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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a metal question more than anything so I decided to start the thread here. I have been battling a gas leak when my tank is half full or more and I have finally determined that the brass fitting that is soldered on to accept the fuel line is leaking where it is soldered. There must be a void in the solder joint and I will have to remove the sender and try to re-solder the joint. My question is this, can I just heat the joint and melt the solder to seal the leak or will I have to melt out all of the solder and start from scratch. If I do have to start over what kind of solder should I use? I was thinking of trying a propane torch and just melting the solder since I don't know if I can get it hot enough with a solder gun. The sending unit is only a year old and in good shape. Any suggestions? Thanks.
 

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I agree...You'll have to use a torch....I've seen super small one at HF.....Just make sure there are no linguring gas fumes.
 

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I had to do the same thing to mine. The previous owner had put in a brand new sending unit to get the car running and sell it but managed to flex the outlet pipe just a little bit while installing it. This cracked the solder joint and the tank leaked fuel all over the fresh pavement in front of my house the first time I filled it past halfway... (fuel and fresh pavement don't get along very well).

Long story short, get some bottled soldering flux (radio shack, even home depot should sell this), a cheap propane torch head ($14 from Harbor Freight with built-in igniter) and a small bottle of propane (coleman or any other brand). Apply flux liberally, apply heat directly to the solder and try to heat it evenly. It should reflow and get shiny under the flux at about 700 degrees F. Apply more flux as needed to keep the solder wet with it while heating.

It wouldn't hurt to have a little more solder (fluxless solid) on hand in case there are large voids or the solder wicks down the outlet tube and you find the joint doesn't have enough left for a good seal. Better to have it ready while the unit is hot than to have to redo it.

Cheers -
Jon
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Nutjob, that's what I thought I'd need to do. I will just treat it like I'm sweating a pipe. Never soldered brass to anything but copper before so I had to ask before I screw it up. Thanks again!
 
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