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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to replace my original '66 283's dampener, as I suspect the inertia ring has slipped. I plan to change the cam next spring, and I'd like to replace the dampener while I'm at it.
Should I stay with the stock diameter, is bigger any better? I know there were several different ones installed on small blocks over the years. This engine is beat on regularly, but probably won't see 7,000 rpm. Maybe.;) Do the aftermarket units (Rattler, Fluidampr, etc.) have any real advantages over a stock replacement for a mild application like mine? SFI rating is not important here. I'm also planning to drop the crank to have the snout drilled and tapped. Hard to degree when theres no hole to attach a degree wheel to!
What say you?

Tim
 

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1956 chevy 210 del rey sedan
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I would drill and tap the crank in the engine. really no need to remove it. as far as balancers goes I prefer the 8" gm one for the street motors I build .
 

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balancer

an aftermarket balancer is the way to go they are a safe and a inexpencive piece you can get a balancer from kmj performance for under a hundred dollars they are sfi appoved and will take rpm up to 8000 i never use stock any more as for one thing stock replacements are allmost as much money and there not sfi appoved as for size i use this method small inch small small balancer big in big balancer i have both in my motors and never have a problem i allso like that aftermarket balancers come with timing marks ingraved in the balancer along with 90 degree marks
hope this helps you
thanks bowtieblue57 bowtie-trifive
 

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I think if I was in the market for a 283 balancer, I'd buy one of the stock style SFI approved ones.

The Fluidamper, ATI, and similar ones are nice but unnecessary for your engine.

Do you have stock front engine mounts? If so, you'll have to notch them for an 8" balancer to fit. I don't think a big balancer is really needed for a 283 either, but you can use one if you want.

Whatever balancer you get, be sure to get a timing pointer/tab that matches the balancer.

I would also buy a degreed balancer or at a minimum, put a Mr. Gasket timing tape on it.

What makes you think the outer ring has slipped? They probably don't do that as often as many think. Incorrect TDC timing is usually the wrong pointer/tab.

As far as drilling and tapping the crankshaft, I don't think it's essential for a stock or near stock engine, but it becomes more important as rpms increase.

If you do drill and tap the crank, get one of those crank bolts with a big head on it, like Moroso or B&B performance sell. That way you'll have less risk of the socket falling off the bolt head, especially if you use the bolt to turn the engine over while setting valves, etc.

I can't imagine drilling and tapping it in the car. In fact, I can't imagine dropping the crank and leaving the block in the car. Just pull the engine.
 

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timing pointer

REMEMBER TO LOOK AT THE BALANCER YOU INSTALL CLOSELY. IF THE TDC MARK LINES UP WITH THE SLOT FOR THE KEYWAY YOU USE THE TIMING COVER WITH THE TAB WELDED ON 68 AND EARLIER) IF THE TDC MARK IS OFFSET FROM THE KEYWAY YOU USE THE BOLT ON MARKER(69 AND LATER BALANCER) YOU CAN USE AN EARLIER COVER ON A LATER BALANCER BUT YOU HAVE TO GRiND OFF THE ENTIRE TAB, NOT JUST BREAK OFF THE TAB.(CLEARANCE ISSUE). BACK IN THE DAY IT COST CAR OWNER 3 RACING ENGINE IN 3 WEEKS, 10 DEGREES TOO MUCH TIMING WILL TAKE OUT #2 ROD BEARINGS IN 3 LAPS ON A 3/8 TRACK WHEN YOU ARE RUNNING AT 7,000 R'S. :sign0020:
 

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"but probably won't see 7,000 rpm. Maybe."

Key word, here>>>>"maybe". Turn a stocker that high and be prepared to blow the outer ring off..Damage could range from none, to the entire ft end of the car being blasted...
Ask me how I know this...
 

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"Ask me how I know this..."

I was in the pits at the US Nationals in Indy in the mid 80s....about 200' to the side of the starting line. A Pro Stock car blew the balancer on the starting line, it blew the whole front end off the car, destroyed both front tires, and a chunk of the balancer landed about 50' further off the line from where I was. It probably went 200' in the air too. Fortunately noone was hurt. By the beginning of the next season everyone had to have an SFI approved balancer.

A couple of years before that, I was at a race where a guy had the starter ring explode on an econo dragster at about 170 mph. It almost cut the car in half - partially went through all 4 frame rails in the area. That incident was what caused the mandate for SFI flexplates and bellhousing shields.

I know a lot of guys whined about these and other safety mandates, but they all have a good reason.
 

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SFI is a joke otherwise the Professional Products would never pass. I had a new 150 dollar one that came with a rotating assembly come apart. ATI on there now no problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
As always, thanks for the input guys!
I didn't know that there were two different timing tab locations, depending upon the year. I know about the later engines that have the marks vertical behind the water pump, but thats not the case. I'll bet that's why I can't get my timing right. My timing cover had its original tab broken off before I owned the car as the remnants are still on the cover, for now. There is an aftermarket chrome one in place right now. I gave up on trying to set/check timing with my timing light and just set it by seat of the pants and idle quality. It starts at the tap of the key, but if you put a light on it, it shows being advanced quite a bit above the timing tab. This is why I suspected the inertia ring had slipped. It has an old Accel mechanical advance distributor so vacuum advance is out of the equation. I'll probably change this too in pursuit of better fuel economy out on the road.
Another reason I want to change the balancer is because when I installed it with my trusty dead blow and block of wood it slipped on a little easier than I'd like. And not having a bolt securing it on kinda concerns me. Fortunately, it hasn't moved.
Again, thanks for the advice and recommendations, they are greatly appreciated!

Tim
 

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balancer

210 ratrod you should never put a balancer on with a hammer and wood as that will drive the thrust bearing out and then you will be left with the crank walking back and forth and that is hard on bearings you should invest in an balancer installer or borrow one they are not that much money and you will save the bearings
thanks bowtieblue57bowtie-trifive
 

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"210 ratrod you should never put a balancer on with a hammer and wood as that will drive the thrust bearing out"

That is an internet myth. Check any pre 69 shop manual and it will tell you to hammer it on.

You can't use one of those commercial balancer installers if the crank isn't drilled and tapped, and there was never a factory 265 or 283 that had that.
 

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210 ratrod you should never put a balancer on with a hammer and wood as that will drive the thrust bearing out and then you will be left with the crank walking back and forth and that is hard on bearings you should invest in an balancer installer or borrow one they are not that much money and you will save the bearings
thanks bowtieblue57bowtie-trifive
No way to do that on an undrilled crank....See Shop Manual:

 

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210 ratrod you should never put a balancer on with a hammer and wood as that will drive the thrust bearing out and then you will be left with the crank walking back and forth and that is hard on bearings you should invest in an balancer installer or borrow one they are not that much money and you will save the bearings
thanks bowtieblue57bowtie-trifive
The 57 shop manual says to install the balancer with a hammer and a steel tool. I installed mine with a baby sledge and a block of wood. No shimmy in the crank at all. Jim
 

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Timing tab location

Also in the past, I have determined piston top dead center locaton and welded a pointer made from wire. The wire was thick enough where I could bend it as necessary. The end of the wire was ground to a point. I then also had the stick on timing tape mounted on the balancer. I did all this not only because I wanted to be sure the 0 point was correct, but with all the china balancers and tin timing covers, I wasn't sure they could get it right :sign0020:
 
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