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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello. I just installed a power front disc brake kit with dual master cylinder to replace the old drum / single master cylinder. Everything works fine, but, not happy with the brake pedal height... going almost to the floor before starting to work. Bled twice to make sure air is out. Brake rod adjusted out as far as possible. I got the kit from Eckler's Chevy. Any suggestions...??? Help.:bowtier:
 

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pedal heighth

Was there anything in the instructions about drilling another hole about 1" above the existing hole and attach rod there? Iknow they had an update awhile back to do that in one of their tech articles. It changes the arm length and makes a big difference. ran into the same problem, found the tech article and it worked.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
Good suggestion. But, yes, I did drill a hole in the brake pedal swingarm 1" lower than the original clevis pin hole. (I'll double check that I went lower) I'm looking at the instructions. They say drill the hole 1" Lower than the original clevis pin hole.
 

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Hello. I just installed a power front disc brake kit with dual master cylinder to replace the old drum / single master cylinder. Everything works fine, but, not happy with the brake pedal height... going almost to the floor before starting to work. Bled twice to make sure air is out. Brake rod adjusted out as far as possible. I got the kit from Eckler's Chevy. Any suggestions...??? Help.:bowtier:
Yes, you do drill the hole 1" lower than the existing hole.
Did you bench bleed the master cylinder? Chances are, it still has air in the system. Calipers installed with bleader on top side?
Brake rod may be adjusted too far out. It should be adjusted so there is just very little play before the pedal rod hits the resistance of the booster spring. If the rod is too long, the M/C won't get a new supply of fluid, while bleeding, because the port is blocked.
 

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Couple things.... first, Imperative that you bench bleed the master, second, you must bleed the whole system.... my guess is you have done that but as it is a front upgrade, dont forget the rear as well. What Rick said.

I have just hooked up my system too, 4 wheel disks, with a buddy we worked around the car 4 times bleeding.... then also took a mallet to the calipers to shake a little more air out of them.... yes, it does work.

I now have a hard pedel 2/3 of the way down. The instructions I got from Hydrotech brake Components said that this was normal. Or at least what could be expected. They said, once you are sure the system is 99% good, take it to the street and work in your new components, get everything up at operating temps. Once you put a few miles on it, bleed it one more time.

They also advised that the breaking in of a new set of calipers and pads could take 100 miles and a good breakin up too 500 miles (like a new car is recommended before you bring it back to the dealer).

Seems to mee that it shouldn't take that many miles but I am now about to hit the road for the first test, and them bleed again. Hydrotech was fairly confident that the breakin would increase the pedal height also. Hope this helps.

Gil
 

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Yes, you do drill the hole 1" lower than the existing hole.
Did you bench bleed the master cylinder? Chances are, it still has air in the system. Calipers installed with bleader on top side?
Brake rod may be adjusted too far out. It should be adjusted so there is just very little play before the pedal rod hits the resistance of the booster spring. If the rod is too long, the M/C won't get a new supply of fluid, while bleeding, because the port is blocked.
Make sure you bench bleed that master cylinder. Use the hose kit they should have provided you with. And as funny as it may sound, yes, make sure the calipers are installed with the bleeder valve on the top side. :sign0020:. Then make sure you bleed the entire system. Once you get some braking out of your car carefully drive it around. The vibrations will cause the air to travel up the lines and to the reservoir. Make sure to top off the brake fluid again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes, you do drill the hole 1" lower than the existing hole.
Did you bench bleed the master cylinder? Chances are, it still has air in the system. Calipers installed with bleader on top side?
Brake rod may be adjusted too far out. It should be adjusted so there is just very little play before the pedal rod hits the resistance of the booster spring. If the rod is too long, the M/C won't get a new supply of fluid, while bleeding, because the port is blocked.
Thankyou for the information. Will try to get it working this weekend.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Make sure you bench bleed that master cylinder. Use the hose kit they should have provided you with. And as funny as it may sound, yes, make sure the calipers are installed with the bleeder valve on the top side. :sign0020:. Then make sure you bleed the entire system. Once you get some braking out of your car carefully drive it around. The vibrations will cause the air to travel up the lines and to the reservoir. Make sure to top off the brake fluid again.
Thanks... will double check the system this weekend. Thanks again.
 
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