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I am replacing a standard heating system with a deluxe heating system in my 56 BelAir hardtop. I need to remove a plate covering the hole that will feed fresh air to my blower motor, and then install the phlange. Two questions ---

1) The screw holding the plate in place do not appear to be standard or Phillips. Do I need to buy a screw extractor kit? I assume thr rubber band trick won't work because of this not being a standard or Phillips head screw, and I can't get a good angle to cut a standard slot into the head using my Dremel.

2) I am unsure which direction to mount the flange to the car. The pictures and instructions in the 56 Accessories installation manual are unclear. I have attached a picture. Two sides of the phlange have sides shaped like a trapeziod, one tall side and one short side. In my picture, the trapezoids are at the top and botton, the high side is on the left, and the low side is on the right. I assume the four sides face the interior of the car, correct? If so, does the low side face the top, bottom, front, or back of the car?

Thanks in advance for your response.

Dennis




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Pretty sure the thin edge of the flange faces the firewall, thicker edge faces the seat. Those screws are probably "clutch head" screws. They make special drivers for them.


They are used in a few places like holding the vent cables, E-Brake shaft bracket and fuel tank sender. If you aren't going to reuse them, most times you can get a flat screwdriver to fit in the hole enough to get them loose. I ground one a little to get it to fit.
 

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The only way you can mate up the heater blower motor and the flange with the rubber seal in between is if you put the flange on it first then install it as a unit. I think this is how GM did it - everything is one piece which makes it trickier and almost takes two or three people.
 

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The only way you can mate up the heater blower motor and the flange with the rubber seal in between is if you put the flange on it first then install it as a unit. I think this is how GM did it - everything is one piece which makes it trickier and almost takes two or three people.
The defroster duct work goes in first. Then the main heater housing goes in, with the foam seal located for the housing to defroster duct. Bolt all that to the firewall loosely. Take the rubber seals and install one on the heater housing and one on the blower housing (right side) Roll the rubber bands back over themselves. Slide the motor housing into place and loosely bolt it to the firewall. Now with some patience and a screwdriver, upholstery tool...whatever, work those two seals back over the blower housing and cowl vent flange. If you left everything loose, you can get up there and work the seal all the way around.

Look at the 56 accessory manual page #45 and #46 for details. https://www.trifive.com/d1/forums/manual/1956AccessoriesInstallation.pdf
 

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The defroster duct work goes in first. Then the main heater housing goes in, with the foam seal located for the housing to defroster duct. Bolt all that to the firewall loosely. Take the rubber seals and install one on the heater housing and one on the blower housing (right side) Roll the rubber bands back over themselves. Slide the motor housing into place and loosely bolt it to the firewall. Now with some patience and a screwdriver, upholstery tool...whatever, work those two seals back over the blower housing and cowl vent flange. If you left everything loose, you can get up there and work the seal all the way around.

Look at the 56 accessory manual page #45 and #46 for details. https://www.trifive.com/d1/forums/manual/1956AccessoriesInstallation.pdf
I agree with what yo are saying, as I have been using the 56 accessory manual, pages 45-49. One this is unclear to me --- it appears to me that the blower housing to core housing "pipes" don't slide into each other - they simply have the rubber band rolled over each end to form the seal. Same thing with the blower housing and the fan. Is that correct? And do you agree that the short edge of the flange faces the firewall, taller edge faces the seat, and the two tapered side are top and bottom on the interior side of the wall thephlange attached to? Thanks for your advice!.
 

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Pretty sure the thin edge of the flange faces the firewall, thicker edge faces the seat. Those screws are probably "clutch head" screws. They make special drivers for them.


They are used in a few places like holding the vent cables, E-Brake shaft bracket and fuel tank sender. If you aren't going to reuse them, most times you can get a flat screwdriver to fit in the hole enough to get them loose. I ground one a little to get it to fit.
Thanks for educating me on the clutch screw. I thought a prior owner had messed up the vent cable bracket screws, and I had to work like heck to get them off with a vice grip. When you talk about the flange being the direction you mention, I assume that is on the car interior side of the metal it is screwed into, correct?
 

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I agree with what yo are saying, as I have been using the 56 accessory manual, pages 45-49. One this is unclear to me --- it appears to me that the blower housing to core housing "pipes" don't slide into each other - they simply have the rubber band rolled over each end to form the seal. Same thing with the blower housing and the fan. Is that correct? And do you agree that the short edge of the flange faces the firewall, taller edge faces the seat, and the two tapered side are top and bottom on the interior side of the wall thephlange attached to? Thanks for your advice!.
Everything you said is right. The housings all fit within an 1/8 of an inch of each other, then the rubber gets rolled back over so it covers the gap. That way the whole thing can go together a piece at a time. Otherwise you would be struggling with one big heavy unit. This way, a core goes bad, remove the heater section. A fan motor goes bad, remove just the blower housing. Chevrolet had some pretty good engineers back in the day. I am sure it was all about cost and ease on the assembly line.
 

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Thanks for educating me on the clutch screw. I thought a prior owner had messed up the vent cable bracket screws, and I had to work like heck to get them off with a vice grip. When you talk about the flange being the direction you mention, I assume that is on the car interior side of the metal it is screwed into, correct?
Yes. If it had a standard heater, or no heater at all, there was a flat plate installed with those four screws that blocked off the fresh air path from the cowl vent. Once the deluxe heater was installed the flange was needed for the fresh air connection.
 
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