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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a dent fix spot weld drill and it works great on spot welds that are on a exposed flange, like the one where the inner and outer rockers spot weld together under the car, however, it will not work on the recessed flanges, like the ones where the floor spot welds to the outer rocker, because you cannot get the drills anvil down in the recess.

What is the best type of cutter to use. I have a couple of the rotary type that you use in a drill, but they are difficult to use, crawl all over the place and get dull after only a few cuts.

I am hoping that there is a better type of tool that you guys use for this.

Wayne
 

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Trifive Automotive Electrical Wiring Expert
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I have a couple of the rotary type that you use in a drill, but they are difficult to use, crawl all over the place and get dull after only a few cuts.

Wayne
I haven't had a problem of getting dull and I think I used the Eastwood bits, but to keep them from crawling, I use a dremal with a tiny round burr to grind a depression in the center of the spot weld. A small drill bit can also be used.
 

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I haven't had a problem of getting dull and I think I used the Eastwood bits, but to keep them from crawling, I use a dremal with a tiny round burr to grind a depression in the center of the spot weld. A small drill bit can also be used.
I use a center punch to give the point some teeth, so to speak. I recently did a customer unit that had over 500 spots removed and no failures with the above noted unit.
 

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I center punched the welds. Then drilled them out. Used small to larger dril bits.Some had to be broken with a hammer and chisel. On some of the weld I was able bend the standing over then used the spot weld bit.
 

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I center punched the welds. Then drilled them out. Used small to larger dril bits.Some had to be broken with a hammer and chisel. On some of the weld I was able bend the standing over then used the spot weld bit.
As a side note, I also use a quality putty blade in 1-1/2" and 3" width to persuade those final little bits that try to stay attached.
 

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As always, some guys really like the Blair tool. I have a Wivco tool that's similar but it has a few different features. Rather than a plain centering shaft, the Wivco tool has a 1/8" drill bit. It is replaceable. The one they supply has a locking flat for a set screw, but any 1/8" drill bit can be used as a replacement. The cutter end looks like a 2 flute end mill (except for the pilot drill of course). It cuts on the entire diameter. You can sharpen the bit yourself using a belt sander. But it will cut hundreds of spot welds without needing sharpening.

I had a "mini hole saw" type cutter prior to this one. I'll never buy another. The centering shaft is prone to breaking, and the cutters wear out fairly quickly. I've also found they grab and try to stall the drill more readily than the Wivco, which just keeps rotating and cutting. I'm sure the Blair is like that too. Either the Wivco or Blair will respond well to applying extra pressure, they just cut harder. When the hole saw type grabs (typically from a little extra pressure), the cutter can break.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks, guys, I thought maybe I was the only one who had trouble with the mini hole saw type.

It looks like I just need a better tool. I will get one of the Wivco or Blair tools.

Wayne
 

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The set I have is like the one Rick is talking about. I am very happy with the cutters that are reversible (although with the heat generated, it is difficult to spin them off and thread them back on the other way). The drill bit is also double-sided with shaft in the middle to accommodate a set screw, but the drill bits themselves were garbage, breaking after 3 or 4 holes each (probably made you know where). I have been using some regular 1/8th bits, but the set screw doesn't like holding on to the machined part of the drill bit. I just received some new bits that are double-sided from a mechanic friend who claims they shouldn't break.....I haven't tried yet.
Gotta tell ya'....really hate that job!:anim_25:

Eugene
 

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You can also buy "Blue Point" sets on EBAY that I have seen before. I believe they are part of "Snap-On's" arsenal but the cheaper line made overseas.....someone correct me if I am wrong. Don't know anything about them as I have not used them. Price is right, but don't know how good they are.

Eugene
 

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When I use mine, I usually use a center punch and hammer, then drill a pilot hole with either a regular 1/8" drill bit or even a center drill like you'd use on a lathe. That takes some of the work load off the pilot bit in the cutter and over a series of spot welds it saves time even with having to change bits.

I'm sure that the Snap On "Blue Point" tool works fairly well, just don't know the details. Don't know what it costs, it probably still isn't cheap, but it may be a good value. Which is the point on the Blair and Wivco compared to the others. Their cost definitely gives you value, even if the tool isn't the least expensive.
 

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I'm one of these guys who likes to try different tool, but when it comes to spot weld drills I think I've found a winner. I really like these. Their not cheap but man the sure can cut. I also like using my spring loaded center punch on the other type with the starter drill if you will but I've found with these if you just put the end of the bit on the spotweld and start off slow you have good control and the bit which in actually an endmill doesn't walk all over the place





http://spotwelddrills.com/products-page/hand-drill-versions/
 
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