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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few years ago Colorado eliminated their emissions inspection program for gasoline vehicles. Until that time, emissions checks weren't required for diesels, but now they are. I guess they had to look like they were doing something, so they implemented a dyno-based diesel test to measure the opacity of the exhaust under a load. :rolleyes:

I hate putting my truck through that test because you first have to sign a waiver, leaving you responsible for any damage to your engine caused by the testing. When they run the test, it sounds like my truck is going to blow up so I quit watching. :eek:

Now they plan to bring back the gasoline vehicle emissions test to test for ....NOT carbon dioxide or hydrocarbons as before, but OZONE!! Apparently there is a new dyno-based test for cars now that will test specifically for ozone and nothing else. The test went from $15 to $25 per vehicle.

How is ozone generated inside an internal combustion engine anyhow? Well, apparently it's not:

"One final element in exhaust pollution is ozone (O3). This is not emitted directly but made in the air by the action of sunlight on other pollutants to form "ground level ozone", which, unlike the "ozone layer" in the high atmosphere, is regarded as a bad thing if the levels are too high. Ozone is broken down by nitrogen oxides, so one tends to be lower where the other is higher."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine#Air_pollution

So if we get more nitrogen oxides, we get less ozone. If we get more carbon monoxide, we get less carbon dioxide. :goodnight:

Seems the droids at the EPA want to eliminate all gases from our exhaust. Not long ago they declared carbon dioxide, a product of PERFECT combustion, a pollutant. So how do you limit carbon dioxide? You burn less fuel, or cause incomplete combustion.

Where do these people come from anyhow? :rolleyes:
 

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A few years ago Colorado eliminated their emissions inspection program for gasoline vehicles. Until that time, emissions checks weren't required for diesels, but now they are. I guess they had to look like they were doing something, so they implemented a dyno-based diesel test to measure the opacity of the exhaust under a load. :rolleyes:

I hate putting my truck through that test because you first have to sign a waiver, leaving you responsible for any damage to your engine caused by the testing. When they run the test, it sounds like my truck is going to blow up so I quit watching. :eek:

Now they plan to bring back the gasoline vehicle emissions test to test for ....NOT carbon dioxide or hydrocarbons as before, but OZONE!! Apparently there is a new dyno-based test for cars now that will test specifically for ozone and nothing else. The test went from $15 to $25 per vehicle.

How is ozone generated inside an internal combustion engine anyhow? Well, apparently it's not:

"One final element in exhaust pollution is ozone (O3). This is not emitted directly but made in the air by the action of sunlight on other pollutants to form "ground level ozone", which, unlike the "ozone layer" in the high atmosphere, is regarded as a bad thing if the levels are too high. Ozone is broken down by nitrogen oxides, so one tends to be lower where the other is higher."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_combustion_engine#Air_pollution

So if we get more nitrogen oxides, we get less ozone. If we get more carbon monoxide, we get less carbon dioxide. :goodnight:

Seems the droids at the EPA want to eliminate all gases from our exhaust. Not long ago they declared carbon dioxide, a product of PERFECT combustion, a pollutant. So how do you limit carbon dioxide? You burn less fuel, or cause incomplete combustion.

Where do these people come from anyhow? :rolleyes:
Laslo

First of all U really dont want my thoughts and comments on these laws and testing , And also it appears each state is different
MY THOUGHTS AND COMMENTS WOULDNT BE GOOD FOR THIS FINE AND EXCELLENT SITE WE HAV HERE @ TRI-5
POLITICS :eek:
 

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You're right, there is no ozone in tailpipe emissions. Only compounds that tend to form ozone when conditions are right for it.

Certain areas form ozone naturally under some weather conditions. The Los Angeles basin is the most notorious. The entire Gulf coast. And probably the eastern slopes of the Rockies.

Edit: removed my comments that will get this post or thread deleted. You guys probably know what I said.
 

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Denver is driving the issue about excessive levels of ozone. http://denverozone.blogspot.com/2006/12/commission-makes-right-move-on.html

On the issue of diesels: It's the kids that put a chip in their diesels so they can roll around town blowing black smoke on everyone, that is driving the Diesel opacity legislation in Colorado. Seems they ought to target those individuals rather than everyone that drives a diesel.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So if Ozone isn't created INSIDE the engine or exhaust system, why are they checking tailpipe emissions? They put a hose into the tailpipe, according to another article I read on this. This is insane...sounds like a knee-jerk reaction to a made-up problem. They have ONE testing station in town, and EVERY car has to be tested from now on as far as I can tell. I don't know if there are exemptions for old cars like there were before.

Vehicle ozone testing begins in portions of Weld, Larimer
By Staff


November 1, 2010 --
Expanded vehicle ozone emissions testing officially began Monday in portions of Weld and Larimer counties. Vehicles eligible for testing in November include new and new-to-the-area vehicles, as well as car dealer and fleet vehicles.

Vehicles with December license renewal dates will be the first required to get a test. However, not all December renewals will be due this year as most vehicles require testing only once every two years. Motorists should check their renewal postcards to determine if they must get an inspection this year.

Vehicle owners with December renewal dates may begin seeing notification on their renewal postcards as early as mid-November depending on the county in which they reside. Each county is responsible for sending out its own registration renewal notifications.

