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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Let say a guy wanted to lose the gas door on a his 55 sedan. I would think he would cut out a secton big enough to remove the complete opening then butt weld a section from a donor 56. I was told to lap weld it last weekend by a fellow car guy. It seems any lap joint, especially on the inside of a fender would lend itself moisture inbetween the joint. "Am I right or am I right?"
 

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Lap welding is much easier to do, but if it were me, I'd butt weld it.

Less manipulation is required to smooth the joint over, and ALSO it leaves no place for moisture to hide and work it's evil task.
 

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Lap joint bad...baaaaaaaaaadddddddd...he he he. I would cut a piece to fit exactly in the original opening set it in and weld. Do small welds. Maybe 3/16ths of an inch each time and skip around so as to keep the heat down. The stamped edge around the original opening will help keep the area straight.
 

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Lap joints are quick and easy in the beginning part of the project but as you move further on you will create your self more problems in blending the panel in to the existing . Although if you flange or (joggle ) you have more success in blending your work. However longevity will not be on your side as will find moisture and possibly bleed threw an otherwise good repair.:( But weld is superior and will net you a finer finished product for your hours. there are a few tips that will help you along the way .One make your filler panel as close to the size of the whole as possible , and when welding tack all your corners and mid points to secure the panel from moving in or out on any of the edges .:eek: Only a few tacks at a time will do, grab a magazine to keep you occupied while waiting so you don't get over anxious and try to do to much at once. Now onece you have gone all around with a solid weld you need to work the heat affected zone (HAZ) by planishing with a hammer and dolly . This is the area that is blue in color around your weld were it has shrunk and pulled on the panel . now you can grind litely and take any high or low spots out were needed and head for the paint store. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
But weld it is then

What gauge is the factory sheetmetal on the 55, 18? If I don't have to hack up the 56 I'd rather not. Mike, reguarding your post, I could just leave to opening and cut in a filler? Sounds too easy :eek:
 

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Hi A55C4<-------(insert name here) :D
Most automotive sheet metal is 19 crs ( cold roll steel ) But 18 is OK , the difference in the thickness is minimal. It is only slightly tougher to shape , in your case were you are doing such a small repair area you will hardley see the difference. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
This is all good info. I'm sure I will have more. I'm just about ready to to get serious about the body work. This is a learn as I go process and so far this is a great site to find answers.

Thanks again
 
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