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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering if any of you use E85 in your late model vehicles. I have an '07 Impala that is E85 compatible, but has only had a few tanks of E85 run through it. Maybe I am a bit cautious, but not sure if the judge and jury has been out on this topic yet. When I have run it, I usually lose about 4-5 mpg, but the lower cost offsets it where I am actually money ahead.

Any comments?
 

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Just wondering if any of you use E85 in your late model vehicles. I have an '07 Impala that is E85 compatible, but has only had a few tanks of E85 run through it. Maybe I am a bit cautious, but not sure if the judge and jury has been out on this topic yet. When I have run it, I usually lose about 4-5 mpg, but the lower cost offsets it where I am actually money ahead.

Any comments?
Mike
myself I dont use it, but I dont even know any one that does around our parts<town> as locally they dont really carry it, hav to travel about 50 miles round trip.
does anyone carry it locally for u?, dont really see any issues, except for mileage, and its cheaper as u stated
 

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I have a 09 chevy 1/2 ton and run it whenever I can. I drop maybe a mile per gallon. saving about .55 per gallon though. My daughter's boyfreind just finished up schoo at Ferris state U and that is one one of the best schools for auto tech out there now and he said that running E85 once a month will keep the injectors clean. The problem I have is the closest station that carries it is 20 miles away.
 

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E85 needs to cost about 65% of what gasoline fuel costs, just to even out the loss of mileage. I'm usually paying just less than $2.50/gallon today, so E85 would need to be at $1.62 just to break even with regular. I've never seen it even close to that low. If you're comparing to a higher octane gasoline, that now sells for $2.70 or so - so the E85 would need to be around $1.75.

That's before you get into any discussion about performance or availability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It is readily available in my area. My biggest concern is wondering if there could be any long term problems. Hate to save a few bucks now and have it cost me down the road!!! Still appreciate any comments, especially from someone who has used it for a long time.
 

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"Because ethanol contains less energy than gasoline, fuel economy is reduced for most 2002 and earlier American FFVs (flexible-fuel vehicles) that are currently on the road by about 30% (most after 2003 lose only 15-17%, or less) when operated on pure E85 (summer blend). Some of the newest American vehicles can lessen this reduction to only 5-15%, but as recently as 2007 the Environmental Protection Agency stated on its website that several of the most current American FFVs were still losing 25-30% fuel efficiency when running on E85. Some Swedish engineered cars with engine management systems provide much better fuel economy on E85 than on gasoline; for example, the Saab Aero-X turbocharged concept car produces higher fuel economy and higher power on 100% ethanol (E100) than gasoline through using a higher compression ratio engine with advanced SAAB engine control computers. Another car that has higher power on ethanol is the Koenigsegg CCXR, which on ethanol is the third most powerful production car with 1020 hp. This according to the manufacturer is due to the cooling properties of ethanol. Still, for almost all American-made FFVs, more E85 is typically needed to do the same work as can be achieved with a lesser volume of gasoline. This difference is sometimes offset by the lower cost of the E85 fuel, depending on E85's current price discount relative to the current price of gasoline. As described earlier, the best thing for drivers to do is to record fuel usage with both fuels and calculate cost/distance for them. Only by doing that, can the end-user economy of the two fuels be compared.

For example, an existing pre-2003 model year American-made FFV vehicle that normally achieves, say, 30 MPG on pure gasoline will typically achieve about 20 MPG, or slightly better, on E85 (summer blend.) When operated on E85 winter blend, which is actually E70 (70% ethanol, 30% gasoline), fuel economy will be higher than when operating on the summer blend. To achieve any short-term operational fuel cost savings, the price of E85 should therefore be 30% or more below the price of gasoline to equalize short term fuel costs for most older pre-2003 FFVs for both winter and summer blends of E85. Life-cycle costs over the life of the FFV engine are theoretically lower for E85, as ethanol is a cooler and cleaner burning fuel than gasoline. Provided that one takes a longterm life-cycle operating cost view, a continuous price discount of only 20% to 25% below the cost of gasoline is probably about the break-even point in terms of vehicle life-cycle operating costs for operating most FFVs on E85 exclusively (for summer, spring/fall, and winter blends).

