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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
A few days ago I decided to list some parts I wanted to sell on a site that caters to the racing community. The listing automatically included my phone number which I was a bit leery of but, I figured I could deal with it. We already get multiple spam calls every day anyway. So right away I get three texts to the number asking if the item was still for sale. Mind you, the site has a perfectly good way of messaging the seller without having to send a text. However, these days, everyone seems to want to text instead of just picking up the phone and calling.

Anyway, two of the three responders immediately wanted to buy the item and arrange to "pick it up". One was going to mail a certified check via USPS overnight and the other wanted to send the money to my PayPal account. The PP guy(?) asked for the email address to send the funds which I gave to him. Shortly thereafter, an email from [email protected] shows up in the spam folder. Right away I realized this was bogus because PayPal does business as a .com address. When confronted, the individual (who had identified as "Bethany Holmes") became abusive and insisted that to get the money I needed to reply to the email. When I refused, he claimed PayPal had already deducted the funds from his account. I politely replied that he should request a refund. Again he demanded that I reply to the email. At which point I blocked the number.

This kind of behavior is why I quit buying/selling on Cr***list. But the key takeaway from the experience is that if the buyer doesn't seem interested in the details about the item, is willing to pay the asking price and wants to pick it up locally it's probably a scam. They need you to reply to the email or click a link in it to do their dirty work. I'm sure a lot of you have run into this, but it's worth repeating - never reply to or click on a link in a suspicious email.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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Terry
Fortunately, this wasn't associated with our forum, it was a classified ad site. The scammer avoided identification by using a spoofed phone number to communicate directly to my phone number. If he had replied via the site's messaging system, he would have been exposed. Which is another good reason to take a hard pass on letting your phone number be accessible. That part is on me.
 

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A few days ago I decided to list some parts I wanted to sell on a site that caters to the racing community. The listing automatically included my phone number which I was a bit leery of but, I figured I could deal with it. We already get multiple spam calls every day anyway. So right away I get three texts to the number asking if the item was still for sale. Mind you, the site has a perfectly good way of messaging the seller without having to send a text. However, these days, everyone seems to want to text instead of just picking up the phone and calling.

Anyway, two of the three responders immediately wanted to buy the item and arrange to "pick it up". One was going to mail a certified check via USPS overnight and the other wanted to send the money to my PayPal account. The PP guy(?) asked for the email address to send the funds which I gave to him. Shortly thereafter, an email from [email protected] shows up in the spam folder. Right away I realized this was bogus because PayPal does business as a .com address. When confronted, the individual (who had identified as "Bethany Holmes") became abusive and insisted that to get the money I needed to reply to the email. When I refused, he claimed PayPal had already deducted the funds from his account. I politely replied that he should request a refund. Again he demanded that I reply to the email. At which point I blocked the number.

This kind of behavior is why I quit buying/selling on Cr***list. But the key takeaway from the experience is that if the buyer doesn't seem interested in the details about the item, is willing to pay the asking price and wants to pick it up locally it's probably a scam. They need you to reply to the email or click a link in it to do their dirty work. I'm sure a lot of you have run into this, but it's worth repeating - never reply to or click on a link in a suspicious email.
Thanks for sharing your experience, the paypal thing is especially interesting (to me) and clearly something to be avoided. No matter what, there's always someone out there trying to fleece others out of their hard earned money through dishonest means.
 

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Its stories like this, that is why i am so hesitant to sell stuff. I always assume someone is up to no good at first, then maybe work towards the possibility that this person is legit, and might be truly interested in something i have for sale. I hate people i dont know coming to my house. I would rather pass some of my old stuff along to a friend in need. I had my Monte Carlo sitting covered up in my driveway when the '55 took its place in the garage. needed to be sold, but was trying to figure out a way to make it leave, without me entertaining every tom, dick and harry from the city kicking tires. An old friend swung by one day, BS'ed for a while, in the end, he had a friend that he contacted about the car, and ended up buying it. At a really good price. I gave my buddy the 17" rims and tires from my Camaro for his '66 bel air. I didnt like the 17's on the Camaro, but those 13" wide rear tires look sooooo good on his car.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Its stories like this, that is why i am so hesitant to sell stuff. I always assume someone is up to no good at first, then maybe work towards the possibility that this person is legit, and might be truly interested in something i have for sale. I hate people i dont know coming to my house. I would rather pass some of my old stuff along to a friend in need. I had my Monte Carlo sitting covered up in my driveway when the '55 took its place in the garage. needed to be sold, but was trying to figure out a way to make it leave, without me entertaining every tom, dick and harry from the city kicking tires. An old friend swung by one day, BS'ed for a while, in the end, he had a friend that he contacted about the car, and ended up buying it. At a really good price. I gave my buddy the 17" rims and tires from my Camaro for his '66 bel air. I didnt like the 17's on the Camaro, but those 13" wide rear tires look sooooo good on his car.
I've also been reluctant to advertise parts for all the same reasons. Even if you connect with a good person, it's still probably wise to do the handoff at a police or fire station. I was busy and missed the local swap meets this fall. However, a few things I need to move are pricier and appeal to a very limited audience so I decided to take a chance on a classified ad site. I obviously need to be careful, but I'm going to let it play out a bit longer in hopes I find an honest buyer.
 

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Put an ad in the WTB section here and you will recieve numerous bogus offers. One idiot cut and pasted photos of the item from EBAY.
 

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I've only lost money once. I paid him with PayPal through Facebook. He said he didn't know how to use regular PayPal. I should have known $200 for both sides of 57 hardtop quarter stainless, was too good to be true. That being said, I've bought and sold lots of stuff with no problems. I've received parts from here before paying and gotten/given free parts. My wife got ripped off twice last year and PayPal refunded the money. I just sent two wiper motors that were paid by PayPal beforehand. One guy even sent a prepaid shipping label. I bought a p case posi and sold an open third member recently, met them in a parking lot. One was about half way, one was 8 miles for me and 60 for him.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It's nice to hear positive outcomes - helps restore faith in my fellow enthusiasts. It is depressing though when you encounter a con artist. Some years ago I used PayPal to make a deposit on a car I found online. Long story but he'd already sold the car to someone else and when the opportunity arose, he took my payment and cut off all communication. That's when I found out that automotive transactions like that aren't covered by PayPal. I was pretty upset at the prospect of losing $1500 but someone suggested that since the payment was backed by our credit card I should have a talk with the bank. We filled out a fraud claim and within 24 hours had our money back. Not sure what PayPal did, but we never heard any more about it.
 

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thanks for warning Victor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
thanks for warning Victor.
Sure thing, Carl, just wanted to remind folks to be on the lookout. Shame it has to be that way. I remember a time when it wasn't.
The more people are aware the better folks can deal with these idiots
I agree. They use a lot of social engineering to entrap folks. Their communications are structured to hit all your hot buttons. Quick sale at listed price and more often than not, they'll arrange pickup so you don't have to deal with shipping. What's not to like? Just click on the link in the email they send. And when you do, it's too late - you're hosed. I have another one that's after me right now. When I told him I'd been dealing with scammers, he changed tactics and tried to ingratiate himself by asking if I had a good night's rest. Establish trust and then set the hook I guess. I'll string him along for a bit and then block his number.
 

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I got burnt one time from a speed shop in Maryland for about $1400. He kept me on the hook for a few weeks with lame excuses. Luckily, I had paid w/CC from my C/U and filed a complaint. I got reimbursed. You would like to think everyone is as honest as you are, but it doesn't always works that way.
 
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