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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I've searched but can't seem to come up with an answer. Can someone with a Lakewood bellhousing setup measure the thickness of the block plate for me? Fabbing one is no big deal here in the shop, and I want it thick enough without being overkill.
Thanks,
Bud
 

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I think 1/8" but too many rivers under the bridge - someone will be here soon I'm certain.
 

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I am also thinking 1/8" (10-11 gauge) but I'd rather know for sure.
It's not really the thickness but the strength of the material it's made from that counts. Certainly, thickness applies though.
 

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mine measures .120" thick
 

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The one I have hanging up on the wall is 1/8".


Don
 

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Now check the Rockwell hardness (temper) of the steel. I believe it is tempered but don't know for sure maybe 1/4 hard, 1/2 hard??? If you need a scattersheild and block plate it's better to be safe than sorry.....

Don
 

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I think the block plate is simply mild steel, 1018 or 1020. Not enough carbon in that alloy to have hardenability.
 

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I think the block plate is simply mild steel, 1018 or 1020. Not enough carbon in that alloy to have hardenability.
Yeah Rick but we're both just thinking here and not sure. I recall there was a knock out section for the starter hole on mine. It was struck by the punching die but not completely sheared. The instructions said it could be "knocked out" for use if necessary which makes me think it has some amount of temper. But again I'm not certain...just thinking (wondering).

If it's 1018 or 1020 dragging a file over the edge will tell soon enough!

Don
 

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Went to Lakewood Catalog to confirm thickness. Text at "Block Plates" states 1/8" High Strength Steel - Doesn't define what steel though. Rick you work with steel all day, what's your take on this?

 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
This has turned into a little more interesting conversation than I expected. I could go buy a block plate, I guess, but I've been a Millwright/Welder for about 40 years so never really thought about it. Just figured I'd build one, certainly have all the equipment I need here in the shop. Hadn't occurred to me that it might be more than just mild steel, since it really doesn't do a lot more than protect the block and your investment in case of clutch/flywheel explosion, although they are advertised as helping to contain the pieces. The bellhousing is the main safety device. I'm doubting that the bellhousing I have is SFI rated since it does have some years on it, but it's nice and undamaged. Standard Hotrolled and Pickled A36 sheet has a yield strength of 30K psi, could use 4130 moly sheet with a yield of about 50K psi, but it gets kinda pricey and the point of fabbing it myself is gone.
A little unsure, now. Summit sells a complete unit for $370, so I can't think that a block plate for one could cost a lot, maybe I'm overthinking this.
Bud
 

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eBay item number:

120434035315

Cajunjon has them nice quality for $43 on ebay. I was pleased with the one I bought.
 

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Hadn't occurred to me that it might be more than just mild steel, since it really doesn't do a lot more than protect the block and your investment in case of clutch/flywheel explosion, although they are advertised as helping to contain the pieces.
Bud
Moons ago I went to cut the tri5 ears off a Lakewood. With terms thrown around like "blowproof" and "scattershield" I was thinking it'd be made out something off a tank or a battleship. When I actually started cutting I was amazed at how soft the steel was. Cut like butter by using my die grinder.
 

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Moons ago I went to cut the tri5 ears off a Lakewood. With terms thrown around like "blowproof" and "scattershield" I was thinking it'd be made out something off a tank or a battleship. When I actually started cutting I was amazed at how soft the steel was. Cut like butter by using my die grinder.

Don't let that influence you in the least. I own a metal stamping business and all of our dies are made of D2 or ASP23 steel. Very hard. When we have them sharpened we use a surface grinder to remove .005-.007 to renew the cutting edges. Grinding or EDM is the method used in cutting these hardened steels.

Don
 
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