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It does appear the 2 post ones with the crossbar at the top seem to be right at 12' tall. Most of the shorter ones have the crossbar on the floor, which doesn't seem like as sturdy of a design.
My lift is 14' tall. It has 2' extensions at the top of each post. It won't lift a car any higher that a 12' lift but it will allow you to run up a tall vehicle like a van without hitting the cross bar at the top. For the vast majority of cars a 12' lift will work great.
 

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I’m following along as I’m considering a build as well. Similar situation with the house and garage being built concurrently. I’ve added complexity by wanting to move several states away, as well 😜
 

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I’m following along as I’m considering a build as well. Similar situation with the house and garage being built concurrently. I’ve added complexity by wanting to move several states away, as well 😜
I'm in the process of planning a detached garage. (In another thread, I asked about sealing the floor.)

As I considered the specifications of the garage, it occurred to me that I would have room for a lift for the very first time.

Some of the questions to be answered are kind of obvious. 2 post are better for repairs, while 4 post are better for storage (though some under car work is feasible).

I need to consider the garage floor itself. The builder has specified 4" of 3000 PSI concrete in his quote. This seems to be the minimum for the typical 9000 pound 2 post lift, with slightly less required for 4 post. Do you find this to be adequate, or should the thickness be bumped up a bit?

Also, I would like to hear recommendations on specific lifts in the 9000-10000 pound range (both for and against), in terms of specific brands and models. (I don't anticipate anything bigger than a 3/4 ton truck or Suburban, which are in the 6000 pound range.)
I'm in the process of planning a detached garage. (In another thread, I asked about sealing the floor.)

As I considered the specifications of the garage, it occurred to me that I would have room for a lift for the very first time.

Some of the questions to be answered are kind of obvious. 2 post are better for repairs, while 4 post are better for storage (though some under car work is feasible).

I need to consider the garage floor itself. The builder has specified 4" of 3000 PSI concrete in his quote. This seems to be the minimum for the typical 9000 pound 2 post lift, with slightly less required for 4 post. Do you find this to be adequate, or should the thickness be bumped up a bit?

Also, I would like to hear recommendations on specific lifts in the 9000-10000 pound range (both for and against), in terms of specific brands and models. (I don't anticipate anything bigger than a 3/4 ton truck or Suburban, which are in the 6000 pound range.)
Not sure what part of the country you are in,but I would recommend in floor heat. I built my 36x52 shop sixteen years ago and put floor heat in. Concrete is a minimum of four inches thick except where the hoist was going to go. There I had a four foot square area that was a minimum of six inches thick . Ended up being more.
For the hoist, I bought a 10000 pound Rotary Lift. Asymmetrical two post. I did a lot of research before buying and thought that Rotary and Bend Pack were at the top. Both go through tests and are certified. I went with Rotary because there is a dealer here in town and I thought I got a good deal. I also had them install it for a fee, but it doubled the warranty.
Good luck on your builds!
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
Not sure what part of the country you are in,but I would recommend in floor heat. I built my 36x52 shop sixteen years ago and put floor heat in. Concrete is a minimum of four inches thick except where the hoist was going to go. There I had a four foot square area that was a minimum of six inches thick . Ended up being more.
For the hoist, I bought a 10000 pound Rotary Lift. Asymmetrical two post. I did a lot of research before buying and thought that Rotary and Bend Pack were at the top. Both go through tests and are certified. I went with Rotary because there is a dealer here in town and I thought I got a good deal. I also had them install it for a fee, but it doubled the warranty.
Good luck on your builds!
Okay, here's where the regional differences come into play.

I'm in central North Carolina (not the mountains or the coast). Winters here - well, we occasionally see snow. We occasionally drive in snow, but it's usually better to stay home and wait for it to melt. No, I'm not joking.

If I need to work in my attached garage on a cold night in winter, I can plug in a 1500 watt portable heater. I come back in 10-15 minutes, and I can turn it down to low. Laying on the concrete floor is still a bit chilly. Of course, "a cold winter night" sometimes drops into the teens overnight around here, while single-digits are almost unheard of.

The bigger issue is the humidity in summer. We have what I call our "90-90" days - where the temperature is over 90 degrees and humidity over 90 percent. We see lots of those. A detached garage either needs A/C or a dehumidifier to dry it out. I run a dehumidifier in my attached garage to protect my '57. It's from southern California, so no reason to start subjecting it to humidity at this point.

My neighbor has 2 high dollar Mopars (including a factory 426 hemi car). He's had an insulated detached garage with a dehumidifier running year-round for over 30 years, and his cars have been preserved quite well in these conditions. Interestingly, he didn't install HVAC.

Your point on floor thickness is well taken. The builder spec'd 4" concrete. That's the bare minimum for a lift - and we all know that bare minimum on these things is asking for trouble.
 

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A 5 inch thick floor with heavy wire is more than adaquet unless you work on firetrucks or battleships.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
The quote for the garage is an itemized list. The footings, foundation block, and concrete slab are separate line items.

The slab cost - for the stone, wire mesh, vapor barrier, expansion joints, and the actual concrete - is $4800. So, if that's for 4" concrete like in the attached garage (the quote didn't mention thickness - go figure), doing the entire 28x40 as 6" should be no more than $2000 extra.

How much I could save by only doing the back half (where I don't have to worry about the 10' garage door track interfering with a lift) depends on whether he's open to pouring 2 thicknesses instead of 1.
 

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As far as garage doors go if you are going to have a opener buy one with a jack shaft system versus a standard style opener & have the tracks extended so the door when up is as close to the ceiling as possible. This gives maximum clearance for a lift.
 

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I'm in the process of planning a detached garage. (In another thread, I asked about sealing the floor.)

As I considered the specifications of the garage, it occurred to me that I would have room for a lift for the very first time.

Some of the questions to be answered are kind of obvious. 2 post are better for repairs, while 4 post are better for storage (though some under car work is feasible).

I need to consider the garage floor itself. The builder has specified 4" of 3000 PSI concrete in his quote. This seems to be the minimum for the typical 9000 pound 2 post lift, with slightly less required for 4 post. Do you find this to be adequate, or should the thickness be bumped up a bit?

Also, I would like to hear recommendations on specific lifts in the 9000-10000 pound range (both for and against), in terms of specific brands and models. (I don't anticipate anything bigger than a 3/4 ton truck or Suburban, which are in the 6000 pound range.)
I did all the homework on this subject before building my garage and installing my lift. If you are going with a 2 post lift you should have a 3 foot square by 12 inches thick where the lift post are going to be placed, the rest of the garage floor can be 4 inches thick. If you are installing a 4 post lift you need to have a 2 foot square by 8 inches thick where the lift post are going to be placed. I decided to go with the four post lift so I had my entire floor poured 8 inched thick as my lift can be moved with a car on it any where in the garage. You will find out that the 8 inch thick is actually not much more out of your pocket as the labor required to set it up and accomplish it cost the same . Only the extra cost of the concrete is an added cost. I bought a Bend-Pak with the mobility adapter. With a four post you won't need to bolt the lift to the floor.
 

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My floor is 4" reinforced concrete with rebar and a pad where my lift is that is either 6 or 8" thick can't remember for sure. It was built in 2007 there is not one single crack in that floor can't say the same for the apron it's cracking & has sunk on one end about 1" The guys I used to have install lifts in the dealership I worked at always drilled all the way through the concrete when installing the anchors that way if removing or moving the lift they simply drove them flush with the floor or all the way through.
 
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