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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay guys I need advise.

I am installing a ramjet on my big block.

So now I need to put an electric fuel pump for the efi.

Have been doing some research.

If I use an external electric fuel pump, which one is the quietest.
Does an external; pum,p require a regulator and return line etc.

Has anyone modified a fuel tank with an internal fuel pump.

If I use an exteranl or internal fuel pump do I need a fuel return line
all the way back to the fuel tank in all setups.

Has anyone used a a surge tank.

has anyone used a piston driven fuel pump.
Race Pumps Piston Fuel Pump - EFI - Big Block Chevy


If you have answers I appreciate all the details on products used etc.


Thanks

otis
 

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Otis, I'm pretty sure that you are going to have to run a return line no matter what pump you use. I thought that the ram jet had a factory type fuel rail that has a feed and return set up on it. As far as pump go I'm a big fan of the Magna fuel stuff. A little pricey but good quality stuff. What tank do you have?

JB.
 

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A return depends on the system design.
You could run the reg at/near the tank, return the fuel there, and have just 1 feed to the rails. [Deadhead system]
You can run the feed to the rails, then to the reg and then back to the tank.
A Walbro GS392 is an external pump that would feed what you need.
Take a look on the Aeromotive site. They have layouts of how a system is plumbed.

That Race pump U refer to......FORGET IT!
 

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I'm with JB55, I think the Ram Jet comes with a fuel rail mounted regulator that has a return line port. If you use that, you need a return line.

I suppose you could also modify the fuel rail to get rid of the pressure regulator, then run the LS1 Corvette fuel filter/regulator setup. That mounts near the tank, and requires a short return line back to the tank.

A 255 liter/hour Walbro pump is probably the best choice, either in line or in the tank.

A couple of guys here have the Tanks Inc. tank and pump conversion and have commented favorably.

On the high end you could get a stainless tank from Rock Valley or Rick's Hot Rod.

I've heard of surge tank setups but I've never seen one, and they can be troublesome I hear. You'll need a 2nd low pressure pump with it.

Whatever you choose, you need to have the tank baffled or sumped so that the fuel pickup is always covered. Otherwise your engine will miss when you go around a corner or accelerate or stop quickly when the tank is somewhere below 1/2 full.
 

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try this

Not sure what fuel line size you need but if your system will work on 3/8 try this combo (What I'm going to use.)
Rock Valley stainless tank with internal pump
LARGE F.I. filter
2- 3/8 repo fuel line mounted one above the other
one pressure one return with a 2 line y carb splitter on front end of car to fuel rails . with a aeromotive 2 port pressure regulator on out let side of rails with one return line. Will use -8 line from tank to filter -6 for rest of system. I don't like rubber lines the length of the car. Use the most hard line possible espesially if you ever think abut using e-85.
BTW I don't think you use a surge tank in an efi injected car. Those are for a mechanical only fi setup with an engine mounted pump.

:anim_25
 

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I'm running a msd 2225 external pump it is noisy ( can hear it when not moving ) one thing is once the stock unbaffled tank gets to about 2 gallons left it will uncover the pickup tube and the car will stall or stumble when making a fast turn or going up a steep hill/fast take off. I used the existing 5/16" fuel line as a return line and teed it into the tank vapor port near where the filler tube goes into the tank. and ran a 3/8 line from the pickup tube to pump then used a ac delco Gf 487 fuel filter it has a 3/8" hose inlet and a inverted flare fitting on the outlet that connects to the 3/8" steel line.

My future plans is to buy a tank with a internal pump when I get all the pieces for a multiport setup together.

Regards, Robert
 

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The BBC Ramjet has ONE fuel rail down the center that feeds both sides of the engine. As mentioned, it also has the pressure regulator on it that has a fitting for a return line. You can buy an aftermarket fuel rail that can be configured any way you want it as far as regulator, etc.

I went with dual 3/8" stainless fuel lines on mine all the way from the pump to the engine. To me, that seems like the best way to do it so you always get the right pressure at the engine. I built my pump unit too, using a Walbro 255 lph pump.







 

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Here's a pic of the fuel rail and injector wiring. I'm using a Holley Commander 950 that's inside the car. The regulator is just to the right of the distributor and both fuel lines come off back there.

 

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If using the Vette reg/filter, the relief is set @ 58psi.
Does the Ramjet use injs flow rated at 43.5 or 58??
 

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If using the Vette reg/filter, the relief is set @ 58psi.
Does the Ramjet use injs flow rated at 43.5 or 58??

43.5. I think Otis is going to have to use a programmable controller anyhow, so does the pressure really matter as long as it's constant? All he has to do is adjust the pulse width, right?
 

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The 58 psi vs. the 43.5 psi thing went right by me when I suggested that.

You could re-program the fuel to compensate, but that an awful lot of work for little benefit.
 

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Fuel Pump

I went though this process three years ago. We installed
a Vette LS-1 / 6 Speed in my "56. I needed a new fuel
tank so We called Rock Valley re a fuel tank, fuel lines,
and fuel pump.

Rock Valley told my to install two fuel lines to the engine,
feed and return. They also told me to use the "In-Tank"
pump. I was told that since pump runs full time and the
pump must be in the tank, the fuel "cools" the fuel pump!

Makes pefect sence, but - fuel pump in a tank...

GM Engineers did this for good reasons !!

So, I ordered and installed their Stainlees Steel fuel tank
assembly. The install was simply.

However, bending 3/8 inch stainless steel fuel line is not
so simple. We installed the Corvette fuel filter along the
frame rail just behind the cross member.

The system works perfect with no problems in Hot weather
or slow traffic.

I'm happy !

Good Luck with your fuel system...

Michael.....
 

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As far as bending and flaring stainless steel tube, using the right materials and tools makes it far easier.

Inline Tube (and others) sells tubing that's been annealed correctly. It's much easier to flare and bend than the SS tube that most local metal suppliers stock. A good flaring tool and a good bending tool and you're in business.
 

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Fuel pressure?

I think my Holley 950 program is setup for 43.5 psi. Better check with Holley for the correct pressure before using one of their programs for a base setup. might not be enough pulse width availlable for that much flow change. Does an injector overheat from long pulse width?

One more thing you'll need the upgrade fuel pump to make the 58 psi.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the info, please keep it comming, I know I can't be the only one that's thinking about going fuel injection and we need advice and help especially how to do it the safest and hopefully the cheapest way, I know safe and cheap are 2 differant things but lets try.

A lot of guys are using the external pump and that's fine but I can't stand the noise they make, gets on my nerves, ( old age ).


Thanks

Otis :)
 

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Otis, since you don't like the noise, consider this - the in tank setup is more reliable and has the baffling too. So I'd steer you toward either the Tanks Inc. tank conversion or the Rock Valley tank conversion. Or the SS tanks if you're willing to spend the $$$.

If anyone can build and sell one cheaper and come out on the $$, I'm sure it would be a welcome product. Right now the only cheaper way out is to graft an OEM setup to a stock tank yourself. A friend of mine did that with the pieces from a 3rd gen Camaro tank and a 57 tank that had been boiled out/cleaned at a radiator shop. That was for a 43.5 psi setup, but you could do a 58 psi setup just as easily. I'm not sure how much he really saved. Since tanks are galvanized, you have to remove that where you weld. Then you have to deal with the fact that the galvanized area is not there in the weld area. Done right, regalvanized or stainles, does add cost.
 
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