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I need to replace my entire fuel line from the tank to the carb. on my 57. I have a mixture of 5/16 steel/rubber hoses etc.
I also have a carter electric fuel pump and filter installed downstream from the tank which needs relocation. I am thinking of using braided steel fuel lines and AN fittings. Amazon has a 20 ft kit with various fittings. The filter and pump have 3/8 connections. I also will replace the fuel tank float assembly. It all goes to a 600 CFM carb. on a 350.
Has anyone done anything like this? I don't want to use fuel hose if I can get around that.
John
 

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I use 3/8" hard lines where possible, then flare the line and use AN - 6 fittings to flex lines everywhere else.

I enclosed my electric fuel pump inside an aluminum box mounted to the panel I used to blank out the spare tire well.
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My fuel line is routed up on top of my transmission then meets the carb. from the rear. (Mostly to clean up the engine compartment.
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Thanks Robert
I would be concerned about using AN line the full length I ran hard line front to rear did a 37* flare & AN fittings & lines on both ends 3.5' on the front to the fuel rails 2.0'at the rear to a corvette filter regulator then AN to the tank supply & return. The reason I would be concerned is the long term deterioration of the AN hose due to the fuels we run today, at least with short runs of AN hose it is easier to replace & I have considered this winter removing the front & rear sections & having PTFE hoses made up to replace the AN currently on the car now.
 

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John, I ran a piece of nicopp 3/8 line and then adapter fittings for a short piece steel braided line from my tank to the carter pump and fuel filter. then I ran another short piece of steel braded line from the output of the carter to an adapter fitting, and then ran the remainder of the lines in 3/8 nicopp. You can do the same in 5/16 nicopp. The nicopp is not expensive, is meant for the purpose, flares easily, seats in the fittings and no leaks, and best of all, bends easily.
 

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John, I ran a piece of nicopp 3/8 line and then adapter fittings for a short piece steel braided line from my tank to the carter pump and fuel filter. then I ran another short piece of steel braded line from the output of the carter to an adapter fitting, and then ran the remainder of the lines in 3/8 nicopp. You can do the same in 5/16 nicopp. The nicopp is not expensive, is meant for the purpose, flares easily, seats in the fittings and no leaks, and best of all, bends easily.
The nicopp 3/8 is what I used for my hard line from front to rear after buying 3/8 stainless line & was unable to flare the ends with my snap on double flaring tool or my son's hydraulic flaring tool either.
 

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I actually had stainless line installed originally but it leaked and I could not stop the leaking and also could not flare the stainless. I used the short pieces of steel braided at either side of the fuel pump for a little vibration control. But the rest of the liens were the nicopp. Did all that in 2015, not a drip or issue since.
 

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John, I ran a piece of nicopp 3/8 line and then adapter fittings for a short piece steel braided line from my tank to the carter pump and fuel filter. then I ran another short piece of steel braded line from the output of the carter to an adapter fitting, and then ran the remainder of the lines in 3/8 nicopp. You can do the same in 5/16 nicopp. The nicopp is not expensive, is meant for the purpose, flares easily, seats in the fittings and no leaks, and best of all, bends easily.
What Flaring tool did you use or recommend? To many to choose from.
 

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The truth? A standard old style flaring tool set I purchased in the late 1970s when I was in high school, the one in the little red box. Yes, hard to believe I know but I still have it. Mine is probably KD or some sort of off brand from the era but it looks just like this.


Frankly, it is one of the reasons I liked the Nicopp as much as I did in that it bent easily, cut and deburred easily, flared easily, and seated easily. All of the things us backyard hackers need, lol! You know, sometimes easy is good.
 

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The truth? A standard old style flaring tool set I purchased in the late 1970s when I was in high school, the one in the little red box. Yes, hard to believe I know but I still have it. Mine is probably KD or some sort of off brand from the era but it looks just like this.


Frankly, it is one of the reasons I liked the Nicopp as much as I did in that it bent easily, cut and deburred easily, flared easily, and seated easily. All of the things us backyard hackers need, lol! You know, sometimes easy is good.
I'm all about easy, Thanks
 

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I've had my old snap on double flare probably since 1970 when the Snap on tool man would come to the dealership & you could go into debt plenty deep & I certainly managed to stay that way for years..
 
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