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I'm thinking I should put a electric fan on my car, I want to go with a pusher with a probe if its possible. I have read some of the pages here that I could find I realize that pushers don't have alot of fans here it seems. My car is fine temp wise driving and slow moving, but seems I may want the extra insurance with a electric pusher fan for extended stop and go if I get into that. I have a cold case down flow radiator, a 6 blade mechanical fan, vintage air poly fan shroud.
I want to keep my original dash gauge functioning off the intake sensor near the thermostat is the reason for exploring the probe style thermostat for the fan unless there are other options I don't know about. I think I would like an adjustable thermostat for the fan so I can play with it to get it where I want it. It is an fresh 65' 327 with original heads so my options are limited I think on places to put a probe. I have found an american volt 16" pusher with adjustable thermostat and the probe feature, but I don't know this brand, how quiet or reliable it is. Since I'm going to spend some bucks on the efi setup I thought why not do this at the same time.
So how about it? thought and options wanted
 

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Not a "fan" of the idea...However, I'll bring this back to the top for you
 

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I'm running the same setup on my current build. I have a mechanical engine fan that keeps my car cool, and running around 180 degrees. But on extremely hot days, and caught in heavy traffic I use a pusher fan as a backup, and an adjustable stat with a sensor on the backside of the radiator to call on a relay that starts the fan.
I found a stat that was $19, and already had a 40 a. Spahl fan relay. So wired it all in with a master shut off switch, and I control the ground side of the relay's coil through the sensor.
Once it was wired I started the car and let it idle a long time in the driveway. Eventually I put cardboard in front of the radiator to force it to get over 175 degrees. Once it hit 185 degrees I turned the stat until the fan came on, and then removed the cardboard and watched to see it cycle off as the temp got back down to 175.
It works great, and gives me the insurance I wanted to handle any hot weather driving I might encounter.
 

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I have a pusher fan and probe on my 54 Olds and it does what I need it to do. I have an aluminum radiator with a 6 blade fan and a shroud. It also has AC. If I get in slow traffic on one of those hot Texas days it will warm up without the fan.
 

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The EFI system is going to need a temp. sensor. A good system will allow you to control the fan.
 

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My neighbor's 56 wagon with a mild 350 added a pusher fan to his mechanical clutch fan. I asked him if he actually benefited from the pusher and he responded with a resounding "YES...in high density stop 'n go traffic".

I was surprised with his response since I've never been a fan (no pun intended) of pushers.
 

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Often a pusher fan will block airflow to the radiator when it's not running. So that requires it to run a lot.

The temperature probe that's placed in the radiator fins is not going to read the same temperature as the sensor that's directly in the coolant. Temperature in the radiator fins is highly dependent on the location in the radiator - i.e., whether it's near the inlet or the outlet or somewhere in between. The radiator can be cool and the engine hot.

There are much better ways of controlling temperature.
 

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Often a pusher fan will block airflow to the radiator when it's not running. So that requires it to run a lot.

The temperature probe that's placed in the radiator fins is not going to read the same temperature as the sensor that's directly in the coolant. Temperature in the radiator fins is highly dependent on the location in the radiator - i.e., whether it's near the inlet or the outlet or somewhere in between. The radiator can be cool and the engine hot.

There are much better ways of controlling temperature.
There's no reason a temperature probe mounted to the radiator needs to read the same temperature as the coolant. As I said before, I set my stat/probe to come on when my gauge reads 185 degrees. So I don't care if the probe is doing so at 160 or 170, or whatever temperature. It's simply coming on at a point I selected.
I agree that a pusher fan can block some air, but what good does it do if it's not there and the engine temp reaches a point that it needs more cooling, but you don't have it? If having my pusher fan means it runs more often, or comes on sooner; I'll accept that for the benefit of not worrying about overheating.
 

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Often a pusher fan will block airflow to the radiator when it's not running. So that requires it to run a lot.
I agree that a pusher fan can block some air,
I hear this all the time about pusher fans....However, I don't understand why a puller fan doesn't block air flow, when its not running 😕 Please explain someone.
 

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.... I don't understand why a puller fan doesn't block air flow, when its not running 😕 Please explain someone.
I suspect that a non running puller fan becomes "non running" only when the the coolant temps are below the selected max temp and therefore any airflow blocking becomes a non issue until the temp sensor signals a need for the puller fan to be activated and subsequently provide additional airflow for cooling.
 

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I suspect that a non running puller fan becomes "non running" only when the the coolant temps are below the selected max temp and therefore any airflow blocking becomes a non issue until the temp sensor signals a need for the puller fan to be activated and subsequently provide additional airflow for cooling.
Yeah,,,That makes sense...A puller fan is your only fan...Whereas, a pusher is usually an auxiliary fan
 

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Ran a pusher with temp probe for awhile on my 67 327. Worked ok until it overheated due to probe moving away from radiator. I would not use a probe but instead go with an on / off switch or temp sensor in the intake.
Larry
 

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If you need a temp sensor for the fan set-up and don't have a spare port on your manifold (or head), you can use one of these: Moroso Thermostat Spacers 63433

 

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A pusher or a puller does deflect some air traveling through the core. But neither actually blocks it off. The air still travels through the core around the motor, as the motors aren't tight against the core. And the coolant isn't sitting still hiding behind the motor being heated up. It's simply passing behind the fan motor for a few seconds, and then it's being cooled on either side of the motor.
I seriously doubt the motor has very little to do with raising temperatures, and not sure what affect it does have as far as the engine running temperature. Not sure how one would test it either, unless you could put something the size of the motor in front, without fan blades, to check, and then move it to the back to compare results.
 
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