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Hi Bama
Well lacquer is not a bad choice but getting harder to find in the color you may have in mind , Enamel (straight up) is not bad if you want to paint your car and the rest of the neighborhood.:eek: Today's choice would be a base coat clear coat . It's very forgiving and very adjustable to climate for sprayability <-----is that a word ? but the nice part is you can adjust your color before you clearcoat and buff out the clear to have the end results of a pro paint job the first time . :) Be sure to keep us abreast on your project so we can help you on a step by step process to make your paint go a little smoother and enjoyable.
 

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YES!

Base coat with clear.

I'll try to keep this story short:
In college the only transportation I could afford was an older used sportbike. A CBR600. Within the first two weeks, it got stolen and I didn't have insurance on it yet. I didn't even have a license plate on it yet!

Anyway, I got it back but it had been partially stripped, with almost no body work. I went to local junk yards and ended up with a "lego bike." All the parts fit, but they were totally different colors.

I decided to paint it myself. I bought a small hobby airbrush and small compressor. Really small, like you would paint model cars with. Body panels are small on a motorcycle, so this was fine.

Then I went to the paint store. I said, "Set me up!" And they did! We decided on a two part PPG urathane paint system that does not require rubbing out. I think it was PPG "Deltron 2000" acrylic urethane. The base coat goes on semi flat, and then the clear top coat makes it come alive. It was wicked expensive, I think retail was over $400. After working with me, hearing my story and such, the guy gave me commercial paint pricing and I was out of there for about $250. Plastic primer, catalyst/hardner for the clear, quart of yellow, quart of white, quart of clear, 1 gallon of reducer and (I am hazy on this) some kind of thinner to clean my air brush.

The review:
Wow. Seriously. I would have never dreamed a rookie could make a paint job look so good. I would have liked to say it was me, but it was the paint. The base coats go on super smooth. It dries in minutes (literally) and is almost impossible to ruin with drips and such. If memory serves, you could handle a painted part in 20 minutes! By the time I cleared the air brush of base coat and loaded it with clear- the body panel was ready for the clear coat! The finished product looked amazing. It really did have a hand rubbed look, just like the paint shop guy said it would.

oh crap. I said I would keep it short. oh well. Funny side note: I was living in an apartment at the time I painted the bike, so I painted it INSIDE the apartment! I made a tent out of plastic. I removed a single body panel at a time and painted it, put it back on the bike and grabbed the next piece. It took me about 2 weeks. The paint smell was strong, and I somehow managed to get a little overspray into the apartment. Kudos to my live in girlfriend at the time. I can't belive she let me get away with that.
 

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This is a little off topic, but back in the earley 80's a fellow brought me a tank from a 750 Kawasaki that was scratched and needed painting. I called the dealer for the paint and when all was said and done it was less expensive to buy a new tank in the right color than to repaint his.
 

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I'm sure I'm not the most qualified to answer paint a body question but yes, prep the metal waork then shoot the base coat. It goes on and dries quickly in a flat sheen. It can be taped and shot with another color or colors in a short period of time. If repairs or redo's need to be done there is little or no problem. When satified with the base coat the clear coats are then applied. I would say usually three or more coats. The next step is wet sanding the clear to get all the imperfections out. I once shot a truck outside and had a huge 4 winged critter landed and get stuck in a wet coat of clear. Have to expect that if you shoot outside I guess. I got him or her out then gave the area another good coat of clear knowing I would have some extra work in that area with sanding and buffing. The next morning I used a single edge razor and used it as a scraper, and got the runs flat with the rest of the surface then went to 800 grit wet wrapped around short piece of paint stir stick. I shot that truck in white and only went to 1200 grit and buffed with a product called tri buff and used a sheep skin type pad on my buffer. A finer finish is accomplished by finishing with a finer grit paper and foam pads the a series of buffing compounds. But all and all one can get a pretty nice paint job right in their own garage. I plan on doing my 55 myself again,but have to thank the ones in this forum for all the help and advice. One thing I would advise is a HVLP spray gun. Hight volume low pressure. I think my first gun was under $75.00
 

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Been about 13 years since my last paint job. Used a cheap high pressure gun and shot at 55 to 65 lbs pressure. Used Centari 2 part paints. The base coat / Clear coat systems were still very youg then. I'll be at school soon enough as I start the body on my '56.
Dave
 

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Soft Paint

Last fall I painted my 57 with base coat and clear. I am still assembling the car and wanted to do a little touch up with a spray gun. I sanded a small spot down to the primer and then started to put on some base coat. Immediately the paint started to raise all around the spot. It seems like all the paint is softer than it should be. It does have a very good shine when i buffed after the paint job. i am wondering if it will harden up or if I need to do a complete strip job? It is like a nightmare! I followed the product sheets to the tee, so I don't know what may have gone wrong. If any one can give me some advice it would be appreciated.
Thanks
 

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Soft Paint

Doing your own painting is a great way to save some money,
but be sure you read all the safety precautions associated with
each of the components - and follow them.
There are some dangerous components/ingredients.
A respirator and goggles are a must - I believe the isocyonates (sp ?)
can enter the body through your eyes if unprotected.

I'm not a painter, but I've called on a lot of body shops,
and PBE jobbers in the course of demo-ing and selling the line of
car care products I distribute. I've found that in many instances,
the person selling you the paint supplies, will presume that the person
purchasing them, is fully aware of the precautions that should be taken.

FWIW...

Rich Warner - "Mr-Shine"
 

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Rich or whoever may know
Recently had my 56 painted w/urethane and clearcoat. Not sure what type urethane or how many coats of clear or what. Obviously I am a complete retard when it comes to painting a car.
Anyway the job turned out very well but they didn't paint the spare wheel. They gave me a can of urethane that matches to paint it with.
My question is what do you thin the urethane with?
Thanks in advance
Bud S.
 

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You shouldn't need to thin it because the activator should make it a lot thinner by itself. But if it's still too thick there is a reducer you can use. Use the same brand reducer as the paint.
 

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That's good news-thanks
I thought it seemed real thin when I shook it but didn't know about thinning it.
Sandblasted and primed my rim so I'll take a wack at shooting it in a couple of days. I've got a HVLP sprayer that I can blame the results on.
 

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My choice is lacquer for the beginner and the home garage. Yes, you are going to do more work, but you also don't have to worry about killing your lungs or any other body part. Lacquer is very forgiving - mess up, just wait a few minutes - sand out the mistake and shoot again. Solid colors are very good for the beginner, don't have to add clear unless you want too and touchups are a breeze. Try matching your basecoat/clearcoat deal in 6 months - good luck! You just about have to do an entire panel to get it to look even close. If you are shooting metallics then you need to clearcoat it, and you will be rubbing out the clearcoat. By the way, rubbing out the paint isn't that big a deal either, just a bit of muscle on the finer lines of the car, most of the panels can be handled with a powered buffing tool.

Lacquer is getting more difficult to buy that's for sure, but my local store still carries a variety of thinners and primers for it - but no topcoats. Most lacquers can mixed with any good quality thinner so thats not a problem. Oh, you mixed up way more than you need? Just pour it back in the paint can - no problem. Try that with your newer paints and you have a $200 can of junk paint. Waited too long to clean the gun, no problem - just soak it in thinner it'll come clean. But if it's a newer catalized paint, toss out your gun - it's done.

Try the Restoration Shop for a complete lineup of colors, they even factory match paint codes in lacquer if you need it. Have fun and don't worry about mistakes, they can be fixed easily and only you will know.
 
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