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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone have a suggestion for a decent, relatively high build primer in a spray can that I can use on my air cleaner? I found a 57 Power Pack air cleaner top on E-bay a month ago that I am converting to dry element. Although it is hard to see in the first photo because of poor color contrast, the rear of the air cleaner was crushed in at one point, and someone hammered it out from the inside, to the approximate right shape. I made a couple of different radius nylon "punches" to help work out some of the lows from the inside, and pick hammered, slap filed and metal finished the rest to get it where a quick brush with a disc sander shows that everything is level. I would prefer not to mix up several small batches of high build primer to shoot through the gun, as my area that needs build is pretty small. I realize that a spray can primer will not build like a good epoxy, but my surface is pretty good and shouldn't need much fill, beyond two sandings. I also want to be sure that the primer is OK with underhood heat, although I suspect that any automotive primer is OK at 200 degrees. Any decent spray can primers out there that will work for my surface fill? Thanks!

Driver.
 

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My local paint supply shop sells SEM brand rattle cans but I haven't used many... I think it's actually a 1K primer since there's no mixing... otherwise I've always liked the Duplicolor cans at NAPA. I believe they come in high build...
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Duplicolor primer

Duplicolor is what I use when using rattle cans.....:anim_25:

bowtie-trifive
On Mickey's suggestion I stopped at Autozone last night and bought two cans of this:

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/ac...ller-primer/_/N-259g?itemIdentifier=59837_0_0_

I shot three coats on the metal finished spots between last night and this morning, and will try to wet sand down tonight. If the product is "gummy" or won't wet sand down properly, I will bead blast it back off, chalk it up to bad experience and take the extra time to mix up a small batch of epoxy primer.

Driver.
 

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Nose to long?

Does anyone have a suggestion for a decent, relatively high build primer in a spray can that I can use on my air cleaner? I found a 57 Power Pack air cleaner top on E-bay a month ago that I am converting to dry element. Although it is hard to see in the first photo because of poor color contrast, the rear of the air cleaner was crushed in at one point, and someone hammered it out from the inside, to the approximate right shape. I made a couple of different radius nylon "punches" to help work out some of the lows from the inside, and pick hammered, slap filed and metal finished the rest to get it where a quick brush with a disc sander shows that everything is level. I would prefer not to mix up several small batches of high build primer to shoot through the gun, as my area that needs build is pretty small. I realize that a spray can primer will not build like a good epoxy, but my surface is pretty good and shouldn't need much fill, beyond two sandings. I also want to be sure that the primer is OK with underhood heat, although I suspect that any automotive primer is OK at 200 degrees. Any decent spray can primers out there that will work for my surface fill? Thanks!

Driver.
Hello, let me ask a "stupid" question. Now I am a modified guy, and have not been around a stock 1957 Power Pack air cleaner for a long time. BUT
It looks like the nose/inlet is too long on the air cleaner in your pictures, hope I am wrong, but if I am right it is a 58 air cleaner. It will fit the carb OK but you will have to be angled to the side, instead of straight ahead.
Again, hope I am wrong, but it is something you might want to check.
Mike
 
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