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Curious how others jack the rear of their tri-five to get the axle and tires off the floor for maintenance? I need to remove my old school Mr. Gasket traction bars for a trip thru the bead blaster and then a prime and paint. Strictly for the 60's old school look, don't hammer the throttle really hard and I know there are better setups. Just built my 57 like a high school kid would have done in the 60s. It's the look I grew up with graduating in 67 remember some really sharp looking cars in the school parking lot. .

My method is using a hydraulic jack on the center pumpkin, raise to the desired height and place jack stands under the frame at a point closest to the rear axle. Never thought about it before but is there any concern possibly to the rear pumpkin mating surface/seal for creating a leak? Never have had a problem but am curious how others do it. Trying to get the last few tidbits taken care of before taking the 57 to it's first car show next month.

Couple pics of it, 2 door sedan, 210, bored and cammed 283 w dual four carbs on stock '57 aluminum intake, headers, M-21 4 speed Muncie with Mr. Gasket bench seat shifter, 3:55 posi. Dual full length exhaust with Thrush mufflers. Totally "old school" and my former 1/4 mile toy.
 

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If you want the wheel to drop down, jack on the frame...Otherwise you can jack on the axle.
 

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I knew I wanted to be able to raise and lower my 55 quickly and easily...and my shop has a low-ish (~7.5') ceiling. So I bought an old style air (bumper) jack for $50 on craigslist, then set up my chassis with jacking hardpoints in front and back behind the bumpers out of sight. I also fabricated brackets on the jack to meet up with the hardpoints so now I can have the car up in the air very quickly. Works great and I use it all the time.

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Cocke County, TN. 55 Bel Air Sport Coupe
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I knew I wanted to be able to raise and lower my 55 quickly and easily...and my shop has a low-ish (~7.5') ceiling. So I bought an old style air (bumper) jack for $50 on craigslist, then set up my chassis with jacking hardpoints in front and back behind the bumpers out of sight. I also fabricated brackets on the jack to meet up with the hardpoints so now I can have the car up in the air very quickly. Works great and I use it all the time.

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I recall as a kid at a friends Dad's garage he had two of those jacks. First I've seen even a picture of one since the 70's.
 

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Cocke County, TN. 55 Bel Air Sport Coupe
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With a 12 bolt and it's stamped rear cover, I always worried about cracking the center section so I have a 2x6 with a 3/4" piece on the front end so the weight is distributed towards the front of it also. Since I installed a cast aluminum cover I suppose it's really overkill, but old habits are hard to break. (just like the center sections are hard to break)
 

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55 Tony - I grew up on a horse farm and I remember my Dad buying out a bunch of stuff from a local service station when the guy was retiring and closing his business. Huge compressor, air jack similar to the one I found on craigslist and a bunch of air tools. We used the heck out of that stuff on the farm, and of course all my buddies and I would gather with our cars in the machine shed on friday and saturday nights to drink beer and work on our cars. Back then we all jacked our cars right up by the bumpers to put them on jack stands, which is absolutely not possible with modern cars!
 

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copymutt - I have a 25 gal aluminum gas tank in my car, so I used a large (maybe 2.5" x 2.5"?) piece of angle that's 1/4" thick, then I cut a slot into a 1" piece of black pipe and welded the two together. My intent is to have lifting points that are strong and roughly match the circular the shape of my brackets on the car. This provides positive engagement when I'm lifting the car, so it can't slip off while I'm setting jack stands. It's tucked up high enough behind the bumper so unless you get on the ground you can't see it. Also has the added benefit of shielding the gas tank a bit, although I think if I'm in a position to need that then I probably have bigger problems.

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The tow hitch on my 57 wgn is welded to the frame. Position the Craftsman 1-1/2 ton floor jack under the hitch and jack the car high enough to position Sunnex 4-legged 12-ton jack stands under the frame.
 

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I bought an air style bumper jack from Northern Tool but it was way more than $50. It is rated at 2500 pounds and that is pretty accurate. I tried raising the front of my 2012 Expedition that weighs 6000 pounds and it would not do it. It will raise a vehicle about two feet.
 

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I have no problem buying new tools of any kind when needed, but have found a ton of great deals on craigslist. The guy I bought the air jack from was moving out of state, and he demo'd the thing working by picking up the back end of his tahoe (by the hitch method mentioned above).
 

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I have no problem buying new tools of any kind when needed, but have found a ton of great deals on craigslist. The guy I bought the air jack from was moving out of state, and he demo'd the thing working by picking up the back end of his tahoe (by the hitch method mentioned above).
That does have safety pawl(s) in it I hope, in case it blows a seal or something. Or of course use jack stands.
I would love to have one of those but with my limited space I'd probably pass one up, even at $50.
 

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Yes they have been building them the same way pretty much since the beginning of time, with gravity-operated safety pawls that would prevent the jack from dropping more than a few inches in the event of a seal failure. But as I said initially, the purpose for me is to be able to get my 55 up in the air as high as I can (in my current shop) quickly and easily. I would never get under any car until/unless it was properly supported by jack stands.
 

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In the early 80s me & a partner opened a garage after the Dealership we worked at went out of business we bought one of those jacks heavy enough to lift Frito Lay vans that we had a contract to work on.They worked good But they can be dangerous also.I was looking out the office window just in time to see my partner & the jack doing a flip in the air he crushed his knee cap & I got to work by myself in a brand new business for the next six weeks while he healed. The dumb a-- had left the truck in gear so the rear wheels couldn't move which caused the jack to jump out from under the frame & threw him in the air like a rag doll. Neither one of us ever did that again.
 

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Having an interstate nearby, there’s always a good supply of tractor trailer tire shrapnel on the edges of the trouble lanes. I sometimes use a 6”x6” piece on the jack shoe as a cushion so that there’s no metal to metal contact from the jack. I also use smaller pieces to cushion the jack stands. Tractor trailer tires are a lot thicker rubber than passenger car tires so they make for good tough rubber pads.


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