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Hey Mark, sorry you couldn't make it today we will have to catch up another time.
Look up Castlemaine Auto Electrics in Victoria, they will have a set for you. From memory I think they cost a little over $750. Email them to make sure that they have the right ones for your car as they do a lot of different ones for a 57, also for a RHD.
 

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If the transmission frame horns are removed, and assuming it's a small block, most HK, T, G pipes go straight in. I used a set of swap meet Genie brand. Just be aware of some of the differences... Eg: HK pipes might be intended for a 153T starter set up and interfere with the starter if using the large diameter set up. Swap meet hunting will turn up (fairly small primary - prob 1 5/8) pipes for less than $100 some times. Mine are like new and were $60. I'm guessing they were intended for a manual so required some slight modification for transmission pan clearance. Hope that helps...
 

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Hey Mark, I was talking to the guys at Chev Power in Maddington and they put me onto a company called Autopace Distributors in Cockburn that do extractors. So I went over there this morning to get some gaskets for my extractors and was talking to the owner. He said that they would do a kit and you just take it home and set it up before you fully weld it, that way it would fit the car the way you want because it's hard to find a set on the shelf that will fit. Price wise I think he said in the ball park of about $600.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hey Mark, I was talking to the guys at Chev Power in Maddington and they put me onto a company called Autopace Distributors in Cockburn that do extractors. So I went over there this morning to get some gaskets for my extractors and was talking to the owner. He said that they would do a kit and you just take it home and set it up before you fully weld it, that way it would fit the car the way you want because it's hard to find a set on the shelf that will fit. Price wise I think he said in the ball park of about $600.
Cheers Dean I will look them up
 

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Not quite correct.

Yep there called exractors in Australia. Im sure some ppl over here call them headers and I wouldn't think they would make them to suit in the US for rhd.
G'day,

SOME people over here incorrectly call them "extractors", but most of the people with whom I mix refer to them by their proper name, headers. The confusion evolved, as I understand, from back in the days when the most popular cars sold in Australia were British four cylinder models and fitting an "extractor" exhaust was one way to boost the mediocre power output.

My understanding is that the term "extractor" is correctly applied to a (four) cylinder head which has exhaust pulses 180 degrees apart. It is possible to "pair" two exhaust ports whose cylinders fire 180 degrees apart. Twice of course. All four cylinder engines with four exhaust ports have this capability, but V8 engines with a dual plane crankshaft do not. Therefore the term is inaccurate when applied to a V8 with a dual plane crankshaft, as are all mass produced US and Australian V8 engines over the last 70 plus years.

For the same reason the term is inaccurate when applied to six (or even five) cylinder engines, the former having exhaust pulses at 120 degree intervals. The only way to have a true "extractor" exhaust manifold on a V8 is to "pair" the cylinders that are 180 degrees apart. On a Chev that would be 1 and 4 or 7, 2 and 8 or 5, 3 and 5 or 8, 4 and 1 or 6, 5 and 3 or 2, 6 and 4 or 7, 7 and 6 or 1 and 8 and 3 or 2. This would involve pairing cylinders on opposite sides of the engine and such pipes are generally referred to as "180 degree headers".

As the US muscle car scene and in particular HOT ROD Magazine has evolved with the widespread use of V8 engines after the war by all major manufacturers, the aftermarket performance scene has followed closely. As none of these engines had a single plane crankshaft and therefore two cylinder heads, each of which had exhaust pulses 180 degrees apart, an extractor exhaust was not applicable to these engines. Therefore, the term was never used to describe tubular steel exhaust manifolds.

In Australia, and possibly other countries, the term for a four cylinder tubular exhaust system was incorrectly applied to Holden six and V8 engines, and all US engines that made their way over the Pacific. Many still use it, but the term "header" is the correct nomenclature. Of course, there may be some who disagree with this, but that's the beauty of a democracy.

Regards from Down Under. :bowtieb:

aussiejohn
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the good info Dean and co. as for headers v extractors I could care less. Everyone in Australia knew what I was talking about so feel free to call em what ever you like lol
 

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Thanks for the good info Dean and co. as for headers v extractors I could care less. Everyone in Australia knew what I was talking about so feel free to call em what ever you like lol
Ditto here as well. I always called them extractors and then headers when playing with american cars.whatever the origin its still correct for Aussies.
To answer your question.
On my old RHD 56,I used pacemaker TRI Y's to suit the HK - HG Holden with Chev V8. They worked well and fitted the best for off the shelf. They didnt hit the ground (ever) and fitted perfect.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks

Ditto here as well. I always called them extractors and then headers when playing with american cars.whatever the origin its still correct for Aussies.
To answer your question.
On my old RHD 56,I used pacemaker TRI Y's to suit the HK - HG Holden with Chev V8. They worked well and fitted the best for off the shelf. They didnt hit the ground (ever) and fitted perfect.
Cheers for that mate. I will have to look around for some.
 

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Hi MRKS57, did you end up getting those Holden HK -HG extractors (headers)?
 

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Yep there called exractors in Australia. Im sure some ppl over here call them headers and I wouldn't think they would make them to suit in the US for rhd.
Actually I believe that extractors are tuned with all the pipes the same length as each other and joing at the collector and headers are similar but the pipes aren't the same length.

I could be wrong but that is what I have been told

Regards Phil
:a_a:
 

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Actually I believe that extractors are tuned with all the pipes the same length as each other and joing at the collector and headers are similar but the pipes aren't the same length.

I could be wrong but that is what I have been told

Regards Phil
:a_a:
Phil,

Yes, you are wrong, but it's hard to change some people's ideas when they have been wrong for so long that they believe that they're right.:)

Regards from Down Under. :bowtieb:

aussiejohn
 
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