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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read the Mig or Tig thread but am wondering what are the advantages and disadvantages of each type of welder? Also what sort of material thickness can you weld with a single phase (240v in Aust.) Tig Welder. I cant decide which way to go with my purchase!
 

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Hi Fifty6
With 240 volts at hand its up to you to pick the amp and duty cycle of welder. Now the Mig it quite a bit easier to learn compared to the Tig. The Mig is alot less fussy when it comes to rust or contaminated steel. I guess if I had to suggest one it would be the Mig. I use both quite often but for qwick tacks and inconvenient locations and body possitions for the begginer or even novice the Mig would be my choice. I guess if you look at like this, do you want to spend lots of time learning how to use the welder or do you want to put it to work? :D
Now as far as the Tig is concerned Once you do master it the welds are superior when it comes to penatration. For instance say you need need to modify a suspenssion part that may be one to two inches thick, the Tig will supply you with superior penatration. This is something I would not suggest you pick up and do yourself. Most local colleges have evening classes on welding and will give you hands on training and will give you better understanding of which welder will suite your needs best.
Now if you are just interested in doing light tin work Tig will give you that almost invisible weld once mastered.


In the photo's above the flange was welded on with a Tig and no filler rod, and ground down with 80 grit on a three inch angle grinder and can be pollished with 220 to make a weld free looking flange.
Not that this can't be done with Mig but with a lot more grinding.
Here is another welded seem with tig.

At this point the panel needs ground and planished, I will have to try to retrieve the finished product from my shop computer.
Hope this gave you some good input on which welder will work best for your situation. If I mist something dont be shy , target a question and we will try to help. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the info. Great job too!! I am a toolmaker by trade so have few welding hours under my belt, however mostly arc and some mig. I have used a tig once before. I'm looking at a Cigweld arc/tig welder & I'm happy to spend a little time learning if that is what is going to give the best results, I want to buy a quality m/c that will last a long time and also do the best job possible.
Cheers.
Brent.
 
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