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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Guys, in my efforts to save a buck or two I'm considering "fabricating" this set up for a rear anti-sway bar - maybe, depending on the responses. The bar is a stock Chevy S-10 Blazer unit (4X4). Normally, it goes on the aft side of the differential. Due to tank, spare tire, and exhaust clearence issues, I plan to relocate it to the foreword side of the differential as shown. I'll make (2) bushings for either side of the frame that will be welded on then attach the bar. The one picture shows the upper potrion of the link attached to the frame using some nuts and washers to aquire desired/required spacing. Not being a suspension expert, my question is, is this a safe and sound idea? The best I can tell thus far there is no clearance issues with the bar hitting the differential in this location. As far as brake cables, etc. some minor re-location will be required. This will end up bing a $30 rear sway bar if it works. I do have a pocket kit installed. Thanks.
 

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Ceewdee that is similar to the Hellwig sway bar for pocket springs.
The Hellwig bar is adjustable but the arms are about the same length as yours.
Yours looks good.
What year S10 is the sway bar from?


 

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I agree that looks alot like my Helwig for mini-tub. But after I bought it I found one in my junk-pile off a 89 Z28 that looked like I could have fabbed it also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the helpful replies. The bar is out of a 1999 to 2004 S-10 Blazer (4X4). One other thing... I had the dang thing up side down in the first set of pictures. Corrected version attached, but I guess it'll work either way. I did have to relocate the bushing mounting spot on the second try. I'll still need to fabricate the bushings that are 1 3/8" thick that are drilled and tapped for 3/8" bolt. The 1 3/8" bushings will center up the sway bar perfectly. Thanks for the pictures of the Helwig.
 

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Looks like it will fit fine. And shouldn`t interfere with the exhaust installation like my rear sway bar did. My aftermarket one made it very tight between the tank and frame, plus the shock relocation bar didn`t help matters either.
Terry
 

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Thanks for the helpful replies. The bar is out of a 1999 to 2004 S-10 Blazer (4X4). One other thing... I had the dang thing up side down in the first set of pictures. Corrected version attached, but I guess it'll work either way. I did have to relocate the bushing mounting spot on the second try. I'll still need to fabricate the bushings that are 1 3/8" thick that are drilled and tapped for 3/8" bolt. The 1 3/8" bushings will center up the sway bar perfectly. Thanks for the pictures of the Helwig.
Wow, looks [B]GREAT[/B]!:alberteinstein:
 

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It looks safe to me, but I question the effectiveness with the supports so close to the center of the housing. The further outboard the better, but maybe it's far enough to help some.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Agreed. My intent is a good driver and doing it on a limited budget. I'll never compete at any track days at Super Chevy, just looking for something that is comfortable and competent that anyone can drive. All told, I'll have $30 to $40 bucks tied up in the rear sway bar once installed. I feel pretty good about that. Weather or not it is functional remains to be seen, but I have to believe it will have some benefit. Plus the money saved can go else where in the car. I do value all the member feedback, thank you.
 

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Rear sway bar frame mount location

One other minor consideration is the overhung load being applied to your frame mounts for the bar. If possible, try to close up the gap shown highlighted in RED in the attached photo, by juggling which side of the bar your links attach to, or by spreading the front of your bar, if you can. The large gap between the frame and the link end will likely fatigue the mounting area in the frame and crack it eventually, if it doesn't shear the bolt first. If you can't close the gap, a standoff of about 2" diameter will distribute most of the load to the surrounding frame material, and prevent failure at the mount point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks! The gap will be 1-3/8" from inside frame rail to the link. I'm made a bushing that is 2" OD x .75" thick then it steps down to 1.25" OD for 5/8". Drilled and tapped for 3/8" -18. The 2" OD part is the "flange" that will be welded to the frame. I also shortened the links to 4". I'll send some more pictures aftrer the install.
 
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