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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Finally, I've reached the point of hanging and fitting sheet metal before body work and painting on my '56 TDHT. For the past 5 years or so, the hood has been resting vertically on its "ears", leaning against a garage wall. When I installed it on the hinges and closed it, the center sits even with the cowl vent line, but the ears "droop" evenly on both sides about 1/4 inch below the cowl line.

It is possible that this hood came from a different car, but it's my understanding that they are interchangeable, at least on all '56's. I know metal sags and deforms over time with pressure and temperature changes. In looking at other '56's at shows, they're all over the place w.r.t. hood alignment. Some are perfect, some are bowed worse than mine.

Do I try to fix it, or just paint it and live with it? My only idea at this point is to lay it horizontally and put some weight (30lbs?) in the center back edge and let it sit for awhile. Or maybe it's misaligned hinges bowing it as it closes?

Any advice much appreciated.

Thanks,

David
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
addendum

I just posted the original, but now realize it would be better placed in the "Sheet Metal & Fabrication" forum. Can't figure out how to switch it. Can someone help?

Thanks.

David
 

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What I did, was to put a 4 ton porto power between the two hinges and push.

Watch the center of the hood for buckles and stop before you "set" them.
It's a two man job!

A rubber mallet, if gently used might help.

If you go too far, don't call me, just sit down and cry!
:shakehands: :p3:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks, but still unsure...

Thanks to whoever moved this posting to its present location.

To irishsteve: Thanks. Not an unreasonable idea, but the rubber stop posts on either side of the cowl are already screwed out to almost their full height, and it lifts the center, too.

Roger: Thanks also. I'm only going to use pushing and hammering as a last resort, and because of my limited experience working sheet metal, I am pretty sure I'd be crying within minutes after the first attack, unless, as you suggest, I keep someone with me who has better experience with this stuff.

So I'm hoping some sheet metal expert (sorry, you two, if you are such) can tell me if my problem was created by standing the hood on its ears to begin with. That would suggest the least destructive correction to this warp.

David
 

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You do realize that Fisher Body and the assembly plants used 2x4's, levers and large hammers to tweak panel fitting. If it don't fit, bend it until it does.
 

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I'm having difficulty understanding exactly how your hood is deformed.

But I think it's safe to say you could store it vertically with the rear corners on the floor. Or even with the 4 corners on the floor. There is a big brace at the rear of the hood that's going to maintain its shape. Or maintain the shape of previous damage.

If the hood is bowed side to side relative to the cowl shape, it can be fixed. Pretty much as already suggested. Support it at the sides and push in the middle. And with the caution suggested also.

If the peak is bowed front to back on a 55-56 hood, that can be fixed too.
 
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