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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am just briefing a painter to put the colour onto my car. (He's a young guy, never done a classic Chevy, but has done a good few hotrods, Australian GM classics and modifieds.)

We are doing it in 2-pack, yet I want it to look reasonably authentic – so that means not making it look too deep, and as flat a surface (minimal orange peel) as possible.

And yes, this is a restore project. The colour is Highland Green, which has a light metallic in it.

The painter is suggesting the following:

2 coats of colour. Then 2 or 2 1/2 coats of clear. Then buffing the clear back to make it flatter surface, more like acrylic.

And we are likely to do all of the prep in a way that has the car assembled (for the last time) when the top coats go on.

Would any of the paint experts like to give their comment to this approach? Other than saying, 'Do it in acrylic!'. :)

Cheers
 

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Thats the correct way in my opinion to paint the car. Clear over base, to get a flat finnish no peel you will need to buff the car with several different cutters. When the paint is applied it will look dull but the clear will really bring it up, do the panels individualy and buff them the same way, :anim_25:
 

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2 coats of base and 2 or 2-1/2 coats of clear may not be enough material.

How much base you need will depend on the paint system and brand you use, and the color too. Some cover better than others, but 2 coats is not much even with a premium system. Obviously you need enough base to cover the primer and get the true color of the base.

Another factor on the base is that the old metallic colors used pretty fine particles while later models tend to use bigger ones. So the metallic mix in some brands/systems of base may be a better match than others, and some colors may be an easier match than others.

2 to 2-1/2 coats of clear is usually considered the minimum for when the clear is not color sanded/polished absolutely flat - unless your painter and his equipment are top notch. 3-4 coats of clear may be better for color sanding/polishing. You certainly don't want to sand through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
And what's the take on painting the car with all the hanging panels (trunk, doors, fenders, bonnet) already assembled?

That's the way the painter wants to do it. But previously, and from the Tri5 restoration books I have read, I had expected it to be done in pieces. Maybe wit 2-pack it's not so much of an issue?
 

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When you just paint the body you get the paint in all the hard spots to get too, all hang on panels can be worked on buffed etc easier, the last car the was completed used roughly 8 to 10 litres of base cant remember how many coats that was but it was more than 2 :anim_25:
 

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John, the reason to paint separately is so that you can paint all the backsides, jams, and edges easier.

But many painter prefer to do the car put together. This is especially true on metalllics. That way you get the same amount of color, oriented from the gun the same way across all the panel breaks - so the color and especially the metallic is uniform.
 
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