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Discussion Starter #1
1955 post sedan - Driver's side floor pan was rusted out and not touching the floor brace (the one near the toe board) when I got the car, and the floor brace has sprung upward. I would guess it sits about 1" above the frame that runs underneath at its greatest gap.

My hunch is that it needs to be pushed down about 3/4" but I have nothing to confirm that or other references. I'm hoping you can help (I did use the search before posting)

1. The car has 4 flat tires so it is supported on jack stands under the frame. Is this causing the floor brace to push further upward than it would if it was on the wheels? Will jacking the body upward a little help lower the floor brace?

2. I've seen a Hot Rod magazine article where they used a bottle jack under the steering column to push the patch panel and floor brace down into position. Any issues with using this method long enough to tack the floor pan in?

3. Is there an ideal "gap" between the floor brace and the frame that runs underneath so that I can get the floor pan tacked into a reasonable position? I'm assuming that the fully welded in floor pan (patch panel) will keep the floor brace in whatever position it was in before welding?

Thanks for any guidance or suggestions.
Steve
 

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The position you are talking about should have a body mount between the front floor brace and the frame.

The A pillar brace welds to the top of the floor pan, the floor brace is welded to the bottom of the floor pan.

When the body mount is tightened down it will hold this all in position on the frame.

Hope this helps!
Ernie

 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks PackRat, I appreciate the image and info. The issue I'm most concerned about is at the other end of the floor brace. The end furthest from the A pillar has moved upward (the A pillar area of the floor brace is in "factory" position I assume because it is held in place firmly by the bolt, washers, and mount)

Any suggestions on how much I should be pushing down on the portion of the brace closest to the trans tunnel? I couldn't take a measurement before I cut out the floor because "there was no floor" LOL

If there's no official specification, I'll just push it down until it looks about right. I was hoping for a measurement since it wouldn't take me more than a few seconds to do it "right" instead of just by eyeball measurement.
 

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Thanks Pack Rat, I can work with that. It"s about what I figured but I thought there might be points of reference to take measurements from. It's going in tomorrow morning so someone stop me before before 8am PST LOL
 

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Rather than pushing the floor pan down, and in turn the brace as well, I would pull the brace down enough to clear the floor pan. Get the floor pan welded in where it needs to be, then let the brace go up to meet the floor pan. You need to be able to move the floor pan around to get the right fit, and do the trimming, unobstructed by the brace.
 

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I once had a 56 floor pan that didn't fit up to the toe board, so you need the pan free of obstructions to make sure it fits right, and is trimmed right.

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Discussion Starter #8
Rather than pushing the floor pan down, and in turn the brace as well, I would pull the brace down enough to clear the floor pan. Get the floor pan welded in where it needs to be, then let the brace go up to meet the floor pan. You need to be able to move the floor pan around to get the right fit, and do the trimming, unobstructed by the brace.
Thanks for the suggestion. I had thought about that when looking down at the structure underneath but figured pushing it down might be easier...but I like your idea more.

Did you have a recommended technique for pulling the end of the floor brace down?
 

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You might be able to tie it off to the frame if it doesn't take too much pressure to get it down, otherwise you might get a cinder block, anvil, vice, or anything heavy enough to hold it down.
 
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