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RIP: 06-04-2012
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How difficult is it to polish stainless trim? What equipment do you need? What are the pitfalls of doing it yourself? If a trained professional does it for you how much does it cost?

I've found that if you paint the car, the chrome looks bad, you redo the chrome and the stanless looks bad...you do the paint, chrome and stainless...and the interior looks bad. I think I need to enroll in a tech school and learn how to paint, polish and sew....

Wedwagon
 

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Heres my take on it.Your 1st question, It is not difficult IF you have small "inee" dents that can be reached and worked out from the back side. If it has sharp kinks, cracks, etc. you are better off have a pro do it OR trade it in as core and get back an original polished piece. Some dents cannot be gotton to because of mounting plates on back sides, very frustrateing. Second question, You will need a 3/4 hp. or better double arbour motor, on a sturdy stand, buffing wheels, buffing rouges, sand paper, hammers, files, home made dent removal tools made of wood or the like, etc. 3rd question, there are no pit falls if you are commited & have paciance. You will get dirty! 4th question, around here a convert stainless polish job will run around $2200 give or take depending on if they need welding and such. I do all my own except if needing welding. The pluses are you can use the same equipment to polish aluminum, brass, plastic's, copper, etc. If your going to do just this one car, send the parts out. If you are a hobbyest and plan on more "like" projects, look around for good deals on equipment or check on e-bay or sponsers here for a middle of the road polishing equipment. You don't want low end and you don't want pro quality, something in the middle. Now here is a shameless plug 4 me! If you choose not to do it yourself you can box it up and send to me for polishing. Long pieces can be put into PVC tubes with caps for shipment, it dosn't cost as much as you think to ship. I would need pic's of all 4 quote. I do a better job polishing than explaining how to do it. Maybe a video would help you decide, find one! Hope this helps, Lon
 

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RIP: 06-04-2012
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Lon,

I won't say that my stainless is perfect, but it is close to it. I would have to go out to the garage and check to see if there are any demples in the material. To be honest I think it only needs to be polished. I'll check and give you a follow-up reply.

Wedwagon
 

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Wedwagon if you want to do it yourself, patience and not rushing is the key. Sears has 2 different buffers in their tool catalog and i`m happy with the one i bought. Several different suppliers sell the materials to use. And the prices i`ve heard on having it done ranged from 10.00-18.00 a foot, so it can get costly.
Terry
 

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RIP: 06-04-2012
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1,082 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks, for the Eastwood information. If I decide to take the project on it would make great resource information. See you at the Power Big Meet.

Wedwagon
 

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RIP: 06-04-2012
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the Sears information....I think I might give it the ole college try.

Wedwagon
 

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Wedwagon this is the first stainless i have ever buffed. Otis a bought one and a converted one together has been my key. You use 3 different rouges so this way i don`t have to keep changing out buffing wheels. WW one big key advice, given to me by MikeKy, wear gloves and hang onto it very good.
Terry
 

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You know that little stainless ring that holds the sealed beams in the buckets? Well.....don't try to hold one and touch the buffer wheel with it. It will instantly roll your hand and the ring around the buffer wheel and stall the motor on the buffer. :eek:
 

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RIP: 06-04-2012
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Oh, ouch...ooou, that doesn't sound good. I thought loosing a middle finger in a snow blower was bad, but that some how sounds worse.

Wedwagon
 

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if your going to try this your self get some spare pieces and practice first.if you get a buffer,start with a 1800 r.p.m motor. yeah it's slower but you can learn what that buffer will do, and you have way more control than a 3600 r.p.m motor.there are quite a few companys that sell buffing supplys.you can "stack" the wheels together so there fatter. also you never mix compounds and wheels.ex, 1 set of wheels will be for gray compound, 1 set of wheels will be for white, etc. mark the sides of the wheels with a marker, also the direction.use caution as others have stated, that wheel/part can get you!!if this is the only time your gonna do this your better off paying someone. all the wheels,compound,motor set up will add up $$.
 
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