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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Recently picked up a '57 and would like to tinker with it and get it running. Motor turns over BUT when I first went to turn it over it went so far then stuck. Thanks to my boroscope I found the #7 cylinder had some light corrosion in it. I dumped some Kroil in the cylinders and worked it back and forth and now it will turn all the way over and I have used the starter to spin it over some but it does have a somewhat tight spot. Would you go ahead and oil the cylinders some and try to fire it up or should I pull the head and look closer at the cylinder. It is the original 283 2 barrel and was told it was running decent about 10 - 12 years ago. What Would You Do? I've got a feeling I already know the answer.
 

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I've got a feeling I already know the answer.
You know that the only safe way to take care of this is to pull the head and do a visual check on it. :(
Terry
 

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If it was me I'd spray marvel mystery oil in the cylinders and turn the engine over manually hopefull loosening up the tight spot. I have a 283 engine from a 67 impala that was sitting covered in my backyard for 24 years. I freed it up this way and it turns over easily. I put it in my shed for safe keeping.
 

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I have a 283 that had been sitting for 17 years in the car. I soaked it with Marvel Mystery Oil for a couple of days in the cylinders. I turned it over and it did ot seem to have any sticky spots. I did a compression check and found one cylinder lower than the rest. I supplied gas to the fuel pump from a can and stuck a water hose in the thermostat housing. I fired it up and it ran and has been running ever since.
 

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If you decide to start it as is, be sure to change the oil and filter and use an oil primer to pre lube before starting.
 

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One thing Ive found is when moisture gets in the cylinder it seep around the rings. After sitting for while a corrosion from the steel rings and the aluminum piston. Will stick the rings in the piston lands. Ive had to break the rings to get them out of the piston. Not saying the engine won't run but it will cause uneven wear to the cylinders.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The rings weren't stuck as it moved freely until it got to the one spot when #7 got just about to the top. I guess I'm going to go ahead and pull the head and see for sure whats going on in there.
 

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Wont hurt or cost anything to fire it up

If It where mine I would just soak it good and start it up. Fresh oil & filter. you can tell by the amount of blow by if the rings arent sealing. I always start a engine that has been sitting with a gas oil mixture. 1/2 pint of outboard motor oil to a gallon of gas. my favorite engine cylinder soak mixture is 3/4 diesel to 1/4 automatic transmission fluid. If I was gonna pull the heads I would buy a ring overhaul kit and put rings and inserts in it. Check the timing chain while your at it. Once you break the seal on a engine they sometimes start burning oil. Sometimes a engine that has been sitting will be great and sometimes it not so great. Randall
 

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The rings weren't stuck as it moved freely until it got to the one spot when #7 got just about to the top. I guess I'm going to go ahead and pull the head and see for sure whats going on in there.
Qwerty, Carman wasn't talking about the rings being stuck to the cylinder, he was talking about the rings being stuck to the piston. I tore a small motor down once and someone had hit the piston were the ring sits and it could not spin around the piston. It caused unever wear in the cylinder.
As for your motor, you have the right idea. The rings will wear themselves out trying to cut through alot of cylinder rust, then they leak.
Josh
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Qwerty, Carman wasn't talking about the rings being stuck to the cylinder, he was talking about the rings being stuck to the piston. I tore a small motor down once and someone had hit the piston were the ring sits and it could not spin around the piston. It caused unever wear in the cylinder.
As for your motor, you have the right idea. The rings will wear themselves out trying to cut through alot of cylinder rust, then they leak.
Josh
Yes he was, now that I go back and reread it. Why don't they have smiley for a dope slap? The heads is coming off. Might take a few days I have a living room that needs the drywall finished.
 

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I'm in the same boat, adding a full bath, tearing out my other bath room for a remodel, then it's on to a kitchen remodel. I hate mudding....lol.
Josh
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Heads are both off. I didn't see anything too discouraging. I ran a hone around the one cylinder a little bit, seems to be turning over better now. I'm going to go ahead and slap it back together and see what happens. Gonna have to move it inside as its getting chilly out in the backyard. Hopefully get it running and for a spin around the block before the white stuff shows up. Its kind of a fun project, more of a put it together with what you can scrounge. Reminds me of patching together my first '57 back in the late 1970's. Just so happens to be the same body style and color too :biggrin:
 

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I would at least give it a quick ring job.

Chances are pretty good you can get it running without taking it further down.

Chances are also pretty good it will burn oil and leak. You have it this far down so why take a chance on worn or broken rings? If you tear it down you can also inspect the crankshaft and replace the bearings, the cam and lifters, the timing chain, oil pump, and the rear main seal.
 
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