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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With four half shims in the outer starter hole I still cannot get the proper starter/flexplate alignment on my mini starter (not quite half a tooth). The rule of thumb says "no more than four shims". The flexplate is new. The only solution I can see is to grind down the starter mount and make any minor shim adjustments at that stage. Anybody have to do any grinding on the mount? If so, did you do it yourself or take it to a machine shop?
 

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Just A thought and not sure whether this applies to Mini Starters but I know you can have meshing problems if you use the wrong starter ( offset or Parallel mounting holes) with the wrong size flex plate.
 

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After a few hundred starts, my starter and flexplace wasn't mateing up, shimmmed the starter, took it to a starter repairman and he extended the gear, finally pulled the flexplate cover and shined a light up and the flexplate was cracked between the bolt holes. May take a look and see. We changed it without removing the trans, put long bolts in bell housing and barely moved the trans back, just enough the get a wrench up in there. Keep this in mind . Charles :wavey:
 

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The flexplate is new. The only solution I can see is to grind down the starter mount and make any minor shim adjustments at that stage. Anybody have to do any grinding on the mount?
Am i missing something? You shim a starter to get it further away. You`d be making it closer if you grind on it. Which way is it hitting? I had to shim on mine between the starter and the mounting block to move the starter back away from the flywheel to stop it from hitting.
Terry
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A lesson in Starter/Flexplate Alignment 101:

If your starter drive is too close to the flywheel/flexplate you use a shim across both bolts to increase the clearance. As strange as it may seem, if it is too far away, you use half shims on the outer bolt hole. This tips the starter inward causing the drive to move closer to the flexplate. My problem is that even if I shim the outer bolt I still can't get the driver close enough to the flexplate. That is why I am thinking my only chance to save this starter is to remove material from the mounting plate and then shim where necessary.
 

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A lesson in Starter/Flexplate Alignment 101:

If your starter drive is too close to the flywheel/flexplate you use a shim across both bolts to increase the clearance. As strange as it may seem, if it is too far away, you use half shims on the outer bolt hole. This tips the starter inward causing the drive to move closer to the flexplate. My problem is that even if I shim the outer bolt I still can't get the driver close enough to the flexplate. That is why I am thinking my only chance to save this starter is to remove material from the mounting plate and then shim where necessary.
I'm not sure about your Lesson 101.........:confused0006: You may want to re-think that one.
 

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I had trouble with two mini starters on my BB and on advice I bought a 95's 350 truck starter, smaller than the older style starters and it went in without shimming, good day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
MrferrisJr.

I already thought about it long and hard and also questioned how this would work. Then I tried it. I don't know what is the problem with my starter but without any shims the drive just touches the outer edge of a new flexplate. I tried three flat washers at the outer hole between the block and starter just to see what would happen. This caused the starter to tip inward and the drive and flexplate appeared to mesh properly. I tried the paper clip test and there was a slight drag on the paper clip between the drive tooth and flexplate tooth. This, I understand is the proper setting. There is no way that I will bolt it up with that many flat washers as I don't believe it will stay tight and aligned. That is why it looks like the only option is to have the mounting block machined.

Jegs installation instructions include the following:

COMMON QUESTIONS

1) Why do the teeth on the starter pinion wear off prematurely? This is caused by pinion and ring gear not being in the proper position to each other. Many things can contribute to this including excessive center distance between to pinion and ring gear, excessive pinion runout in the starter clutch, or
excessive runout in the ring gear itself. The solution is to remove any shims between the starter and the engine block and check the clutch assembly in the starter. If no shims are installed, then either shim under the outboard bolt only to roll the pinion toward the ring gear or machine excess material from the mounting surface of the starter.
 

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Had to grind mine...

The only solution I can see is to grind down the starter mount and make any minor shim adjustments at that stage. Anybody have to do any grinding on the mount? If so, did you do it yourself or take it to a machine shop?
Yes, I had same problem as you with a mini starter, plus when the pinion gear kicked in, it would not fully engage across the teeth of the starter ring on the flywheel, about 1/8" shy.

In order to get mine to align correctly, I ground down my mount by hand by clamping my side grinder (with 8" disk) to my work bench, then after locking the mount in a huge vise grip (the part gets very hot if you attempt to hold it in your hand) Hence, I used the vise grip to hold the mount to the face of the grinding stone, held it even and flat across both bolt holes, grinding little by little, and eventually, through trial and error, I finally got it ground down where the pinion fit properly up into the starter ring like it should.

However, to get the pinion to fully engage across the starter ring, I took the c ring clip off the pinion shaft that holds the retainer ring and spring on the back end of the pinion shaft, after removing the retainer and spring, I ground the retainer ring down about 1/8" (the portion of the ring that's coming in contact with the backside of the starter gear, inside the starter, which is what's keeping the pinion shaft from fully extending out and engaging across the starter ring), but even after doing that, I also had to clip the spring down about 1/4" because the fully collaped spring still held the pinion back. However, after shorting the spring and grinding the retainer ring down, when I got it all back together, the pinion fully engages across the starter ring and the shortened spring still has plenty of strength to disengage the pinion after starting. It now works perfectly and I've not had any problems since. :tu
 

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Fred, I'm not sure what you have there for a mini starter but the only time I have seen a problem like this is when a customer supplied the cheapest POS made in China starter he could get. I installed a GM mini and problem solved with no shims required. Plain and simple, You should not have to grind anything to make it work. :anim_25:

-Bruce
 

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1956 chevy 210 del rey sedan
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I agree with the last post . get yourself a good starter . look at it this way do you want to deal with this headache when the starter dies and you are 100 miles from home . get a good starter thet works without any monkey biz. :party0031::party0031:
 

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1956 chevy 210 del rey sedan
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I got a napa starter for a 99 gm yukon . it is the permanent magnet type and turns my big block over like butter . part # NAE76110 also there is part #NAE76057 also get the bolts that go with the one you buy ..good luck
 
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