Chevy Tri Five Forum banner

1 - 20 of 23 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Yep, I am still a live.

Here is a couple of quiz questions

Thought a little quiz would help. If you have questions post them here so we can keep the quiz going if you guys want.

MY background is the US Military.




1. On the main flag pole of a military post their is a copper ball on top of the flag pole. So the question is what is that ball called and what is in it, and second what is buried under the flag pole.





2. What is the single word that soldiers are barred from using while on the ( radio ) talking to other soldiers.




3. What are 4 places that the American Flag flays 24 hours a day and is never taken down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,271 Posts
I’ll take a shot. I do remember the old flag pole story which if my memory serves me correct, was just a myth. The story goes that the finial ball on top, which I believe is more commonly made of brass, contains a razor blade, matches and a bullet. The last man a live was to use the razor to cut the flag away, use the matches to burn the flag and the bullet was to be put into the gun buried at the base of the pole to kill himself. I am not familiar with the word not spoken over the radio. I look forward to this answer. As far as the flag flying 4 hours a day. This can only be done under congressional authorization or by presidential proclamation. I believe today, there are now well over four locations. Few years back, all US Ports of Entry where authorized. We have a number of sites in the DC area. The White House, the 50 flags that encircle the base of the Washington monument, the US Marine Corp memorial, Fort McHenry and the Star Spangle Banner house in Baltimore. I have also been to the Betty Ross house and Valley Forge that both claim they have authorization as well. It does remind of the old joke about the US flags that will never fly at half mast. The ones on the moon, on US currency and I don’t remember the other two.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The brass ball is called a ( Truck )

It contains 1 45 cal bullet

at the base of the flag pole is a 45 cal

It is so that the base cannot be surrendered until 1 last shot is fired

the 4 places flag flies night and day

1. over the white house

2. on the moon

3. The battleship Arizonia

4. Tomb of the unknown
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66,712 Posts
good stuff. God Bless America!
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Still one to get answered

What is the single word that soldiers are barred from using while on the ( radio ) talking to other soldiers.
 

·
Registered
Denver, Colo
Joined
·
625 Posts
Still, one to get answered
I won't answer this one because I looked it up on the Internet.

Here are a few more I'll ask. Try to guess. (No Fair looking them up).
This is military speak for common items. Decades ago I heard the military spent:

3 million dollars on calcium-trace display units. What did they buy?
2 million dollars on hydro-blast force cups. What did they buy?

A military helicopter went down and crashed in the 1980s. The official finding was that:
A hexagonal rotating compression unit underwent catastrophic stress-related shaft detachment.
What happened?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,206 Posts
I won't answer this one because I looked it up on the Internet.

Here are a few more I'll ask. Try to guess. (No Fair looking them up).
This is military speak for common items. Decades ago I heard the military spent:

3 million dollars on calcium-trace display units. What did they buy?
2 million dollars on hydro-blast force cups. What did they buy?

A military helicopter went down and crashed in the 1980s. The official finding was that:
A hexagonal rotating compression unit underwent catastrophic stress-related shaft detachment.
What happened?
I was never in the military, but I guess Rolaids and water cup of some kind and rotor blade broke loose. IDK
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
64,821 Posts
Great to hear your still alive Otis (y), at a guess soldiers would be banned from addressing others soldiers by gender
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
Still one to get answered

What is the single word that soldiers are barred from using while on the ( radio ) talking to other soldiers.
Still one to get answered

What is the single word that soldiers are barred from using while on the ( radio ) talking to other soldiers.
On radio transmissions, never say REPEAT -- Always "Say again your last!" REPEAT = Fire again on the last coordinates!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
I won't answer this one because I looked it up on the Internet.

Here are a few more I'll ask. Try to guess. (No Fair looking them up).
This is military speak for common items. Decades ago I heard the military spent:

3 million dollars on calcium-trace display units. What did they buy?
2 million dollars on hydro-blast force cups. What did they buy? Toilet Seats?

A military helicopter went down and crashed in the 1980s. The official finding was that:
A hexagonal rotating compression unit underwent catastrophic stress-related shaft detachment.
What happened? The rotor blades separated from the rotor shaft.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
816 Posts
Angry Nine is an old HF radio.

Prick 6 or 7 I generally heard used as a coded derogatory term for squad leaders or platoon sergeants (ranks E6 or E7)...coded because the term sounds a bit like radio nomenclature. “The Prick 7 is acting up” would actually mean that the $!&@ platoon sergeant is in a bad mood.

INT QRK is Morse pro sign for “how is my signal strength?” (I was a Morse Op at one time). If there is a dual meaning, I don’t know.

M1 thumb was what could happen if the bolt slammed forward and caught your thumb. Not old enough to have messed with the M1, but M60 thumb almost got me medically released from Ranger school (the RI was NOT happy to find out I’d been hiding it).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
816 Posts
Hmm. After pushing send, I think QSA is “signal strength” and QSK is “readability”. Been a minute since I’ve done Morse.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Bilaire got it correct

On radio transmissions, never say REPEAT -- Always "Say again your last!" REPEAT = Fire again on the last coordinates!


New question

1 squad is traveling thru the valley , while the other squad is going along the ridgeline, what is this called


2. Soldier is in the prone pisition and is told to fire 12 inches above ground level what is this called.
 

·
Administrator
1957 Bel Air sport sedan
Joined
·
8,750 Posts
I've had M1 thumb from my own rifle... ouch.

I miss the Pig, I carried one of those for a few miles.

As a former 11M and 13E, the word "repeat" is a word rarely uttered.

I still say over Zoom or anywhere else if someone askes me how well I hear them, "I read you 5 by 5" (in more formal settings and NASA still uses it), or I say "I got you Lickin Chicken" (loud and clear)
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,084 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
THe answer to my 2 questions

1. It's called bounding overwatch, the high ground troops protect the low ground troops.

2. The answer is called grazing Fire
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,352 Posts
Angry Nine is an old HF radio.

Prick 6 or 7 I generally heard used as a coded derogatory term for squad leaders or platoon sergeants (ranks E6 or E7)...coded because the term sounds a bit like radio nomenclature. “The Prick 7 is acting up” would actually mean that the $!&@ platoon sergeant is in a bad mood.

INT QRK is Morse pro sign for “how is my signal strength?” (I was a Morse Op at one time). If there is a dual meaning, I don’t know.

M1 thumb was what could happen if the bolt slammed forward and caught your thumb. Not old enough to have messed with the M1, but M60 thumb almost got me medically released from Ranger school (the RI was NOT happy to find out I’d been hiding it).
INT - Interrogatory (How's/What'\s my)
QRK - Signal Strength.



PRC 6, PRC 7

334711


PRC 10
334712
 

·
Registered
Denver, Colo
Joined
·
625 Posts
Here are a few more I'll ask. Try to guess. (No Fair looking them up).
This is military speak for common items. Decades ago I heard the military spent:

3 million dollars on calcium-trace display units. What did they buy?
2 million dollars on hydro-blast force cups. What did they buy?

A military helicopter went down and crashed in the 1980s. The official finding was that:
A hexagonal rotating compression unit underwent catastrophic stress-related shaft detachment.
What happened?
I saw this on a Jay Leno special on TV sometime back in the 80s.
3 million dollars on calcium-trace display units. = Chalkboards.
2 million dollars on hydro-blast force cups. = Toilet Plungers.

A military helicopter went down and crashed in the 1980s. The official finding was that:
A hexagonal rotating compression unit underwent catastrophic stress-related shaft detachment.
What happened? = A Hex Nut Failed.
 
1 - 20 of 23 Posts
Top