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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Got a Evertough coil spring internal compressor from the local Oreilly, part # 67050. Looks like the one in this thread;

http://www.trifive.com/forums/showthread.php?t=70880&highlight=spring+compressor

Following the directions and I get to number three: "With the screw shaft centered, engage the hooks so that both hooks securely grip a coil toward the top of the spring."

Can't get the dang screw shaft and hook arms inside the coil to open up and fit between the coils. Even with the longer hook arm inserted through a coil, the smaller arm is too long to pivot in the screw shaft and clear the coil so it can engage the spring. Can't slip it through the coils sideways, either. Haven't even got to the point of using the forked plate (shoe) that slips through the coils.

It's like the internal diameter of the coil spring is too small for the screw shaft and hooks to fit. Grrrr....

A search shows how to make a homemade external compressor, and I'll do that. But, this Orielly thing has me feeling like an idiot. Is it me, or is the tool too big/wide for the spring?
 

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I use one or two of those aluminum twist in spacers that go in between the coils that people use when they want to raise their car. The spacers seperate the spring enough to allow the hooks to slide right thru. I'm pulling some springs off today so if you need I can take some pictures. Obviously you need your car jacked up and supported so the springs are also unloaded which I'm sure you probably have already done.
 

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Not all of these compressors fit the springs on our cars. Some are too big, some are too small. And even if they fit, it's often a job to get the hooks positioned.

First off, the end that is up in that photo must be used on the bottom, so that your impact can go through the hole in the lower control arm. Also, I don't think you can latch the hooks that close to the top (bottom in the photo) because the spring is up inside the frame pocket with very little access to maneuver the hooks. What might work is to position the hooks where you can see them, 2-3 coils down from the location shown in the photo. But that's possibly going to limit how much you can compress the spring.

The other thing I don't like about that setup is that it requires you to be under the car to turn the lead screw on the compressor. You should have a jack or a chain on the control arm or spring, but even at that, you're in the line of fire if something gives.

That's why I like to use the factory style compressor, probably the same one you mention as home made.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Talldeck427.... Thanks, your post remeinded me that dad said he torched the springs all those years ago to lower the car. Hence the reason the screw arm wouldn't fit between the coils. Same problem with the notched fork. A spacer gave me the room I needed. Just wanted to see if this thing would fit or not. But it doesn't look right.

Rick... yeah, it seems to be a real PITA to fit the hooks up high. And yes, I realize the photo shows the spring upside down after removal. Car is jacked up on stands, and the spring has a chain through it, but reaching the shaft to screw it tight is problematic now since it has to be reached through the shock hole in the lower control arm. Now that I have it in place, I don't like the angles involved. I guess having torched springs adds another level of complexity to fitting this tool correctly.

Glad to know some of these tools don't fit our older tri-five springs. I thought I was seing things.
 

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It's very dangerous to compress a spring without having it captive between frame and lower A-arm, and secured with a chain. I'm convinced the best way to do it right is to use a factory style, homemade spring compressor and remove the lower control arms.

Read post # 6 here:
http://www.trifive.com/forums/showthread.php?t=42110
 

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It's been many years since I replaced mine but I know I didn't use any special tools. I had ordered my springs custom to keep the factory height with the extra weight of the BB. I recall seeing the spring in place but bowed out towards me until I jacked up the lower control arm... with the jack and me in the front so if it popped out it wouldn't hit me.
 

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I used one I bought from Northern tool. Actually I have two types one inside and one outside. Actually two of each.

The one that goes inside hooks on to the spring both sides. I had to disasemble rotate the hook up or down to where I could fit the shaft. You might have to spread the spring to get hook to seat properly. Try to get it set so the spring compresses somewhat evenly. I did both my 57 and my 81 vette.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
After looking at how the Orielly compressor didn't quite fit and fought me, I decided to go down to the local hardware and bought the 1/2" all-thread stuff and made my own. Worked like a charm.

As a side note, I FINALLY found a use for that damnable Gearwrench ratchet set I bought years ago. I never liked it, since the nuts and bolts tended to slip right through it. But in this case, it was the perfect tool for the job. The ratchet slipped over the 1/2" all-thread perfectly, and let me slide it down the all-thread to tighten the nut with a ratchet instead of using an open-ended or box wrench.

Had the usual fight with the ball joints. BFH and then a BBFH, and then a pickel fork. After fifty years, there was a lot of play in them anyway, so I guess it's better to replace them. All the other rubber bushings look dried up and cracked, with too much slop in the steering wheel, so it's best to replace everything while I have it apart.

Sigh... Another trip out back to the money tree. That poor thing is starting to look kinda kinda bare. :sign0020:

Thanks for all the replies.
 

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If you shop around, you can find a thicker nut, which spreads the load over more threads. You will need that with most commonly available threaded rods. The strongest ones I can find are Grade 2, and I suspect those at hardware stores are Grade 1. That's probably even a good reason use 5/8" rod.
 
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