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Guys my beater truck is a 2003 Mercury Mountaineer. I keep it around for picking up stuff and lending out as a spare car to my grown kids when one of their vehicles goes down. As you guessed it doesn't get much use. Last summer my son in law used it while his Jeep was in the shop. He told me he added a couple of cans of freon but it leaked out in a few days. It got used a few times this past winter when there was snow on the ground and the a/c wasn't used. The other day I used it to pick up some plants for the yard and the a/c is not blowing cold. Anyone got a sure fire way to locate the leak that won't cost a ton of money on special tool purchases?

Thanks

Don
 

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There are a/c dyes you add it to the sytem and the colored dye will show where the leak is. :anim_25:
 

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Buy a small bottle of refrigerant wih dye -tell in it. Go to a HVAC supplier, or maybe Grainger. It's common stuff.
Mix up some dish soap and water and soap every joint, even the smallest leak will blow big bubbles.
 

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I never had much luck locating an A/C leak with the dye.. "usually" a leak is spotted by an oily gray residue that looks like real fine sand at the point of leak...??
If A/C has not been messed with recently,,look for the obvious, like at the compressor clutch area and the major fittings.
Do like RayHarris says, use a spray bottle with a strong soap/ water mix :anim_25::flag6:
 

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Yep, the colored dyes work quite well.....:anim_25:
:gba:
bowtie-trifive
I believe you have to wear amber colored glasses to detect the dye.
 

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good luck, I have an electronic detector that hasn't been used in 15 years. when refrigerant leaks, it mixes with the surrounding air and an electronic detector senses the refrigerant even when it isn't at the leak point. I always revert to soap bubbles. They sell soap leak detector that you can brush on. I've seen times you soaped it up an didn't see anything leaking right away and went back in an hour or two and there would be a bubble.
On existing, somewhat older systems, it is almost always a leak where the shaft goes into the pump, which requires a new seal.
good luck.
 
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