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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys!
I've been welding in some panels on my 55 2DR SDN. I started with the toe boards since this is my first time welding in panels.
I've been reading a lot of threads on doing this work.
I know that patience is a big part of not grinding too far.
My question is what is the proper sander to use for the final dressing. I have a 5 inch high speed sander that workd ok if you have the room. I noticed that Robert (I've read alot of his posts) says he uses a 3 inch angle sander but I can't seem to find the right tool.
Also is there a good supplier for these sanding discs and cut off wheels?

Thanks
Steve
 

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I have a Znex ZX9411 air sander that I think is my favorite tool of everything I own. It comes with 3 quick-change Roloc disks. Get the good roloc disks in different grits and some metal finishing pads for it and you can make a weld disappear. You can also get bristle disks for it that are handy for stripping paint, removing old gaskets, etc. I used mine this evening to clean up the gasket surface on an oil pan. The coarse, purple 3" 3M sanding disks cut as good as a grinder. Watch the edges of those disks though. A few months ago I was using mine under my dash and it jumped off of what I was grinding and made it's way about 1/3 of the way through my finger. It is a well made tool and I would get another one if mine died. Here is a link to it:
http://erisautomotivetools.com/ZNXZX9411.aspx
 

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I use the same tools as acardon shows. I use the straight grinder or the angle grinder with a 1/16" thick cut off wheel, picking the one that has the best access/angles. Most if not all of the leveling of the weld is done with this setup.

You need to use a hammer and dolly to planish the weld and raise/lower any low/high spots as you level the weld. This is very important.

Once you have the weld bead ground down and the hammer/dolly work done, then you can use a 3" 36 grit roloc style sandpaper disc on a roloc backing pad to get the big scratches out. Then progress to 50 and 80 grit.

The biggest thing is that you need to take each deal individually, and don't just keep grinding/sanding until there's no metal thickness left. If you do that you'll be doing it over and it will be harder than the first time. But sometimes it works out that way until you learn.

I buy my cutoff wheels various places, but most of my roloc pads and discs come from McMaster-Carr. You can spend less, or more, but they have a full line of products and I get my orders in 3 days by UPS ground with no handling fees, just the real UPS shipping cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hey guys thanks for all of the info!
I'll pick up those tools and discs. I knew that there was something else/better than what I've been using but I couldn't seem to find anything.
My hope is by the time I'm finished with the floors and or areas that can't be seen I'll be doing good enough for the lower quarter panels.

I'll post some progress soon.

Steve
 
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