4 gangs have even more. Even in commercial applications it’s really common to have more than one circuit in the same box.
Same here Dan. The code doesn't say anything about having multiple circuits in one box, as long as everything is fused according to code. If it was an issue we'd be in deep doo doo with large control panels having huge numbers of different circuits in one enclosure.
Under 250v., and over 250v. in the same enclosure is a big no-no, unless there's an approved divider.
 

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Same here Dan. The code doesn't say anything about having multiple circuits in one box, as long as everything is fused according to code. If it was an issue we'd be in deep doo doo with large control panels having huge numbers of different circuits in one enclosure.
Under 250v., and over 250v. in the same enclosure is a big no-no, unless there's an approved divider.
Understood. Think about MCC panels though. Many times there’s 480, 277, 208, and even 120 in the same enclosure with no dividers. We both know it happens all the time, yet technically is illegal..?
 

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Understood. Think about MCC panels though. Many times there’s 480, 277, 208, and even 120 in the same enclosure with no dividers. We both know it happens all the time, yet technically is illegal..?
I can't recall the code sections and rules on that sort of thing with control panels? I know I had a large lighting control panel that was full of 277v. lighting circuits, and 120 v. control relays, but didn't have a control transformer to step down to operate the relays, so the maker had built it with a divider between the 277 v. terminals, and the 120v. switching below. That was back in the 1980's when I wired those one per floor in a 42 story office building. I just remember them needing the metal divider for whatever reason?
I've seen lots of mag starters on overhead cranes and other equipment that had various voltages in the same mag starter. Figured it was because one disconnect killed the whole piece of equipment that made it legal.
Isn't there something about different spacing for clearances around 480v vs. 250v?
 

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Depends on location maybe, but I’ve never heard of that out here. Think about the typical kitchen 2 gang. It has at least two different circuits, and custom homes with 3 or 4 gangs have even more. Even in commercial applications it’s really common to have more than one circuit in the same box.
Its a series/parallel circuit, one feed going to multiple branches like lights and outlets. But in a kitchen and dinning room all your outlets are 20 amp and your lighting is 15 amps
 

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Understood. Think about MCC panels though. Many times there’s 480, 277, 208, and even 120 in the same enclosure with no dividers. We both know it happens all the time, yet technically is illegal..?
277volt is a red leg panel and identified as such with an orange marking on that leg. usually a 3 phase panel.
 

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What Max46 wants to do is have a 230vac and 120vac in the same outlet box. So with out a neutral on the 230 v side he will need a separate circuit with a neutral for the 120v side. which will each have there own breaker and one will be hot if you only turn one breaker off and open that outlet box if its not a divided box.
 

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277volt is a red leg panel and identified as such with an orange marking on that leg. usually a 3 phase panel.
277 can be brown, orange, or yellow. In an MCC cabinet there can be any or all of the colors above, plus black red and blue, and even black, red, blue, pink, or purple for control devices. Many MCC cabs have all of the above inside of just that cabinet, and not divided apart by much if anything.

Of course all of the above has nothing to do with Max. For him it’s best to have a 110 circuit for his wanted convenience outlet, and another 2 pole circuit for whatever it is that it runs. Doing it that way would be safest and legal, and it CAN be in the same box if wished so.

You or me could get something to work by using what he already has, but it would be a real hillbilly way of doing things, and for sure not legal.
 

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get an electrician in, safety first.
 
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277volt is a red leg panel and identified as such with an orange marking on that leg. usually a 3 phase panel.
I think you're confusing a grounded Delta transformer feed with a Y transformer that's center tapped to ground to make 277/480. On a Delta tapped transformer two legs read lower to ground, while the wild leg or high leg is marked or identified as the wild leg. In a 277/480 all 3 legs read equally to ground, and as mentioned are colored brown/orange/yellow, without regard to which leg is A-B-C phase.
 

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I think you're confusing a grounded Delta transformer feed with a Y transformer that's center tapped to ground to make 277/480. On a Delta tapped transformer two legs read lower to ground, while the wild leg or high leg is marked or identified as the wild leg. In a 277/480 all 3 legs read equally to ground, and as mentioned are colored brown/orange/yellow, without regard to which leg is A-B-C phase.
Known as “stinger leg” around here. I hate that setup, and glad that it’s dying out. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve had to correct the situation after someone burnt a piece of equipment to heck. And even have run into situations of finding high volt to convenience outlets! Can you imagine the results of that if the unknowing plugs something in?!!
 

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I only saw the grounded delta wild leg systems in commercial or industrial complexes here. The one that I really disliked was the ungrounded delta systems many plants used! They always had three indicator lights above the service to show if any legs ever got grounded. It was a big issue if there was ever a light glowing, or burning at any level, and often took days to discover where that leg had somehow gone to ground.
 
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