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A neighbor who is from Georgia was telling me the other day about kudzu, and how it's taking over the south. I guess I didn't think much about it at the time. I just spent the last half hour reading and looking at pictures of it though and was amazed at the stuff. Sure glad I don't have to deal with it where I live.

Would sure like to hear from guys in the south on this issue. Is it as bad as what I've read about it?
 

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Here is the story of this wonderful plant.I didn't realize it had been here this long.

The kudzu plant was introduced to the United States in 1876 at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.[5][6][12] Kudzu was introduced to the Southeast in 1883 at the New Orleans Exposition. The vine was widely marketed in the Southeast as an ornamental plant to be used to shade porches,[5][13] and in the first half of the 20th century, kudzu was distributed as a high-protein content cattle fodder and as a cover plant to prevent soil erosion. The Soil Erosion Service recommended the use of kudzu to help control erosion of slopes which led to the government-aided distribution of 85 million seedlings and government-funded plantings of kudzu which paid $19.75 per hectare.[5] By 1946, it was estimated that 1,200,000 hectares (3,000,000 acres) of kudzu had been planted.[5] When boll weevil infestations and the failure of cotton crops drove farmers to move from rural to urban districts, kudzu plantings were left unattended.[5] The climate and environment of the Southeastern United States allowed the kudzu to grow virtually unchecked. In 1953 the United States Department of Agriculture removed kudzu from a list of suggested cover plants and listed it as a weed in 1970. By 1997, the vine was placed on the “Federal Noxious Weed List”.[3][5] Today, kudzu is estimated to cover 3,000,000 hectares (7,400,000 acres) of land in the southeastern United States, mostly in Alabama, Georgia, Florida, and Mississippi.[5][9] It has been recorded in Nova Scotia, Canada, in Columbus, Ohio, and in all five boroughs of New York City.[
 

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have heard nothing about this. :confused0024:
 

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Just did the 127 route trip in Tenn and Ky saw miles of this stuff ,,,
Yes, there is a lot of it near me that is too close for comfort. Just a few years ago I always told myself that if it came into my woods I'd fight it tooth and nail cutting at least the vines going up trees, but these days I have trouble navigating trough the woods up and down the steep hills. All I can do for now is hope it doesn't come my way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, there is a lot of it near me that is too close for comfort. Just a few years ago I always told myself that if it came into my woods I'd fight it tooth and nail cutting at least the vines going up trees, but these days I have trouble navigating trough the woods up and down the steep hills. All I can do for now is hope it doesn't come my way.
Seems kinds scary. The pic that lonejacklarry posted makes it look even scarier.
I read last night that it's in more states than I thought, it's even showed up in Oregon too! Alien attack!
 

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I used some of the Poison Ivy Roundup On a small area of it & it did a pretty good job on it. As long as you don't let it get to far ahead of you & respray regurlarly you can at least control it. They say that the roots can lay dormant for years & still come back. Van
 

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Seems kinds scary. The pic that lonejacklarry posted makes it look even scarier.
I read last night that it's in more states than I thought, it's even showed up in Oregon too! Alien attack!
That picture is nowhere near as bad as it gets. I've seen acres and acres of woods covered with kudzu. Not too long until the trees all die, rot, and start falling down. On the flip side, horses love it and it's healthy for them too!
 
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