Chevy Tri Five Forum banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For those of you that took music theory or studied it, did it help you to learn to play better or memorize the notes/patterns easier? I'm picking up this music thing again before I die with the regret of never having done it
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,701 Posts
Yes, studying theory definitely makes it easier for you see patterns and
improvise.....BUT,

I think studying guitar-specific methods like the CAGED system and some of the newer guitar learning programs can get you to a really good balance of theory/practicality fairly quickly.
The goal is to get the patterns and theory into your head/hands till it is so automatic that you don't even realize you
are doing it. You get to that point by really good practice habits and lots of time with the guitar in your hands.

Heck, I used to turn on music and jam along in the total darkness just so I didn't rely on looking at the fretboard..
Wish I had time to play a lot more these days.
 

·
Trifive Certified Restoration Shop
Joined
·
3,477 Posts
Back when I used to play i knew every fret tone by heart. Didn't need sheet music. Just listened to the tune and then played it.

HAven't played guitar in over 30 years now. Kind of a shame. I could be jammin with the daughter nowadays with her and her violin or big Bass.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,701 Posts
Never heard of the caged system:confused0006:
Ernie,

If you already know the C, A, G, E, and D open chord shapes you can
progress relatively quickly using the CAGED system. It uses basic, guitar-based theory and chord shapes to teach you the neck.
It is an extremely useful system.

Look it up online by doing some searches and watch some videos on Youtube.

There honestly has never been a better time to learn to play a musical
instrument. Free instructions are everywhere on the web. I wish I would have
had Youtube when I was a kid and learning to play guitar.

I can also recommend some good instructional books, sites, etc.
if you want.

Curious..
What song would you like to be able to play if you could learn it tomorrow?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Ernie,

If you already know the C, A, G, E, and D open chord shapes you can
progress relatively quickly using the CAGED system. It uses basic, guitar-based theory and chord shapes to teach you the neck.
It is an extremely useful system.

Look it up online by doing some searches and watch some videos on Youtube.

There honestly has never been a better time to learn to play a musical
instrument. Free instructions are everywhere on the web. I wish I would have
had Youtube when I was a kid and learning to play guitar.

I can also recommend some good instructional books, sites, etc.
if you want.

Curious..
What song would you like to be able to play if you could learn it tomorrow?
Geoff, I want to play EVERY song, lol! Seriously, music is a huge part of my life, can't get anything done with out it playing in the background. Can't really nail down any one song at the moment
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,214 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ernie,

If you already know the C, A, G, E, and D open chord shapes you can
progress relatively quickly using the CAGED system. It uses basic, guitar-based theory and chord shapes to teach you the neck.
It is an extremely useful system.

Look it up online by doing some searches and watch some videos on Youtube.

There honestly has never been a better time to learn to play a musical
instrument. Free instructions are everywhere on the web. I wish I would have
had Youtube when I was a kid and learning to play guitar.

I can also recommend some good instructional books, sites, etc.
if you want.

Curious..
What song would you like to be able to play if you could learn it tomorrow?
Youtube is great! The other night I started learning Let it be, by the beatles, on piano. When I learn that completely I will sit down at the piano with the guitar and see if I can work it out on the guitar. I also just ordered a 3 dvd set of CAGED guitar instruction. Lets see how that works out:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,233 Posts
Youtube is great! The other night I started learning Let it be, by the beatles, on piano. When I learn that completely I will sit down at the piano with the guitar and see if I can work it out on the guitar. I also just ordered a 3 dvd set of CAGED guitar instruction. Lets see how that works out:D
Ok Ernie youve had a year and a half with the caged system. Are you a better guitar player now?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,493 Posts
learn the scales. It then comes down to muscle memory. I can't tell you the notes but I know the fingering! You can learn blues and rock scales on youtube. Then when playing against backing tracks it's just a matter of what scale your riffing in. Any note within that scale will work. I.E. learn a pentatonic scale and you can play most any rock 3 chord progression song.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,123 Posts
Yes, studying theory definitely makes it easier for you see patterns and
improvise.....BUT,

I think studying guitar-specific methods like the CAGED system and some of the newer guitar learning programs can get you to a really good balance of theory/practicality fairly quickly.
The goal is to get the patterns and theory into your head/hands till it is so automatic that you don't even realize you
are doing it. You get to that point by really good practice habits and lots of time with the guitar in your hands.

Heck, I used to turn on music and jam along in the total darkness just so I didn't rely on looking at the fretboard..
Wish I had time to play a lot more these days.
When my friends and I were learning the guitar I was absolutely useless. No matter how hard I tried I just could not get my fingers to go where they should at the right time. Then I was handed a left handed guitar and before you know it I could mimic what was showen to me from the others. I didn't have the money to buy a left handed guitar so there ended my career.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,085 Posts
I have the musical talent of a doorknob. I'm tone deaf, can't sing, and after years of frustration trying to learn to play the guitar I finally came to the realization that I'd never be a musician...as much as I love to listen to music.
My two younger brothers got all the musical genes in the family. The oldest, Ron, has been a musician for 45+ yrs now. Learned how to play the saxophone in school and played in school bands from grade school through high school. He plays everything from rock to passable Flamenco on the guitar. He also learned over the years how to play passable drums, electric piano and organ, electric fiddle, Mandolin, electric and stand-up bass, as well as harmonica, flute, saxophone and of all things accordion. Also he has a great voice as does my youngest brother who is also a passable drummer and piano player.
When Ron's daughter wanted to learn the guitar he told her he would teach her but she had to learn to 'live with the instrument', practice, practice, practice...today she is a pretty good guitar player. Even today Ron will sit down with the instrument playing quiet riffs, rarely looking at the frets, while carrying on conversations or watching TV.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top