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Have you tested them with a straight connection to the battery, thereby eliminating the realy and switch?
 

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You have to be very carefull doing this.

Soak the adjusting screw to the horn with some type of lubricant. Generally the horns are one of the most overlooked parts on these cars and rarely get attention. So the adjusting screws tend to be frozen in place.

Back the screw out a little at a time. You may need to re-soak the screw, screw it back in the horn and then try removing it again. This step itself could take a few minutes since you may need to re-soak and screw the screw back in several times to finally get the scrw out. Without it breaking off.

Once the screw is out. Spray some lubricant in the hole. Just a shot or two should be okay.

Now, re-install the adjusting screw. Hook the horn to a 12 volt source and adjust the horn for sound. (your neighbors love this)

But I've got completely dead horns to work again doing this.
 

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Horns

You have to be very carefull doing this.

Soak the adjusting screw to the horn with some type of lubricant. Generally the horns are one of the most overlooked parts on these cars and rarely get attention. So the adjusting screws tend to be frozen in place.

Back the screw out a little at a time. You may need to re-soak the screw, screw it back in the horn and then try removing it again. This step itself could take a few minutes since you may need to re-soak and screw the screw back in several times to finally get the scrw out. Without it breaking off.

Once the screw is out. Spray some lubricant in the hole. Just a shot or two should be okay.

Now, re-install the adjusting screw. Hook the horn to a 12 volt source and adjust the horn for sound. (your neighbors love this)

But I've got completely dead horns to work again doing this.


What about horns that make noise but sound really bad. I have about 3 sets and they all have been setting for years, all but one make noise but sound awful. Any fix or adjustment on something like this?
 

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Check the 57 Shop Manual in the Electrical section for horn servicing.
 

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horns

i have taken them apart before grind the heads off the rivets nock them out with a center punch pull it apart and clean all the rust out, because that is the problem most of the time. if the tin disc that is sandwiched between has holes are is rotted away then it is no good.make sure all contact or clean put the two half back together insert rivets and peen the rivets over and paint. new working horn. this does not work all the time. i would say one out of three horns will work.do to the amount of rust most of the time. if any one needs i do have original non rebuilt 325 and 326 1957 horns for 150.00 a pair. some guys have these horns saying rebuilt and sell them for over 200.00 dollars on e bay would like to know were they get the new parts to rebuild them as i have several that need new parts. anyone know were???????
 

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............ they get the new parts to rebuild them as i have several that need new parts. anyone know were???????
I'd like to know the answer also.
 

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In the Corvette hobby, there are several who restore original numbered and dated horns.

3 names come to mind.

Dennis Portka in New York

The Horn Works in ????

Ron Goralski and Chuck Walker in Maryland.

I'll warn you that it's VERY pricy, $100 to maybe as high as $200 per horn, fully restored.

The tin diaphragms are reproduced. There are 2 different thicknesses made for HI and LOW horns. I believe you can buy the diaphragms by themselves, but taking them apart, re-riveting them with the proper rivets, etc is an art, like tuning a snare drum.

Chuck
 

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hay chuck were do you buy the tins i never seen them for sale.
I'm not home now. I'm up in Baltimore, so I have no access to my info.

If you check some of the Corvette suppliers, Paragon, Corvette Central come to mind, they might have them, BUT..

Let me forewarn you....it ain't easy.

Guys that restore these horns have the special rivets with the hatches on them. The compression of each rivet "stretches" the diaphragm, much like tuning a snare drum.

It's not a matter of just drilling out the rivets, putting a diaphragm in, and bolting it back together. :D

If the magnet and the other little electrical gizmos inside are toast, they need to be replaced too.

I'll see if I can find the diaphragm suppliers by Googling it. :D

IF originality, i.e. numbers and dates are of no importance to you, you're MUCH better off going to Pep Boys and buying a horn.

Chuck
 

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And another.

http://www.ncrs.org/masondixon/pictures/horns.html

This is a link to my buddy Ron Goralski up in Maryland. Ron's retired, and he and another friend, Chuck Walker, were in the horn resto biz for awhile. They still do a few.

BTW, they also restored 53-62 horns, so the parts for those are available too. I believe Ron actually reproduced some of the correct thickness HI and LO diaphragms.

Worth a few calls.

Chuck
 

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IF originality, i.e. numbers and dates are of no importance to you, you're MUCH better off going to Pep Boys and buying a horn.
I always thought if need be, I'd go to the salvage yard buy a set of working horns (loud ones) and attach them under the gravel shield. Keep the original horns in place (so they look like they still work) and use the salvage yard units when I needed to remind someone they need to drive more responsibly.
 
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