Fuel economy in fuel-injected non-FFVs operating on a mix of E85 and gasoline varies greatly depending on the engine and fuel mix. For a 60:40 blend of gasoline to E85 (summer blend), a typical fuel economy reduction of around 23.7% resulted in one person's carefully executed experiment with a 1998 Chevrolet S10 pickup with a 2.2L 4-cylinder engine, relative to the fuel economy achieved on pure gasoline. Similarly, for a 50:50 blend of gasoline to E85 (summer blend), a typical fuel economy reduction of around 25% resulted for the same vehicle. (Fuel economy performance numbers were measured on a fixed commute of approximately 110 miles roundtrip per day, on a predominantly freeway commute, running at a fixed speed (62 mph), with cruise control activated, air conditioning ON, at sea level, with flat terrain, traveling to/from Kennedy Space Center, FL.). It is important to note, however, that if the engine had been specifically tuned for consumption of ethanol (higher compression, different fuel-air mixture, etc.) the mileage would have been much better than the results above. The aforementioned fact leads some to believe that the "FFV" engine is more of an infant technology rather than fully mature.

The amount of reduction in mileage, therefore, is highly dependent upon the particulars of the vehicle design, exact composition of the ethanol-gasoline blend and state of engine tune (fuel air mixture and compression ratio primarily)."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E85#Fuel_economy
 

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I run only E-85 in my "Blue Oval" F-150 5.4L. I lose approx. 2 mpg. I experimented when it was new both in town and on the highway so the fuel economy is accurate. Sunday I paid $2.06 while gas was $2.79 so my savings is currently 26% with a loss of fuel economy of 13%. My truck runs much better on the alcohol (so do I!!:beer:) with a noticable power increase and much better throttle response. In the corn belt we have E-85 available in almost every town around. To me it is a no-brainer to use E-85 if you own a FFV. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for your comments. Wow, Chevynut, I had to read your comments twice to grasp the knowledge!!! Think I will try to run it for a month or so straight just to get an accurate comparison. Thanks again.
 

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I know its not a popular topic but from what I read, at our present rate of consumption, the known oil reserves in the world will run out before 2040, That may seem like a long way off to many, But long before gasoline is gone, the price will be so high, most of us will not be able to afford it.
Gary
Weren't we supposed to run out in the late 70's too? LMAO!!! :sign0020:
 

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at our present rate of consumption, the known oil reserves in the world will run out before 2040, That may seem like a long way off to many, But long before gasoline is gone, the price will be so high, most of us will not be able to afford it.
Gary
The Athabasca Oilsands in Alberta Canada have over a 100 years of Oil.. 1.7 Trillion barrels..more proven oil reserves than the Middle East and no Kingdoms or Islamic regimes to suck up to. They are available and cost effective at the present level of gas prices. Im doing the finishing touches on a 13 billion dollar Upgrader right now for Shell Oil and we put over 10 thousand men and women to work at good paying jobs from all over North America building it the last 3 years. I had tradesmen from Texas to Minnesota on my crews..excellent Union workers with pride in safety / quality and productivity.
 

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e85

I run e 85 in my 57, it has a 540 supercharged,love it a lot cheaper than race gas! plus its a very cool fuel! summer blend is like 105 octane, witch is nice for the higher octane guys! not much to change over little work to the carb, and a good fuel pump! for the high performance guys you'll burn about 30 percent more fuel. they even sell carburetors already set up for e 85
 

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Took a roadtrip from down south up to MN & ND. Decided to try e85 in my Yukon, cheaper and all. I swear I could watch my gas gauge headed toward 'E' twice as fast, maybe it was in my mind...

especially after reading Chevynut's explanation. Thanks
 
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