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I did all the bodywork on my Nomad in lead in the early 80's. I was going to re-do it all in lead when I replaced my panels, but I convinced myself that the new fillers are just as good. Lead bodywork isn't that hard to do, just more expensive and time-consuming. Lead isn't that easy to get anymore like it used to be.
 

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I used lead on my '56 (finished in '92) because I wanted everything done as it would be new (painted in Nitrocellulous Lacquer also).

My '55 I've started working on will use filler (very little I hope) but I've had a lot of success if used properly.
 

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For a second there I thought you said Nitrocellulose lacquer (a flammable liquid used primarily as a binder in fireworks compositions) :vroam:
 

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"For a second there I thought you said Nitrocellulose lacquer (a flammable liquid used primarily as a binder in fireworks compositions)For a second there I thought you said Nitrocellulose lacquer (a flammable liquid used primarily as a binder in fireworks compositions)"

So far the car hasn't blown up. Yes, all original lacquers (and GM) up until 1957 used Nitrocellulose lacquer. Can still be bought in mixed colors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Checked the Eastwood page, obviously I can see only the most serious bodymen are going to use lead.

So for the dumb question of the day since I haven't 'bondoed' in a while...what's the preferred brand of plastic filler these days? I'ts just a small area I need it for.
I guess I answered my own question, surfing the web, lots of info out there,
for example:

http://www.roadsters.com/filler
 
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