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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am nearing the end of the bodywork on my 57 4 door sedan and will be painting it soon. I have done extensive research on the internet to find the right method and have now decided that.

1. I should definitely use either white, grey or black primer.:confused:

2. I should definitely use from between an 80 grit to 600 grit for final sand prior
to applying basecoat.:confused:

3. I should definitely apply between 1 and 6 coats of basecoat.:confused:

4. I should definitely apply between 1 and 15 coats of clearcoat.:confused:

I guess my point is I am now more confused than when I started.:eek:

I am using a dark blue metallic acrylic enamel. Will it make a difference if my primer is light or dark? What grit will give me the best adhesion and smoothness? (I'm pretty sure smoothness is a word) How many coats of basecoat and do extra coats change the color like a stain would? How many coats of clearcoat is enough?

Thanks Kevin
 

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Not sure what brand paint your gonna use but if you use Dupont you can get a product thats called valueshade, every color has a valueshade number from 1 to 7, so 7 being the hardest to cover, you put 2 light coats of valueshade on till its covered or you cant see any undercoat, then put on your paint,3 mediam coats would probably do it, your really the one that has to determine that because your seeing what your painting if you feel as though you can still see through to the underneath stuff then you need more

As for clear I think 4 wet coats would be more then enough

final sand would be with at least 400/500 grit paper before paint,if you screw up with the paint and have to sand it you will also have to recoat at least 1 coat or more and you will have to take it easy on spray volume because you may get some lifting or other nasties

once you have your base on there is to be no sanding, you wait till the base flashes off and then apply your clear, wait till fairly dry to the touch then add an other, clear can then be sanded for buffing with 1000 to 3000 grit paper, I use 1500 with a DA
 

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Thanks for my education today Blackie!!!! I haven't painted in a few years, but I used to paint with the Dupont Centari. I always managed to get a pretty good looking paint job from it. I haven't been staying on top of the newer products so I enjoy any chance of getting re-educated.
Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks folks, I appreciate it. Seems like the more I read the more confused I got. Thanks for the info.

Kevin

Thanks Donzie, the forum is awesome
 

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Not sure what brand paint your gonna use but if you use Dupont you can get a product thats called valueshade, every color has a valueshade number from 1 to 7, so 7 being the hardest to cover, you put 2 light coats of valueshade on till its covered or you cant see any undercoat, then put on your paint,3 mediam coats would probably do it, your really the one that has to determine that because your seeing what your painting if you feel as though you can still see through to the underneath stuff then you need more

As for clear I think 4 wet coats would be more then enough

final sand would be with at least 400/500 grit paper before paint,if you screw up with the paint and have to sand it you will also have to recoat at least 1 coat or more and you will have to take it easy on spray volume because you may get some lifting or other nasties

once you have your base on there is to be no sanding, you wait till the base flashes off and then apply your clear, wait till fairly dry to the touch then add an other, clear can then be sanded for buffing with 1000 to 3000 grit paper, I use 1500 with a DA
sorry to say blackie but your a little off base. the valueshade chart is for sealers that go under paint. If you look at the mix code on dupont paints it will tell you the correct valueshade number to use. if you are painting a color like red, yellow or orange you use a light color like a #3. if you are painting black you use a #7. These were designed so you use less paint to get coverage. As far as final grits on sand paper can also depend on the color you are spraying. 320-400 is fine for solid colors you want a finer grit 400-600 for metttalics as the mettalic will lay different in a sand scratch and show up as a light or dark spot. two heavy coats of clear are sufficient 3 if you planning on really rubbing the car out to look like glass. just wanted to clear a few things up.
 

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I am nearing the end of the bodywork on my 57 4 door sedan and will be painting it soon. I have done extensive research on the internet to find the right method and have now decided that.

1. I should definitely use either white, grey or black primer.:confused:

2. I should definitely use from between an 80 grit to 600 grit for final sand prior
to applying basecoat.:confused:

3. I should definitely apply between 1 and 6 coats of basecoat.:confused:

4. I should definitely apply between 1 and 15 coats of clearcoat.:confused:

I guess my point is I am now more confused than when I started.:eek:

I am using a dark blue metallic acrylic enamel. Will it make a difference if my primer is light or dark? What grit will give me the best adhesion and smoothness? (I'm pretty sure smoothness is a word) How many coats of basecoat and do extra coats change the color like a stain would? How many coats of clearcoat is enough?

Thanks Kevin
if you are using acrylic enamel then you wont use clearcoat, unless you are planning on using as acrylic clear and going back over this. as far as the primer use what ever color you, want just get a dark grey sealer for good coverage. the sealer also seals off the primer and provides a uniform surface and a chemical bond for the paint to stick. most paints rely on chemical adhesion rather than mechanical adhesion IE sanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
if you are using acrylic enamel then you wont use clearcoat, unless you are planning on using as acrylic clear and going back over this. as far as the primer use what ever color you, want just get a dark grey sealer for good coverage. the sealer also seals off the primer and provides a uniform surface and a chemical bond for the paint to stick. most paints rely on chemical adhesion rather than mechanical adhesion IE sanding.
I am planning on using an acrylic clear, but what do you mean by going over it
 

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I am planning on using an acrylic clear, but what do you mean by going over it
some guys let the paint dry then come back and wet sand it. then spray one more coat of paint then they clear. you can just clear over the paint right after it tacks up. the main thing is follow the directions on the can. most of the time the problem lies in people not taking their time to mix correctly or follow flash time guidelines.Also a major factor is temperature. lots of guys use heaters to heat the shop up but if your metal temp on the car is not warm enough you can ruin a paint job. Im not sure were you are located at but here in kansas its 30-40 degrees right now. not good painting weather.

here are a few pics of my dads 32 roadster in starbirds. i painted this car when i was 21.




fyi this car has a glass body. and was all done in a 2 car garage except the interior, and I did the paint at my uncles body shop.
 

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at times getting my meaning into type just doesnt fly
Its ok man i wasnt trying to flame or be rude. just wanted to make sure other trifive members understood correctly. thats what these forums are here for helping each other out. Blackie it sounds like you have a few paint jobs under your belt.
 

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Hi Shanleal
Well I don't think you will get any better information than what you got here. :) the only thing I can add to that is : Dumb is an option in life, and wether we choose to use it or not is our option, Now dumb is often confused with scared or less confident or overwhelmed which can come apon you when you have to much information to take in on something your already not sure of. Take each step as a small one and we will be right behind you to get you to your next step. Each step will make the next one more clear and less intimidating. :)
 

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Delray nice paint work, I remember those days when I could do a sweet paint job like that, and yes your right I do have a lot of paint jobs under my belt, I'm 60 now and have lost a lot of my sight to where I have to wear glasses and for some reason I just dont see what I use to see with glasses on :(
 

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thanks for the compliments guys. i was an ase certified master tech in paint and body, and a gm certified master tech for 7 years . 2 years ago i started school for information technology, quit my autobody job about 6 months ago and never looked back.:D ill see if i can find any motor pics most of the ones we have are on 35 mm film. these just happen to be pics taken from starbirds.
 

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depends on the painter

No two painters will set up their guns exactly the same or shoot at the same speed or distance to the car. To determine how many coats of paint you'll need try what is called a "spray-out" card. You can pick them up at your paint supply store or make your own by simply making a black and white checkerboard pattern on an index card. Tape this card to a piece of masking paper on the wall or whatever you use to check your spray gun adjustments and after you have adjusted your gun for spray pattern and material flow count how many coats it takes to make the checkerboard disappear. If all else fail check the directions on the paint can. Good luck and have fun!
 
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