Four new Envirotest testing stations will open in Northern Colorado next week in addition to 14 already in operation in Denver and along the Front Range:

Fort Collins — 835 S.E. Frontage Road.
Greeley — 2844 W. 30th St.
Loveland — 7001 N. Franklin Ave.
Dacono — 5222 Silver Peak Ave.

Remote-sensing Rapid Screen mobile testing vans have also been deployed around the region. Vehicles that pass two Rapid Screen tests in the months before their license renewal is due can skip the visit to the emissions testing station, but are still required to pay the emissions fee as part of the renewal.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, portions of Weld and Larimer counties, along with seven Denver metro counties, are out of compliance with federal standards for ground-level ozone, a pollutant that is especially harmful to children and the elderly.

For more information, visit www.aircarecolorado.com or call 970-247-8378.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I still can't tell exactly what they're MEASURING in your exhaust to determine if you pass some stupid ozone reduction law. What exactly are they proposing to reduce and HOW?

EPA is out of control. IMO it needs to be restricted in it's powers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
So about 76% of the air we breathe and that goes through our engines is nitrogen. Somehow we have to keep that nitrogen from reacting with the oxygen or spearate it later. I thought that's what catalytic converters did. So is this just a check on the performance of out cats? Maybe.


Basic Information

Ground-level or "bad" ozone is not emitted directly into the air, but is created by chemical reactions between oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of sunlight. Emissions from industrial facilities and electric utilities, motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents are some of the major sources of NOx and VOC.

Breathing ozone, a primary component of smog, can trigger a variety of health problems including chest pain, coughing, throat irritation, and congestion. It can worsen bronchitis, emphysema, and asthma. Ground-level ozone also can reduce lung function and inflame the linings of the lungs. Repeated exposure may permanently scar lung tissue.

Ground-level ozone also damages vegetation and ecosystems. In the United States alone, ozone is responsible for an estimated $500 million in reduced crop production each year.

Under the Clean Air Act, EPA has set protective health-based standards for ozone in the air we breathe. EPA and others have instituted a variety of multi-faceted programs to meet these health-based standards. More about EPA ‘s ozone standards and regulatory actions.

Throughout the country, additional programs are being put into place to cut NOx and VOC emissions from vehicles, industrial facilities, and electric utilities. Programs are also aimed at reducing pollution by reformulating fuels and consumer/commercial products, such as paints and chemical solvents that contain VOC. Voluntary and innovative programs also encourage communities to adopt practices, such as carpooling, to reduce harmful emissions. More about EPA’s innovative programs to reduce air pollution.

Ozone (O3) is a gas composed of three oxygen atoms. It is not usually emitted directly into the air, but at ground-level is created by a chemical reaction between oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of sunlight. Ozone has the same chemical structure whether it occurs miles above the earth or at ground-level and can be "good" or "bad," depending on its location in the atmosphere.

In the earth's lower atmosphere, ground-level ozone is considered "bad." Motor vehicle exhaust and industrial emissions, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents as well as natural sources emit NOx and VOC that help form ozone. Ground-level ozone is the primary constituent of smog. Sunlight and hot weather cause ground-level ozone to form in harmful concentrations in the air. As a result, it is known as a summertime air pollutant. Many urban areas tend to have high levels of "bad" ozone, but even rural areas are also subject to increased ozone levels because wind carries ozone and pollutants that form it hundreds of miles away from their original sources.

"Good" ozone occurs naturally in the stratosphere approximately 10 to 30 miles above the earth's surface and forms a layer that protects life on earth from the sun's harmful rays.
 

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Interesting stuff. What gets me is the fact they use "OZONE" to do so many things including pruification processes and:

  • Disinfect laundry in hospitals, food factories, care homes etc.;
  • Disinfect water in place of chlorine
  • Deodorize air and objects, such as after a fire. This process is extensively used in fabric restoration
  • Kill bacteria on food or on contact surfaces;
  • Sanitize swimming pools and spas
  • Kill insects in stored grain
  • Scrub yeast and mold spores from the air in food processing plants;
  • Wash fresh fruits and vegetables to kill yeast, mold and bacteria;
  • Chemically attack contaminants in water (iron, arsenic, hydrogen sulfide, nitrites, and complex organics lumped together as "color");
  • Provide an aid to flocculation (agglomeration of molecules, which aids in filtration, where the iron and arsenic are removed);
  • Manufacture chemical compounds via chemical synthesis
  • Clean and bleach fabrics (the former use is utilized in fabric restoration; the latter use is patented);
  • Assist in processing plastics to allow adhesion of inks;
  • Age rubber samples to determine the useful life of a batch of rubber;
  • Eradicate water borne parasites such as Giardia lamblia and Cryptosporidium in surface water treatment plants.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)
Interesting stuff. What gets me is the fact they use "OZONE" to do so many things including pruification processes and:
Yeah, but it's "bad stuff", you know. :rolleyes:

There's always someone allergic to SOMETHING. So should we eliminate it just becase it bothers some people????

The EPA now considers CO2 a "pollutant". That tells you a lot about their mindset. It's no wonder this country is in so much trouble economically. :stupid:
 
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