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Jim....That sure brings back old memories.....Did mine in yellow and black, as I remember....Also ran the cheater slicks.

 

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Does anyone remember doing this to their rims or was it just a local fad in the Detroit area? I saw it a lot in the early 60's. JIM.
I can remember some guys at the local dragstrip doing it but I can't remember seeing it done on the street... Later, Dave
 

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A guy who owned a restored '65 Chevelle Wagon (2-door version) did that to his wheels.

I figured it was an old drag racer thing.
 

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Alternating/contrasting paint pattern on wheels

Does anyone remember doing this to their rims or was it just a local fad in the Detroit area? I saw it a lot in the early 60's. JIM.
This was a relatively common method of marking wheels on drag cars. The operational reason is probably obvious to drag racers and old timers, but for those that have not figured it out yet, contrast painting the wheels makes it very easy for spotters on the crew at the track to evaluate wheel spin. This was very important in the days before wrinkle-wall slicks, where chassis tuning and configuration was the only way to get even moderately powered cars to hook. The modern day equivalent, seen in mostly traction limited classes, is a single wide white stripe, painted with shoe polish, on the sidewall of the rear tire visible from the stands. Makes it very easy to do post-run video evaluation of how the car hooks after a chassis or tire pressure change.
 
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yup, remember seeing that at the track when i was younger jim. thought it just looked cool when the wheels spin. thanks for that info 57driver. learn something everyday.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Makes Sense!

This was a relatively common method of marking wheels on drag cars. The operational reason is probably obvious to drag racers and old timers, but for those that have not figured it out yet, contrast painting the wheels makes it very easy for spotters on the crew at the track to evaluate wheel spin. This was very important in the days before wrinkle-wall slicks, where chassis tuning and configuration was the only way to get even moderately powered cars to hook. The modern day equivalent, seen in mostly traction limited classes, is a single wide white stripe, painted with shoe polish, on the sidewall of the rear tire visible from the stands. Makes it very easy to do post-run video evaluation of how the car hooks after a chassis or tire pressure change.
Neat info to know! Thanks! JIM.
 

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I did that to a rear set of wheels on a Mercury Comet and it is definitely drag race inspired.
 

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Didn't know the reason until now but I remember half white and half black wheels. I'm guessing the guys that ran them on the street were making some sort of statement. Cool.
 

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Yeah it was popular here back in the late '60's. Seemed like every "wannabe" drag racer painted their rims like that after they showed up in the popular magazines of the day. I saw a few of the the painted rims...I think they called them here "timing rims"???...at the dragstrips in the area on "real" drag cars. It was kinda funny to see one of the guys driving his Rambler, Buick 4-door , Simca or what have you, with the rearend jacked way up in the air with red/black, orange/white, or black/white painted stock rims
 

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What he said, I also remember seeing them on stock cars at the local dirt track.

This was a relatively common method of marking wheels on drag cars. The operational reason is probably obvious to drag racers and old timers, but for those that have not figured it out yet, contrast painting the wheels makes it very easy for spotters on the crew at the track to evaluate wheel spin. This was very important in the days before wrinkle-wall slicks, where chassis tuning and configuration was the only way to get even moderately powered cars to hook. The modern day equivalent, seen in mostly traction limited classes, is a single wide white stripe, painted with shoe polish, on the sidewall of the rear tire visible from the stands. Makes it very easy to do post-run video evaluation of how the car hooks after a chassis or tire pressure change.
 

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It was kinda funny to see one of the guys driving his Rambler, Buick 4-door , Simca or what have you, with the rearend jacked way up in the air with red/black, orange/white, or black/white painted stock rim
My dad bought a '66 4-door new. So he would be aloowed to park on the Chrylser parking lot versus having to walk 1 1/2 blocks. Back in those days Chrysler was brand loyal. So, they expected their employees to be. If you drove a Furd or GM you got to walk farther to get in the building.

I learned to drive a standard shift car with this Simca. I even drove it on the streets (illegally mind you) at age 12. With my father on board.

When in hight school my youngest sister & I shared the car. Since she's older then I she was allowed to take the car by herself. One night while out with the car full of her girlfriends, the engine caught fire. They panicked and tried to douse the flames with beer. The mess wasn't pretty.
 
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